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I have two 100 pound Akita/Collie mix dogs. Today on the walk we came across a possum who ran right in front of us. Both dogs started barking and whining and one of the dogs went after the other. I could not control both dogs so I released one for fear I may get bit. The dog I released did kill the possum but came back when I called. We continued on our walk but when we got back to the area where this happen they both started getting up and barking. I went into a jog and was able to readjust their attention but I am not looking forward to walking them together again. I usually do not have this experience when I walk them separately and I do walk them in prong collars. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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That's the problem of walking two untrained dogs together. They amplify each other's problems. I'd work on calm behavior individually with the dogs and then if they're ever together in a situation like the one that you experienced concentrate your commands on one dog. Have him sit while physically restraining the other. Treat him and then turn your attention to the other dog
 

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I'd remove the prong collar, as you can see it isn't doing any good and it could be making the problem worse because the dog is not only excited by the small animal, but also being hurt by the prong collar closing around his neck. My dog did bite me under that scenario; when I removed the prong collar, that problem was solved.

Other than that, Esand's advice to work on calm behavior separately is good. My dog has gone from going crazy for cats/squirrels/rabbits etc. to looking intently, but he very rarely goes nuts any more.
Training a Hyperactive Dog to Calm Down - Whole Dog Journal Article
https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/impulse-control-training-and-games-dogs
 

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There is a worrying bit in your post. You said you were scared of getting bit. By the possum or by the dog?

If you have a dog that gets to the point of excitement where he'll bite you, that needs to be your first focus. If that's the case let us know and we can reccomend some ideas.

A note on the prong collars, prongs work in two ways in my opinion, passively and actively. Passively they work as no pull harnesses. The dog pulls he gets poked. Actively is when you jerk it to give a correction or to get his attention (the difference depends on the particular dog). If the dogs are both pulling against a prong you've lost the passive benefit. They've become accustomed and it is more or less the same as having a flat buckle collar so there is no benefit to using them here. You're just further pumping up their energy level.

If you're actively using the prong to communicate with the dog you need to be doing so deliberately and it is very very hard to do so with two dogs at the same time. If you're going to walk the two dogs at once I would suggest, at the minimum, loosing one of the prong collars (if not both) and replacing it with a no pull harness. Then as I mentioned in my previous post, communicate with one dog either vocally or via the prong to get him under control while ignoring the other one (this requires you being able to physically resist one pulling dog) sit him down or lay him out and reward him for the good behavior then switch your attention to the other.

I used to walk dogs when I volunteered at a shelter. Calm dogs help. Reactive dogs seriously hamper. I could walk 8+ dogs if all of them were tranquil except for one who was was reactive, or I could walk two who were moderately reactive. When dogs are reactive and out of control you need to project calm, and you need your helpers (the other dogs) to project calm as well. If either you or the other dog(s) on the leash are frantic, the reactive dog is not likely to calm down
 

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Also, keep an eye on your dog. If he broke the skin while killing the possum he's at risk for some of the nasties that those critters carry.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was afraid of being bite by the dog. He did bite the other dog but was looking at me as well. I released him because I was in a safe location, but I may not be if this happens again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have been walking the dogs separately and I have not had any problems with either one on their own. We have walked past cats, and squirrels. I am able to see when I need to refocus. They just feed off of each other and there is no stopping it when they are together. They lived on a farm for the first few years of their life off leash and with just a look they knew where they were going. I think we will all be safer for now to separate on the walk. Thank you for your suggestions.
 

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Take advantage of your dog's high prey drive and train him to concentrate/channel all that drive towards you and you will have an extremely obedient well-trained dog! It isn't for nothing that many trainers have high drive dogs as their demonstration dogs.
 
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