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Hello and thank you for viewing my thread! Any help at all is greatly appreciated. I'll start at the beginning. I will also give all the info i can think of... if its too much i apologize.

My wife and I adopted Lyric (yeasty dog) a couple years back. (we have one older dog that is a yorkie/bicheon) The humane society told us that Lyric is an american bulldog mixed with some sort of bird dog. HE IS DEAF. So out the gate he has been a lot of work. We have trained him with hand signals with great success, and even helped ease his fear of children. He has been one of the best, loyal dogs I have ever had and will never leave him.

For most of his time with us he has had yeast infections, almost constantly. STINKY!!! Our house smells now. The yeast grows mostly in his left arm pit, but has been seen in ears, butt, chin, and hot spot like areas in his toes. even his breath smells like it. We take him to the vet (and we have seen different vets) and treat him as directed and it will get better, but never seems to fully go away. We use the medicated shampoo, appoquil... it never really worked completely. So we dropped the money on the allergy test at the vets office. According to the test, he is allergic to EVERYTHING. Grasses, foods, dusts you name it he's allergic to it. We followed that test to the best of our ability, to no success. We have him on the best food we can afford. No table scraps. We are doing our absolute best. Now I have had another vet tell me that she doesn't think that the allergy tests are that great. I gotta say, i believe her. AM I CRAZY? She suggested that we see an animal dermatologist. YES? NO?

As for Lyric...
I feel like maybe he don't get the exercise he needs. But we have taken him to my parents property, which is great for dogs. And he will sniff around for 10 min or so and then just wants to lay around. He don't wanna fetch, or play at all. He's always been a lazy, cuddly dog.

any symptoms i can think of besides the yeast...
1. lazy?
2. shakes like he's cold daily but not constantly (it seems if were touching him he's good?)
3. I have noticed that his coat has became thinner since the issue began and doesn't thicken in the winter (has a bald spot on his tail)
4.Licking
5.dry mouth (he's always been this way. 3 times a day he will go to the water bowl and drink about half of it.... maybe he waits till everyone is home?)
6. pale pink gums (again since day one, but blood does return quikly when pressed and released)

all these symptoms have been around for a long time. again we take him to the vet and don't neglect his issues.

My thoughts are that maybe the yeast started as him being nervous (since he's deaf) and licking as soothing thing? and then the yeast set in where he was licking and is just hard to get rid of??? I don't know
We have recently started giving him CBD oil and treats (only as label directed) to maybe help calm his nerves.

Again, thank you for any help you can provide! We wanna help our boy.
If you need pics please just ask.
 

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Hi there.
Yeast infections can be caused by poor diet.
I would highly recommend altering the Dog's diet to something homemade.
Most store bought dog foods contain harmful ingredients. Such as corn and wheat gluten, meat and grain by-products, BHA, BHT, Ethoxyquin, Food dyes, PG and rendered fat. All of which can cause severe skin irritations, allergies and yeast infections.
I would also suggest no more treats. They also contain these same ingredients.
My Dog had yeast infections and after switching to a homemade diet, he has been yeast infection free. Store bought Dog food is nothing but poison.
Good luck!
 

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My boy is sensitive to chicken, and has environmental and flea allergies. Chicken effects his stool, and anal glands. When he is feed chicken based food or treats his stool will get progressively soft as they day goes on, and he'll butt scoot. During the warmer months he begins itching to the point that he'll scratch himself raw. Fleas make the itching so bad that allergy medicine stops helping.

I've learned to not feed him any chicken, I read the ingredients list on all his food and treats to make sure no chicken, or poultry, is in it. I've found that he does best on Candidae dry dog food. He gets a variety of brands of treats, I just make sure they are chicken free.

He's on apoquel during the warm months, but I take him off of it during the winter. So far it's kept the environmental allergies at bay. If he gets fleas he will get breakthrough itching and the apoquel is not enough. I have him on a flea preventative for the fleas and avoid bringing him around people who do not keep their pets on a preventative.

For your boy I'd start an elimination diet. Figure out what the base meats, and carbs, are in his food then prepare him a home cooked diet with different meats, and carbs cut out all treats. So if it's beef and chicken in his food, along with rice and wheat, I'd go with a 50/50 mixture of pork and sweet potatoes (avoid white potatoes as they are known to feed yeast) feed him that for around 2 weeks and see if stops the itching. Alternately you can try a limited ingredient food like Candida, Natural Balance, or Zignature to name a few of them. Just read the ingredients and make sure they do not have the main ingredients that were in the old food. Also if he is not on a flea preventative I'd put him on one on the off chance fleas are contributing to the problem. The elimination diet should help determine if the food is contributing to the itching and yeast infections.

Unrefined, cold pressed, coconut oil may also help with the yeast infection. Here's an article on coconut oil and other natural remedies you can try. It falls under the can't hurt, might help, category. https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/5-natural-solutions-for-yeast-in-dogs/

If all else fails try a PMR (prey model raw) diet. I know of at least one dog that is severely allergic to a bunch of different meat, along with fruit, vegetables, and most carbs. She only got better after the owner switched to a PMR diet. Just for the record the owner tried a lot of different limited ingredient diets, along with prescription allergy diets including the hydrolyzed one with little to no luck. If you decide to try it make sure to research it and do it right or your dog will end up with nutritional deficiencies.

I hope that at least some of what I wrote is useful to you and your dog gets better!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both for your help! I have another appointment with the vet next week. I will discuss what you two have suggest and see what she thinks is our best option. Again, thank you!!! I will keep you posted :)
 

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Here is an online article that discusses Yeast Infections that may be helpful.

Itchy, Smelly Dog? Yeast Infection May Be the Problem... by Dr. Karen Becker

https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2011

A few excerpts that I found informative:

I encourage you to put your pet on what I call an 'anti-yeast diet.
'
The beauty of an anti-yeast diet is it is also an anti-inflammatory and species-appropriate diet. Yeast needs sugar as a source of energy. Carbohydrates break down into sugar. Both MDs and veterinarians advise patients with yeast to get the sugars out of their diets.

Dietary sugar isn't just the white kind added to many pet treats and some pet foods. There are 'secret,' hidden forms of sugar that can also feed yeast overgrowth, for instance, honey. Although honey can be beneficial for pets in some cases, it does provide a food source for yeast. So if your dog is yeasty, you'll need to carefully read his pet food and treat labels and avoid any product containing honey, high fructose corn syrup, and even white potatoes and sweet potatoes.

If your dog has a significant yeast problem, I recommend you go entirely sugar-free.
Feed low-glycemic veggies. Eliminate potatoes, corn, wheat, rice – all the carbohydrates need to go away in a sugar-free diet. This is really an important step. I wish I could tell you yeast is easy to treat and avoid without addressing diet, but it isn't. Your pet needs to eat a diet that helps keep his normal flora levels healthy and balanced.

The second thing I recommend is adding some natural anti-fungal foods to his diet, like a small amount of garlic or oregano.
These foods are both anti-fungal and anti-yeast and can be beneficial in helping reduce the yeast level in your dog's body.

I also recommend anti-fungal rinses during the summer months, from one to three times per week after shampooing.
I use a gallon of water with a cup of vinegar or a cup of lemon juice. You can also use 20 drops of peppermint oil. All three will make your pooch smell nice. After shampooing with, say, a tea tree shampoo and rinsing thoroughly, follow with one of these natural anti-fungal astringent rinses to knock down the amount of yeast.

Disinfecting Yeasty Ears...

And more....
 

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A bit more from that same article:
Itchy, Smelly Dog? Yeast Infection May Be the Problem... by Dr. Karen Becker

https://healthypets.mercola.com/site...s/archive/2011

***************
How a Yeast Infection Occurs

On the immune system spectrum, balance is in the middle, and that's what you want your dog's immune function to be – balanced. An underactive immune system can lead to yeast overgrowth, because it can't control the balance. The other end of the spectrum is an overactive immune response where allergies are present. This can also lead to problems with yeast.

When a traditional veterinarian sees a dog with allergies – a sign of an overactive immune system – he or she will typically prescribe steroid therapy to shut off the immune response. (This improves symptoms but does not fix the underlying cause of the allergies.) When your dog's immune system is turned off with drugs, it can't do its job of regulating and balancing normal flora levels, so your pet ends up with yeast blooms.

When conventional vets see dogs with allergies and possibly secondary skin infections, often they prescribe antibiotics. Antibiotics are well-known to destroy all good bacteria along with the bad, wiping out healthy yeast levels in the process, so these drugs often make a bad situation worse.

Another reason an allergic dog, in particular, can end up with a lot of yeast is he can actually develop an allergy to his yeast. Intradermal tests often reveal that a dog is having an allergic response to his own natural flora.

This situation can be very problematic because the dog's allergic response can affect his whole body. These dogs are often red from the tip of the nose to the tip of the tail – their entire bodies are flaming red and irritated. So dogs with an underactive immune system or that are immuno-suppressed can end up with a yeast infection, as well as dogs that have overactive immune systems, or allergies.
 
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