Dog Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I haven't posted here in a while, but we've just been living life. Yogi has been overall a very healthy and active little dog and I just adore him. He is only about 13 pounds.

I've been suffering from a dental neuropathy for a while, and chewing gum gave me a lot of relief from the pain. I knew sugar free gum was poisonous, but didn't know HOW very poisonous it was! So I did try to keep the gum away from my dog, and it didn't seem to be an issue, not like he was trying to get to it. If I had any idea of how poisonous it was....

This morning I had a very old sick chicken that had to be put down, and the neighbor came by to pick it up. I stuck my dog in my room while he was here as he dislikes that neighbor, and I had enough on my plate. While he was in my room, he found a half of a package of gum on the nightstand (Trident) and demolished it. I didn't discover what had happened until 2 hours later, when I saw the evidence on my bed. At that time Yogi appeared completely normal.

We immediately took him to the emergency vet, they induced vomiting and did recover a lot of gum and paper. It's 9 hours later, he's had two blood glucose readings that were within normal ranges. But his platelet count is very low (I believe it was 38,000), which is concerning, but they are not sure why it is so low. He apparently is still acting normal at this time.

I'm just sitting here sick, sick with worry. This dog is my baby, like the kid I never had. I know you guys can understand. There will be no more gum in this household, or anything else sugar-free for that matter! I don't know if anyone can give my any idea of what to expect? I'm hoping to pick him up in the morning, but it seems like there is still quite a period of time before he is out of the woods. Has anyone been through this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,646 Posts
Oh no!! I'm soo sorry, and hope thatYogi will be alright.

Xylitol scares the heck, it takes very little of it to kill a dog and it's in so many problems. I really think that should have to put contains Xylitol in neon letters on the front of the package of every product that contains it.

From what I'm reading it does sound like Yogi will probably be O.K. so long as his liver remains good... Xylitol Toxicity in Dogs | VCA Animal Hospitals

Don't be too upset with yourself, you had no way of knowing that he'd do something so out of character ((((HUGS)))))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hi Rain, I remember you and your little chihuahua--Zola? Hope she is well.

Yogi is back home again this morning! So far it is looking good, his last blood panel was all within normal ranges, except for platelets, but they are back up to 138,000 (almost bottom of normal range) so that is fantastic. He has been pretty spunky and even wanted his ball, but I think he is settling down now.

There is still a small chance of liver failure in the next 48 hours (it can happen even without a low blood sugar crisis), so we have to keep an eye on him and have a bit more testing in 3 days or so. Needless to say, the vet bill is humongous (24 hours stay, 2 blood panels, many blood glucose tests, drugs, etc..etc..) but I told my husband that is the price of my sanity.

For anyone who doesn't know (like I didn't)--

Xylitol in incredibly poisonous to dogs, way worse than chocolate!

One small stick of Trident gum can put a 13 lb. dog into hypoglycemic shock, even kill it if blood sugar goes low enough.

10 sticks are enough to bring on acute liver failure and death in a 13 lb dog.

Xylitol is in all kinds of products, stuff you wouldn't think of, and the sweetness is appealing to dogs.

I agree--labeling should be much more obvious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks spots, so far, so good. I'm supposed to keep a close eye on him for another day (72 hours post ingestion), as there is still a chance of acute liver failure. But he seems very happy and active, wants to play ball as much as ever.

My vet said that it is likely he will have some liver damage, that will show up on his next round of blood testing (on Saturday). But fortunately the liver can regenerate. He could also have some kidney damage which would unfortunately be permanent, but hopefully not enough to affect his quality of life.

I'm totally hovering over him, and working on cleaning house! I'm just absolutely paranoid that one little stick of gum fell out of my clothing or purse and is hiding somewhere. At least the house will get a good going-over which is very much needs!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Just wanted to post an update--I got the recent blood test results back, and his liver enzymes are completely in the normal range. His kidneys also look good. The vet thinks I dodged a bullet by getting him to vomit it all out, and that most of the xylitol was bound up in the gum.

His white blood cell count is a bit low, but that can be from stress, which her certainly has had! Platelets are in the normal range again. I'm just so happy and relieved!

I'm done with artificial and even so called "natural" sweeteners like this. If that tiny amount can kill a dog, I don't trust it in my body.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
making conclusions like that across species does not always work.. we are not dogs, just like dogs are not cats. What is safe for one species can be deadly for another, thanks to missing enzyme pathways or ways the liver functions differently. Tylenol is a pretty 'safe' pain medication for people, but deadly toxic to cats, though not dogs. Advil is considered one of the 'safer' pain meds, but can easily kill a dog at the same dose people take. Some frequently taken bladder meds for people will kill a dog. Yet several dog medications have severe reactions in people while seem completely safe for dogs. Turns out dogs and cats lack the enzymes to metabolize xylitol properly, which we do not. Other artificial sweeteners do not have this same warning in pets and seem, so far, very safe (such as Splenda and Nutrasweet). Still, it is always best to be cautious if not certain what a dog or cat can tolerate.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top