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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We got Molly in June 2018, and we'd had one dog before that - Phoebe. My dad had some problems with the hair with Phoebe, but I think it's even worse now. What should we do? I want to groom her once or twice a day, but it's always shoved down the list of priorities, it seems. I admit, I don't groom her very often, but I am trying to get better at it! Anyway, we sometimes get under the couches with the broom and on those days it is better, but she sheds so much that in the next day or two, it's like we never cleaned it.

I bathe her on average once a month, and I do use soap. Could it be that I'm using a cheaper brand? Is all the hair and dander normal? What more can I do to make it more bearable for my dad? It's to the point where he can't even hang in the living room because he can't breathe, and when he's tired, it's even worse.

Is there anything I can do, or is rehoming the best option? Is it just the lack of grooming, or the baths?
 

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Perhaps your dad should see an allergist. That he is not able to breathe is pretty severe and there is the potential that it might get worse. Perhaps he has other allergies as well, and perhaps he can undergo Allergen Immunotherapy which could help not only the situation with your dog, but your dad's overall quality of life.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, his allergies are pretty bad. He sneezes, coughs, and has trouble breathing easily. He's allergic to a lot of stuff, plants, all animals with fur, I think, and probably more. This is why I'm not sure even lots of grooming will help him much...I'm wondering if rehoming is the only option to help him.
 

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Chances are your dad is allergic to the proteine in the dog dander (skin cells) or the protein in your dog's saliva. Daily grooming and vacuuming will help, but I doubt that this will be the answer alone. Does your dad take any allergy medication? Sometimes the brand you used for a while can become less effective, and you can speak to the pharmacist to find another brand to try. In a few years you can go back and try the old brand again.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Chances are your dad is allergic to the proteine in the dog dander (skin cells) or the protein in your dog's saliva. Daily grooming and vacuuming will help, but I doubt that this will be the answer alone. Does your dad take any allergy medication? Sometimes the brand you used for a while can become less effective, and you can speak to the pharmacist to find another brand to try. In a few years you can go back and try the old brand again.
He's allergic to both, I think. If Molly licks him, and he rubs his eye, it gets itchy and we have to flush it to stop it. But as for medication, I don't think he does, but I just can't see him needing to take any for the sake of my dog. When I say that, I mean that when I got her, I paid for half. I was one of the only ones who wanted a dog. Maybe that was a bad decision, and now I'm paying for it.
 

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Please get your dad to talk to his doctor about his allergies. The doctor can then refer him to an allergist. You said your dad also has allergies to some plants and other animals. Your dad may even need some inhalers to keep him from having a severe medical event with his breathing problems!!!!

I am guessing rehoming your dog will help somewhat if you can't keep the dander in the home to a minimum! However, your dad can't live in a bubble. That's why I am thinking trying to get him desensitized with Immunotherapy is a better long-term solution for him, or he should at least consider taking some allergy medication to keep his body from reacting to the allergens!!!
 

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I did allergen immunotherapy and it's the best thing I did... it took over 10 years but now I can be around dogs and cats without any problem, and I make sure to wash my hands after petting the pets. I still occasionally get a rash when my new dog licks my hands (but not the other ones), but it's also because my hands are very dry. And yes, rubbing my eyes after petting the cat is a no no (but zyrtec helps with that).


Anyway, your dad seems miserable and he should really see an allergist anyway. But yes, if you're serious about keeping your dog, you need to brush him every day, sweep/vaccuum every day, and possibly bathe him every week.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Well, he's not severe with anything but animals, as far as I know...I've never ever heard of him having a reaction with plants, so I'm not sure to what extent he even is allergic. I just feel so incredibly guilty about making him go to an allergist because of my dog. And, no, he doesn't live in a bubble, it's mainly in our living room that he has problems. He's fine, say, in the basement. I don't think he's ever been to an allergist, or had any therapy. I'll tell my mom what you guys said, and see what she thinks.

I'm not dead set against rehoming her if it's better for my dad, but my family also thinks her being an outside dog would be great. What do you think? I personally, don't really think it would be very good for her. I don't think it'd be good for her at all. She's a really clingy, "stay with my human" (me) dog type, and she hates being outside alone. She scratches at the door and has ruined our weather stripping a few times. My dad covered it with a trim piece, and it worked for a while, but I think she may have figured out how to get it again. She eats a lot of socks and other stuff and drives my mom crazy, and with my dad's allergies, (If she does end up going outside, I can't help feeling that rehoming is just a better option.) it feels like we're just not right for her, which is sad. I'm not quite as connected to Molly as I was with Phoebe, but it would still be really hard to see her go.

What do you think? Going outside doesn't sound that great for her personality type, and Dad's allergies are a problem inside.

One thing we've considered trying again (We did it for a couple months when we got her, but we felt bad for her and felt she wasn't getting enough attention, so we let her have the living room, dining room, etc. (no kitchen), but the hair and dander is bad.) is training her to stay on the front door mat. Would that contain a lot of the hair and dander and make it more breathable for my dad, or should we just rehome? I'm really at war with myself here.
 

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Dogs are social beings, and being made to stay outside would be a very unhappy existence for her in my opinion.

All her behavior problems you describe can be taken care of with training. Pick an issue and look in the stickies on the forum. There is so much information here. You can also start a thread with a particular issue you want help with and forum members will help where they can.
Training a dog is a lot of fun and very rewarding.

You should not feel bad or guilty for bringing a dog into your family's home. Your parents are adults and had the opportunity to say no. Now they need to decide if your dad's allergies are severe enough that changes need to be made. To either rehome the dog (he deserves a happy life too), or for your dad to take medications or get immunotherapy. Any of these choices are good choices to change things for the better! :)
 

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Hey Hippophile.

It might be worth a try looking for a Homeopathic Pharmacy. My experience with homeopathic allergy relief was positive. My allergy is to plants, but the process of taking/administering homeopathic remedies for animal allergies is probably similar.

The person takes the remedy before being exposed to the source, when one is breathing normally and not itchy, scratchy or sneezy. The remedy, often a small tab, is dissolved under the tongue and absorbed into the blood stream and stimulates the bodies natural defenses to counteract the invading agents.

It's a gentle stimulation that serves to kind of jump start ones natural defenses.
People that dispense natural remedies can be pretty knowledgeable; it's not all witchcraft and crystals and a smart one can help get things under control.
Additionally, it's relatively inexpensive and you don't need to schedule an appointment.

I feel for your Dad. I've been carrying a handkerchief or bandanna in my pocket for over 50 years. Allergy attacks are no fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My dad already has to take an assortment of pills and medications, and when I told my mom what you've all said, she said he shouldn't need to, and I guiltily agree with her.

As for the training, yes, I know those can be fixed, but I'm not sure what to do to teach her. I have looked at many websites trying to help it, and not much seems to work...I will check out the stickies :)
 

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I completely understand your mom's reply! My husband has to take quite a number of medications as well, among them a few for allergies and inhalers for asthma. We are lucky that our dogs are not triggers for his breathing problem.
We have no carpets in the house, and one of our dogs is a short haired mini dachshund, and the other a poodle mix.

Your dad's health is the most important, so if his allergies can't be managed then it is best to re-home the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I completely understand your mom's reply! My husband has to take quite a number of medications as well, among them a few for allergies and inhalers for asthma. We are lucky that our dogs are not triggers for his breathing problem.
We have no carpets in the house, and one of our dogs is a short haired mini dachshund, and the other a poodle mix.

Your dad's health is the most important, so if his allergies can't be managed then it is best to re-home the dog.
Thank you for understanding. However, last night, I remembered that nutrition can cause shedding. I'll confess she's not on a fantastic diet (Purina), but I convinced my mom last night to pay like $40 - $50 a bag for a higher quality, as well as a better shampoo. Do you have any of either you guys recommend that I can find in Canada for a reasonable price (within the budget)? As for the shampoo, I'll pay $30 or whatever for a good one. I also realized I may have been bathing her too often. When we got Phoebe, I'd heard online that bathing once a month was okay. I guess I turned that into, "It's GREAT!" So I did, with her and Molly. Should I only be bathing her when she stinks?
 

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Good nutrition can help with shedding, but this is part of owning a dog, dogs shed! The longer the hair, the more you see it, the bigger the dog, the more of it! The only dogs where there is considerably less shedding are the breeds that are non shedding, like poodles for example, and mixes with them.

Bathing the dogs is good now and then, but every time you bathe the dog, you disrupt their natural oily skin barrier. You can cause problems like dry and flaky skin for your dog when you give too many baths, or baths with poor quality dog shampoos.
Dry skin can crack and then bacteria and fungus can settle in! Those will then cause suffering for your dog and need medical treatment!

I have bought Vet's Best Hypoallergenic dog shampoo for my dogs. It is good quality and does not cost too much. I think I paid about 18 CAD.
If you do a search on best dog shampoos there are a number of them you can choose from. Not all of them are available on Amazon.ca though!

If you like bathing your dog, then once every 1-2 months is plenty!

In regards to your previous concern about training, once you have checked the stickies on the forums here, also try you-tube. I have found Zak George very positive and helpful. Another sensible one you can check out is Sympawtico. Both treat their dogs with dignity! Watch out for the ones that are rough with the animal, you don't want to force your dog to do something for you, you want to get the dog to want to do something for you! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good nutrition can help with shedding, but this is part of owning a dog, dogs shed! The longer the hair, the more you see it, the bigger the dog, the more of it! The only dogs where there is considerably less shedding are the breeds that are non shedding, like poodles for example, and mixes with them.

Bathing the dogs is good now and then, but every time you bathe the dog, you disrupt their natural oily skin barrier. You can cause problems like dry and flaky skin for your dog when you give too many baths, or baths with poor quality dog shampoos.
Dry skin can crack and then bacteria and fungus can settle in! Those will then cause suffering for your dog and need medical treatment!

I have bought Vet's Best Hypoallergenic dog shampoo for my dogs. It is good quality and does not cost too much. I think I paid about 18 CAD.
If you do a search on best dog shampoos there are a number of them you can choose from. Not all of them are available on Amazon.ca though!

If you like bathing your dog, then once every 1-2 months is plenty!

In regards to your previous concern about training, once you have checked the stickies on the forums here, also try you-tube. I have found Zak George very positive and helpful. Another sensible one you can check out is Sympawtico. Both treat their dogs with dignity! Watch out for the ones that are rough with the animal, you don't want to force your dog to do something for you, you want to get the dog to want to do something for you! :thumbsup:
I love Zak's videos! He's usually my go-to trainer for YouTube, to be honest. He was the one I watched mainly before getting Molly, for the basic trainings and then some other stuff :p

Thanks for the advice! My aunt recommends NutriSource. She also has a lab whose shedding apparently decreased a lot once she started eating it. Do you recommend it?
 

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Hard situation. I feel for all of you guys!

I would definitely not want to keep Miss Molly outside full time! Not a nice life for a dog. Dogs thrive on human interaction. For most dogs, we are their world!! Just look at how happy they are when we come home! Plus being outside all the time is not super safe for most dogs. There is weather to consider (heat and cold, rain, thunder, etc) also many exclusively outdoor dogs get very bored and them become destructive or run away/escape their yards to entertain themselves or work off their stress. Not safe at all.

Just as food for thought--- I had a really long term employee for years who was extremely allergic to my shop cats...at first. She could barely breathe in the beginning without her inhaler and allergy meds, as she also had asthma, etc.

But---within a few months she acclimated to our cats and she continued to work in our shop along with our super friendly two cats. She even was able to pet them and have them rub up on her. She did continue her meds I think (cannot remember now) but she was fine for years after the first couple of months!!!

Maybe you could talk to your parents about a trial run with Dad taking some OTC allergy meds (or homeopathic remedies) for a few months and then reevaluate before rehoming your dog? Rehoming a dog is hard on the dog (and you) so I suggest trying multiple things before coming to that hard decision if at all possible.

Also, what about fish oil supplements? Or Gelatin capsules? Don't those promote a better coat and less shedding? Maybe look into it or ask your vet?

Thank you for wanting to make it work! We here can certainly help you with training issues and getting the success you want with your dog.

Just ask us anything and study, study,study! And practice, practice, practice. And have fun with your dog while doing so! That is what works for me and my three beloved doggies!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hey guys? I had a talk with some of my older family members and they all think that rehoming is the only option. I think, if nothing works, it is, but first I want to do some stuff. First off, can NutriSource help with the shedding, and does anybody use it? Second, I know the FURminator works, but if I can get my mom to buy this (I haven't mentioned it yet.), should I go for the short hair with a goldador? Do you guys recommend it? I don't want to give her up at all, it would break my heart, I'm sure. Do these things work?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Good nutrition can help with shedding, but this is part of owning a dog, dogs shed! The longer the hair, the more you see it, the bigger the dog, the more of it! The only dogs where there is considerably less shedding are the breeds that are non shedding, like poodles for example, and mixes with them.

Bathing the dogs is good now and then, but every time you bathe the dog, you disrupt their natural oily skin barrier. You can cause problems like dry and flaky skin for your dog when you give too many baths, or baths with poor quality dog shampoos.
Dry skin can crack and then bacteria and fungus can settle in! Those will then cause suffering for your dog and need medical treatment!

I have bought Vet's Best Hypoallergenic dog shampoo for my dogs. It is good quality and does not cost too much. I think I paid about 18 CAD.
If you do a search on best dog shampoos there are a number of them you can choose from. Not all of them are available on Amazon.ca though!

If you like bathing your dog, then once every 1-2 months is plenty!

In regards to your previous concern about training, once you have checked the stickies on the forums here, also try you-tube. I have found Zak George very positive and helpful. Another sensible one you can check out is Sympawtico. Both treat their dogs with dignity! Watch out for the ones that are rough with the animal, you don't want to force your dog to do something for you, you want to get the dog to want to do something for you! :thumbsup:
Sorry for double posting, can't figure this all out...^^ :)
 
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