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Okay guys soo its now day 8 and he FINALLY ATE SOME CHICKEN BREAST, i did the whole meat flavored water thing for the last 2 days and i really think it triggered his appetite, hes looking A TON better today, walking around wagging his tail ect, alot of his energy and strength has returned he ate about half a whole chicken breast!!!

i also gave him some liquid vitamin B12 and i also gave him Paxxin a.k.a Parvaid prior to his appetite returned, thank you everyone for the helpful input and thank you soo much for caring i think my pup is gonna make a full recovery!!!!
Fantastic news! The silver lining in all this is he will now have life-long immunity to Parvo and there is no need for him to be repeatedly vaccinated for it because the vaccine would do nothing to add to his immunity.
 

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My dog has parvo, he is being treated on an outpatient basis, he has been given an antiviral / antibiotic shot called Convenia as well as regular shots once a day of vomit suppressant drug called Cerenia and i am also giving him subcutaneous fluids as directed by my veterinarian however... it is now day 6 of symptoms and he has still yet to make any attempt to eat food. my question is: would the benefits of force feeding him outweigh the risks at this point? My vet advised AGAINST force feeding him yet i still feel like i should... any second opinions?
I would follow the Vets instructions, but I hope you don't have the same experience with Convenia that we did with Samantha. She had bronchitis and got that shot, unfortunately had a reaction to it. She had zero appetite, and the worst of it was that Convenia has a 60 day half life, so we couldn't get rid of it. She lost weight, we hand fed her anything she would eat, grass fed beef, roasted chicken anything to try to control weight loss. Took months, she finally got over it, and then of course we had the weight gain problem, which we still fight. Needless to say, I am not a fan of Convenia, which is convenient since its so long lasting, but if Samantha needs antibiotics now, its the short lasting pills, which I give her as often as needed. We had to take her to an internist who told us she has seen dogs die from reactions to that drug, again because its so long lasting and there is no way to get it out of the dogs system. Never again.
 

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I would follow the Vets instructions, but I hope you don't have the same experience with Convenia that we did with Samantha. She had bronchitis and got that shot, unfortunately had a reaction to it. She had zero appetite, and the worst of it was that Convenia has a 60 day half life, so we couldn't get rid of it. She lost weight, we hand fed her anything she would eat, grass fed beef, roasted chicken anything to try to control weight loss. Took months, she finally got over it, and then of course we had the weight gain problem, which we still fight. Needless to say, I am not a fan of Convenia, which is convenient since its so long lasting, but if Samantha needs antibiotics now, its the short lasting pills, which I give her as often as needed. We had to take her to an internist who told us she has seen dogs die from reactions to that drug, again because its so long lasting and there is no way to get it out of the dogs system. Never again.
Ive actually heard about negative side effects to convenia especially because of its long lasting effects, lucky my dog hasn't seemed to show any negative side effects but i do think its important to note that other peoples dogs make have a bad reaction and it is also something a vet should advise before administering
 

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Absolutely wonderful news! You are a good 'nurse'!!!!!
 

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Not sure where you got the idea Convenia had a 60 day half life... much of this drug is cleared from the average dog's system in 2-3 weeks (half that for cats). Use it a lot and so far I have not seen a bad reaction to it (sure those happen, though, as they do with every nearly single drug I know of).

As for 'force feeding' (aka syringe feeding) parvo puppies, the current thinking is to do it IF they are not currently vomiting. The sooner food starts going through a parvo dog's GI tract the better... UNLESS they continue to vomit. Then we wait another 12-24 hours and try it again. We have noted that puppies seem to recover a bit faster when we syringe feed them.
 
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