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These cases are normally related to claiming behaviour. Your dog probably thinks that YOU are sleeping in HER bed and not the other way around.

First thing to do here is to ban her from the bed until she understands that it's not hers. Use a crate or let her sleep in another room. You will need to train her to get off the bed (or any other furniture she tries to claim) by command so that you don't need to push her or handle her. That will keep her from snapping at you while you adjust.

If you want to find more information, you can google "resource guarding" and that should give you the results you need.
 

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Can you explain a little more please?

Is it when you move because it disturbs her?

Is it when you get in, because she doesn't want to share?

Is it a low grumble or a full on, teeth showing snarl?

The more detail you can give, the better.
 

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Hi guys!
My dog growls at me at night. This is rare ... But it is unpleasant. She sleeps on my bed and growls if they touch her. I read an article on how to improve relationships with my dog, but that doesn't help.
What to do? Thank you.
Hey Maksim, this is, in my opinion, a territorial behavior, your dog probably thinks you're sleeping in her bed, a little more information about the dog's breed, age, how long you've had her and how long has she been sleeping in your bed would be helpful to have a clear idea on what's causing this behavior.
I would suggest crate training or at least having a separate bed for your dog, but it will take a couple of weeks until she gets used to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Can you explain a little more please?

Is it when you move because it disturbs her?

Is it when you get in, because she doesn't want to share?

Is it a low grumble or a full on, teeth showing snarl?

The more detail you can give, the better.
This is a growl, evil, but it can be easily reassured and even stroked. She growls when I toss and turn in my sleep. But not always ... And sometimes she gets out of bed in such cases. Without my team, myself. And in a minute he comes back and lays down beside me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey Maksim, this is, in my opinion, a territorial behavior, your dog probably thinks you're sleeping in her bed, a little more information about the dog's breed, age, how long you've had her and how long has she been sleeping in your bed would be helpful to have a clear idea on what's causing this behavior.
I would suggest crate training or at least having a separate bed for your dog, but it will take a couple of weeks until she gets used to it.
Dog without breed, mestizo. He lives with us for 2 years. Previously, I did not allow her to sleep on the bed ... Perhaps this is the case. Sometimes, when she growls at night, she leaves the bed and returns in a minute. Very rarely, she growls at me during the day. It happens when I hug her.
 

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Ok, first a bit about growling - a growl is an important communication from your dog and should be respected. Dogs give a series of signals that they are unhappy, but unfortunately most people don't recognise them because they can be quite subtle. To begin with there is often wide eyes, lip licking and yawning. There is also muscular tension in the body. Then the ones we sometimes do see - growl, snarl, nip then bite. If the early signals are not seen (or, in the dog's view, ignored) he won't bother with them because us stupid humans pay no attention anyway; so he may go straight to the bite. So it's important never to ignore the early signals or reprimand the dog for giving them; stopping the dog from giving them would be like taking the battery out of a smoke alarm.

So, your dog doesn't like being hugged. That is not surprising, most don't. To a dog, a hug is not a sign of affection, it is a restraint and they can feel trapped and vulnerable. So please stop doing that. In fact, for any touching I suggest the five second rule. Stroke her for five seconds then stop. Only if she initiates further contact by nudging you or similar, continue for another five seconds then stop again. Continue only for as long as she keeps asking. That gives her control and in turn that will build her confidence at being touched.

I also agree with the others that you would all be happier if she had her own bed - make a really lovely bed perhaps at the side of yours and lure her to it with a reward. When she is in the bed, praise and reward heavily. The idea is that being in her own bed is awesome because it brings such wonderful rewards. Keep doing that until she uses her own bed in preference to yours.

This may help.


 

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Yeah, it seems this is the cause, I've noticed the same behavior in my dog when a client's dog sleeps in her crate, she too leaves and comes back growling a few moments later.
Just get her a bed and put a shirt or something with your smell on it and a favorite toy in there and she'll be ok in a couple of weeks max.
Good luck
 

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Ok, first a bit about growling - a growl is an important communication from your dog and should be respected. Dogs give a series of signals that they are unhappy, but unfortunately most people don't recognise them because they can be quite subtle. To begin with there is often wide eyes, lip licking and yawning. There is also muscular tension in the body. Then the ones we sometimes do see - growl, snarl, nip then bite. If the early signals are not seen (or, in the dog's view, ignored) he won't bother with them because us stupid humans pay no attention anyway; so he may go straight to the bite. So it's important never to ignore the early signals or reprimand the dog for giving them; stopping the dog from giving them would be like taking the battery out of a smoke alarm.

So, your dog doesn't like being hugged. That is not surprising, most don't. To a dog, a hug is not a sign of affection, it is a restraint and they can feel trapped and vulnerable. So please stop doing that. In fact, for any touching I suggest the five second rule. Stroke her for five seconds then stop. Only if she initiates further contact by nudging you or similar, continue for another five seconds then stop again. Continue only for as long as she keeps asking. That gives her control and in turn that will build her confidence at being touched.

I also agree with the others that you would all be happier if she had her own bed - make a really lovely bed perhaps at the side of yours and lure her to it with a reward. When she is in the bed, praise and reward heavily. The idea is that being in her own bed is awesome because it brings such wonderful rewards. Keep doing that until she uses her own bed in preference to yours.

This may help.


Thanks so much for the advice.
 

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Yeah, it seems this is the cause, I've noticed the same behavior in my dog when a client's dog sleeps in her crate, she too leaves and comes back growling a few moments later.
Just get her a bed and put a shirt or something with your smell on it and a favorite toy in there and she'll be ok in a couple of weeks max.
Good luck
Thanks so much for the advice.
 
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