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Miley, 7 months, staffy/beagle mix
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I'm a new member here. In the beginning of December I adopted a 6 month old Staffy/beagle mix. I've been working really hard at trying to train her. She was already house and crate trained, which was great. But she's just so overly hyper all the time. She goes insane in the window at the squirrels and the birds constantly. I take her on 3-4 walks a day, play fetch several times, other games like tug of war, several short training sessions with training treats. But even after all that, she's still bouncing off the walls every day. Plus, she also is still doing the puppy biting. She's already ripped several of my shirts and pants. Don't get me wrong, she's awesome with other things. Great with other people and dogs. I've taken her to a very large, wooded dog park near me, and she's always amazing there. I'm just looking for some thoughts and ideas for managing her abundance of energy.
 

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For the window thing, the more she does this the better she will get at it so I’d suggest blocking her line of sight. You can get opaque film that clings (rather than sticks, so it comes off easily and can be reused) which would obscure her view.

For the other hyper-ness, well, she is an adolescent! Rather than trying to tire her, which will just make her even more fit and even harder to tire, I’d suggest upping the training to tire her brain. You will find that tires her even more than physical exercise. Have a look on YouTube for Kikopup, she has loads of great training videos from basic manners to cool tricks. You could also get her into something like scent work, which makes her use her brain but won’t ramp up her energy levels.

For mouthing, you need to get on top of that now, because as an adult she needs to stop using her mouth for engagement. She is almost certainly trying to engage with you so try to redirect her on to a toy. If that doesn’t work, the clearest way to give the message that ’teeth on skin/clothes = end of fun’ is to immediately walk out. Use a house line to draw her off your leg or clothes if necessary. But it has to be consistent; every person, every time.
 

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Here is some help with the puppy-biting. Joanne is right, you need to get that stopped immediately. It's very important that you approach it the right way, though. Joanne's advice is one good approach, and the videos will give you more information.
And, if you check Kikopup's other videos you will find a lot of excellent training advice for puppies and dogs for other things as well. She is a very good resource.

 

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When my border collie was a pup with a ton of energy, I would focus on giving him activities that required him to 'slow down' and 'think'. Interactive food toys such as frozen Kongs, (all or part of his meals were fed in Kongs) or snuffle mats, skills such as go to a mat (and stay until released- endurance built up over time), and a settle cue (generalized in a variety of locations) stay and wait, play games such as : 101 Things to Do with a Box | Karen Pryor Clicker Training, taking him on 'sniff' walks on a long line where he could explore the world with his nose, or simply tossing kibble treats on the lawn or in the snow for him to wander about and find.

I did find that once he was able to use up some of his excess (over the top) energy the biting, nipping became less of a problem for him.
 
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Miley, 7 months, staffy/beagle mix
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am using a snuffle mat, along with a few other food puzzles I found on Amazon. Nothing seems to slow her down. For example, we've been going since 6am this morning. Long walk, 2 games of fetch in the back yard, a bit of training with treats, she had her breakfast from the snuffle mat. Then, I went out for 10 minutes to the convenience store. When I got back, she had torn up a pillow.
 

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Hang in there. It does get better. As for the pillow, the best thing to do with that kind of behavior is to puppy-proof the house, or at least a portion of it where you can leave the dog. Crate training would be good, too, and then you could crate him if you were only popping out for a short time.
 
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