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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

looking for some advice.

In my old house he used to be allowed on the sofa would be glued to my other half (Bear is obsessed with him). He would sit on him/over him /next to him until I came in from making a drink and he’d moving into my space and I told him
To move.. (didn’t touch him) (1st growl)

moved into our new house and I told my partner I don’t want the dogs on the sofa, agreed.
so lastnight I was letting all the dogs out for wees and Bear was laying on the rug so I stood near the front of him and said “come on move” nothing he stayed put.. so I walked around the side near his rear and said (move sternly) he then growled at me (I stood Back he got up and sat on my partners foot staring at me.

I’ve always been more strict with the dogs where as my boyfriend will let them in his personal space and kind of treats them like children. When he’s in work their pretty well behaved and calm until he walks in the door and the dogs go mad and start playing up.


I think Bear thinks he’s the boss of us both (I’m not push over with him) but now im
Concerned that this growl will lead to something else.
 

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You are right about the growl.

The growl is an important communication from your dog and should be respected.

Dogs give a series of signals that they are unhappy, but unfortunately most people don't recognise them because they can be quite subtle. To begin with there is often wide eyes, lip licking and yawning. There is also muscular tension in the body. Then the ones we sometimes do see - growl, snarl, nip then bite. If the early signals are not seen (or, in the dog's view, ignored) he won't bother with them because us stupid humans pay no attention anyway; so he may go straight to the bite. So it's important never to ignore the early signals or reprimand the dog for giving them; stopping the dog from giving them would be like taking the battery out of a smoke alarm.

The other part of this is that it seems to be happening when you try to move him. He is probably settled and comfortable and although you know there is a good reason for moving him, he doesn't. So, can you lure him with something like roast chicken or frankfurter sausage? No fuss, no drama, everybody wins.

And, just a word on him being boss - that won't be what he is thinking, dogs really don't think that way. It really will just be he is having to move from his comfortable place. The whole dominance, alpha thing has been proven to be completely wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You are right about the growl.

The growl is an important communication from your dog and should be respected.

Dogs give a series of signals that they are unhappy, but unfortunately most people don't recognise them because they can be quite subtle. To begin with there is often wide eyes, lip licking and yawning. There is also muscular tension in the body. Then the ones we sometimes do see - growl, snarl, nip then bite. If the early signals are not seen (or, in the dog's view, ignored) he won't bother with them because us stupid humans pay no attention anyway; so he may go straight to the bite. So it's important never to ignore the early signals or reprimand the dog for giving them; stopping the dog from giving them would be like taking the battery out of a smoke alarm.

The other part of this is that it seems to be happening when you try to move him. He is probably settled and comfortable and although you know there is a good reason for moving him, he doesn't. So, can you lure him with something like roast chicken or frankfurter sausage? No fuss, no drama, everybody wins.

And, just a word on him being boss - that won't be what he is thinking, dogs really don't think that way. It really will just be he is having to move from his comfortable place. The whole dominance, alpha thing has been proven to be completely wrong.
 
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