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My dog has recently been diagnosed with colitis. She has had two quite serious bouts with it and some minor ones thrown in. She has seen two vets (both with excellent reputations) and the treatment suggested has been the same:
1. Short Term.....Treated with medication...can't remember the name but starts with M and is what most dogs seem to take for intestinal problems.

2. Long Term....diet changed to W/D with probotics mixed into morning meal

She is doing remarkably well, but I have a question about so many posts being highly critical of the Prescription Diets. My dog does beautifully on W/D. All my earlier dogs have been on one kind of Rx diet or another: T/D, K/D, H/D and I/D and all have done well.

I cannot imagine that good vets would prescribe a dog food that is inferior in quality and not healthy for dogs.

I would appreciate hearing posters' reasons for their objections to Rx diets and why they believe that the W/D is harmful to my dog.

Thanks.
 

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W/D as in Hill's Science Diet? That stuff is absolute garbage.

I cannot imagine that good vets would prescribe a dog food that is inferior in quality and not healthy for dogs.
They prescribe inferior and unhealthy foods because they are paid to do so by the companies that make the food. That's not just conjecture. It has been confirmed over and over by veterinarians both online and those I know personally.

I would appreciate hearing posters' reasons for their objections to Rx diets and why they believe that the W/D is harmful to my dog.
Aside from the prescription being a literal payoff for the vet? Let's take a look at the ingredients...

First three are filler.
Wheat and corn being the first two, very little nutritional value and both huge allergens and both contribute to Colitis and other GI diseases/disorders.

Third ingredient is powdered cellulose, which is plant fiber that not only has zero nutritional value, but is also entirely non-digestible.

Then finally some meat, chicken meal, which is still a potential allergen... but really the only good thing in this food.

All of the other ingredients are literally just filler and vitamins/additives.

Take into account that pet food ingredients labels are read the same as human foods. The first ingredient is what there is the most of in the food, then second, third, etc. So there is a very high quantity of filler and very little actual meat. So... this is a food supposedly meant to help GI issues, and is made up of almost entirely ingredients that cause GI issues...
 

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ive a dog with colitis and ive not put her on prescription food at all not that i could if i wanted to because of her food allergies and intolerances etc. instead i get some barley grains from bulk section of supermarket and i cook some in boiling water for 3 hours or until very soft drain the barley water into container and let cool down. The grains i keep in the drain and expose to sunlight for two days so once i used up the water (i give 50ml a day till gone then use the grains small spoonful) really helps Jessies colitis and its so cheap rememdy! really calms it down and firms up her poo and back to normal.
 

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you just need low fat healthy dry food or low fat raw food if you were to go down that avenue. Jessie the dog who has colitis (avater) is on novel protein low fat raw food. With occasional barley water/grains when get flare up.
 

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WEll, I for one love W/D… feed it to all my dogs, and treat many of my clients (particularly the ones with colitis and diabetes) with it with excellent success. Many nutritionists (including those NOT hired or paid by food companies) recommend high fiber diets (always include M/D along with similar diets from other companies) for these diseases because they work. I do NOT work for any food companies and I like any diet for a dog that is well balanced and supplies them with the nutrition they need… I get no kickbacks or anything of the sort… home made diets are great if they work, too… but I like what works best, and in my hands, W/D is one of the most effective diets there are. Not sure I like it for cats except for a few specific circumstances, but in dogs it can be a life saver. Not for every dog of course (though I have found it makes a great diet for my disease-free dogs). Every one is a food expert, but few I find really know what they are talking about. As a vet I do NOT consider myself a food expert by a long shot, but I do have a lot of experience with many different diets, and though my ideas about what works best does change from time to time, I like when I get good results and have had many canine patients do very well on this or that diet… so those are diets I recommend.

PS corn is a very nutritious food item and is one of the least commonly implicated ingredients for causing food allergies. Wheat is a tad more common.. . but all pale relative to the more common meat ingredients, and to soy as far as proving to be the cause of a dog's food allergies.
 

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@lzrddr Even as a vet, I encourage you to do some more education on dogs' nutritional requirements. Corn is widely known as one of the most common allergens for dogs. It is also, even for humans, nutrient-deficient; it's essentially only good for fiber. The most common protein allergen is chicken. Few dogs are allergic to other proteins and a lot of dogs are allergic to many different grains and other fillers. Any food that is over 80% filler, like Hill's, I cannot see as being balanced. Dogs require protein. They do not require grains, filler, or even produce. You can only speak from your personal experiences. Other people speak from experience and years of research on this specific subject. Hill's is one of the lowest-quality brands of dog food out there...
 

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in one of the most recent studies provided at a dermatologic seminar in veterinary medicine, the following summary was presented:

out of 100 food allergic dogs, 95% were allergic to beef, 55% to dairy, 42% to wheat, 24% to chicken, 18% to egg, 13% to lamb, 13% to soy, 7% to corn, 7% to pork, 6% to fish and 5% to rice (obviously many dogs were allergic to more than one ingredient). Now of course if you want to disagree with the nations top veterinary dermatologists, I don't really know what to say, but it would nice to see your documentation. This information was provided by Dr. Kimberly Coyner, Diplomate in Veterinary Dermatology (here is a web site: dermvetvegas.com).

Found another chart for cats: out of 56 food allergic cats, 16% were allergic to beef, 16% to dairy, 13% to fish, 4% to lamb, 3% to wheat, 3% to corn and 2% to egg. This is another chart provided at a veterinary conference during a dermatology lecture.

Here is an excerpt from the text on Small Animal Nutrition (4th edition): "Corn is a nutritionally superior grain compared to others used in pet foods because it contains a balance of nutrients not found in other grains. Corn provides a highly available source of complex carbohydrates and substantial quantities of linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid important for healthy skin. Corn also provides essential amino acids and fiber. In a survey of veterinary dermatologists, corn was not listed among the ingredients most often suspected to cause food allergies. A review of over 200 confirmed canine cases of food allergy in the veterinary literature revealed only three were caused by corn. The same number was reported for rice."

But of course if you would rather believe a gimmicky ad by Blue Dog Food instead of a group of specialists whose livelihood is veterinary dermatology or a well known text on small animal nutrition, there is little I could tell you that you believe anyway, so there is little reason to go on.
 

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But of course if you would rather believe a gimmicky ad by Blue Dog Food instead of a group of specialists whose livelihood is veterinary dermatology or a well known text on small animal nutrition, there is little I could tell you that you believe anyway, so there is little reason to go on.
The best thing that can be said about Blue Buffalo is that they use by-products. LOL.
 

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