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Hello! I have a 7 year old Golden Doodle. We recently shaved his fur and there are large brown spots all over his back on his light fur. Underneath the fur it seems flaky and red. The vet scratched the skin and pus came out in the area that she scratched. She gave us antibiotics almost 2 weeks ago and there has been little to no change. Has anyone ever seen spots like this happen out of the blue?

Here is a photo of the spots:
http://img708.imageshack.us/img708/9058/002qjv.jpg
 

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Welcome to the forum..
Does he scratch a lot?
Did they do any blood work?
Is it only on his back?
How do his ears look down inside?
Does he lick hid feet at all?
What do you feed?
Does he get any treats?
 

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Uh... The fact that they are all down the spine concerns me... Any blood work or skin scrape done?
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Sometimes when you shave, areas grow back dark, but usually after some sort of trauma... That being said, the pattern is strange and of concern and your description of the pus is even weirder. I think it's time you brought your dog to a dermatologist if the antibiotics have done nothing. That cannot be diagnosed via the Internet.


Acvd.org will help you find a dermatologist in your area.
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Discussion Starter #5
Hi,

Does he scratch a lot? No
Did they do any blood work? No they didn't even suggest it
Is it only on his back? Yes
How do his ears look down inside? I didn't check but I will. What am I looking for?
Does he lick hid feet at all? Yes he has been licking his feet a lot.
What do you feed? Pure Vitae- Grain Free Chicken
Does he get any treats? Occasionally he gets Milk bone biscuits and American made rawhide retriever rolls.

Any insight that you have is appreciated. The doctor didn't seem to know what it was. She took a culture and there was some yeast and bacteria present. The sebacious cyst pus was unexpected because there wasn't even a cyst visually present there. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's a good idea. The vet also had suggested that we try a medicated shampoo but I opted for the other choice of antibiotics.
 

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my shih tzu did, she is 9 now. my vet said the skin changes as they age. i don't know if this is the same as ticking or not.. but kyia's is on her skin, not hair and i only saw them cause i shaved her. the only other thing i can think of it yeast infection, like systemic. also find a site dedicated to your breed. preferably a rescue group as they see many many issues continuously and can give you a wealth of info.so a golden retreiver rescue and a poodle rescue, is that the mix?
 

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Bacterial skin infections in dogs are frequently related to a hypersensitivity reaction (in many cases a food allergy). A skin biopsy may be necessary to accurately diagnose the pathology in your dog's skin. If your dog has pyoderma (a bacterial skin infection) the antibiotics should help, but until you identify the underlying allergy (or problem) there is a reasonable chance for recurrence.

I would also agree that your dog may benefit from a consultation with a dermatologist. You can get a referral from your family veterinarian.
 

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Yes, he is a golden retriever, standard poodle mix. The person who groomed him said that she has seen something like this before in golden retrievers. We wouldn't have noticed it if we hadn't shaved him. I will check out breed specific sites. Thank you.
 

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Bacterial skin infections in dogs are frequently related to a hypersensitivity reaction (in many cases a food allergy). A skin biopsy may be necessary to accurately diagnose the pathology in your dog's skin. If your dog has pyoderma (a bacterial skin infection) the antibiotics should help, but until you identify the underlying allergy (or problem) there is a reasonable chance for recurrence.

I would also agree that your dog may benefit from a consultation with a dermatologist. You can get a referral from your family veterinarian.
now what exactly does a skin biopsy do? my shih tzu has skin issues and i wanted something like this done, but unsure of what it diagnoses. would it diagnose a systemic yeast infection as well as food allergies and enviromental? or is it just for food allergies?

also would the regular vet to the biopsy or the dermatologist?

thank you..:)
 

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now what exactly does a skin biopsy do? my shih tzu has skin issues and i wanted something like this done, but unsure of what it diagnoses. would it diagnose a systemic yeast infection as well as food allergies and enviromental? or is it just for food allergies?

also would the regular vet to the biopsy or the dermatologist?

thank you..:)
Good question!

Just to clarify so everybody is on the same page: a skin biopsy is where we remove a full thickness piece of skin. In most cases we take a piece of abnormal skin, the junction where the skin transitions from abnormal to normal appearing, and a piece of normal skin. The biopsy is then fixed and sectioned by the pathologist, stained and then evaluated on a slide. The pathologist is evaluating the type of cells present, their organization and relationship to each other, and identifies if there are any abnormalities present.

How does this help us diagnose the problem? The cell population present can be very important in trying to figure out what disease process is happening in the skin. For example: differentiating between cancerous cells versus inflammatory cells, differentiating between different types of inflammatory cells, characterizing infectious agents present, etc.

The skin biopsy is not likely to tell you if you have a systemic allergy beyond telling us that there is significant inflammation within the skin, suggesting that the underlying issue is allergic skin disease. Similarly, we may see yeast or bacterial organisms in the skin on histopathology, but it doesn't tell us the type of bacteria or type of yeast present; we usually submit a skin sample for culture to characterize the type of bacteria present and define what antibiotic it is sensitive to.

Diagnosing specific allergies is typically done with intradermal allergy testing, the exact same way allergies are characterized in humans. This is a test typically performed by a specialist (as its expensive, and can be very difficult to interpret correctly) - a board certified dermatologist performs these tests at our hospital.

As for skin biopsies - are they important? The answer is definitely! They can be performed at your family veterinary clinic, usually with mild sedation and local anesthetic and they can provide invaluable information for your veterinarian to try and help your dog.
 

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Good question!

Just to clarify so everybody is on the same page: a skin biopsy is where we remove a full thickness piece of skin. In most cases we take a piece of abnormal skin, the junction where the skin transitions from abnormal to normal appearing, and a piece of normal skin. The biopsy is then fixed and sectioned by the pathologist, stained and then evaluated on a slide. The pathologist is evaluating the type of cells present, their organization and relationship to each other, and identifies if there are any abnormalities present.

How does this help us diagnose the problem? The cell population present can be very important in trying to figure out what disease process is happening in the skin. For example: differentiating between cancerous cells versus inflammatory cells, differentiating between different types of inflammatory cells, characterizing infectious agents present, etc.

The skin biopsy is not likely to tell you if you have a systemic allergy beyond telling us that there is significant inflammation within the skin, suggesting that the underlying issue is allergic skin disease. Similarly, we may see yeast or bacterial organisms in the skin on histopathology, but it doesn't tell us the type of bacteria or type of yeast present; we usually submit a skin sample for culture to characterize the type of bacteria present and define what antibiotic it is sensitive to.

Diagnosing specific allergies is typically done with intradermal allergy testing, the exact same way allergies are characterized in humans. This is a test typically performed by a specialist (as its expensive, and can be very difficult to interpret correctly) - a board certified dermatologist performs these tests at our hospital.

As for skin biopsies - are they important? The answer is definitely! They can be performed at your family veterinary clinic, usually with mild sedation and local anesthetic and they can provide invaluable information for your veterinarian to try and help your dog.
thank you for the quick and thorough response. yes it is a skin biopsy i was interested in as many people told me a skin scrapping for allergies seems to report 50 allergies or more and was a waste of money..

Kyia was 5 when she came to me , she came with hot spots, ear infections, eye infections, scabs and crusts and pusy sores in her skin, stained face and feet, smelly, sticky waxy brown goop on her nail beds. she was on cesars food too..ewwww. i switched her to homecooked food with vitamins and fish oils.then to raw, prey model and alot of that went away. but sometimes they pop up. i just want to get it solved once and for all. she is 9 now. i have a holistic vet which i will be seeing this thursday to ask for all these tests. just wanted to get my terminology straight. and know whether to ask for a specialist..

thanks
 
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