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I just adopted a rescue and we've been working on his separation anxiety. We've eliminated most of it in-home but I have no idea how to approach his anxiety on walks.

We go for 2 jogs a day for a total of an hour plus playtime at home so I'm sure it is not an issue of his energy level. He weighs 70 pounds and does not pull on the leash while jogging.

The problem is if we encounter a dog that is enthusiastic and wants to play with him he does NOT want to part. He'll scream as if he's being murdered, jump, and sometimes even nip if he does not get his way. This does not happen if we encounter a dog that is not energetic or does not want to play.

This is especially frustrating since he experiences this on the sidewalks of busy streets and I am afraid he will jump onto an oncoming car or pull us both and get ran over.

It is embarrassing to have to apologise and ask that the owner walks us home so he stays composed.

I've tried using a head collar and no-pull harness but he will still struggle to follow the dog. What I've been doing is gradually following the dog but at a very slow pace to eventually get them out of my dogs sight and once he has his focus back on me we'll continue our walk.

How do I fix this behaviour? Any advice?
 

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Time is all that can help. He needs furry friends. My daughter's Yorkie was attached to me all day and part of the night while she went to school and worked. We've had our younger dog, a Morkie, for only a few months and so far my daughter's dog ignores me and generally focuses on the other dog. They know the difference and prefer other dogs' company, is my best advice. Get some dog play dates.
 

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That is actually known as "frustrated greeting" or greeting frustration. Pretty much any techniques that work for leash reactivity (CC/DS, BAT, LAT games) will work... The cherry on top is that you can use interaction with a dog as the reward.


Another thing you can do to improve things is find a playmate to play with your dog a few times a week, or sign him up for some half-days at a doggy daycare. Remember, saturation decreases motivation. So the more dogs your dog gets to rub shoulders with, the less interesting the dogs on your wall will become.
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