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Last night my 1 year old dog, who is trained to pee outside, jumped on the bed, went right over to my husband who was laying down, walked up to the top of the bed and peed right on his head and pillow. This has never happened before, but why would he do that?
 

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Territory thing? Is he neutered? Could he have been angry or upset with him? Was your husband somewhere new and could have smelled like new or different other animals?
At the local dog park there are some dogs that pee on people, always males. One is young and owner is trying to train, the others the owners don't seem to care or correct at all. Must be fun going to their houses! One dog pees on people and other dogs! The other dogs don't look impressed but just moved away. He's a very energetic lab golden mix so maybe just very excited but it's very obnoxious. My dog still played a lot with him even after getting peed on but was rougher than usual and other dog didn't try it again with him so maybe they talked it out in dog language. He still pees on people and other dogs though. Yuck.

I don't understand that particular behavior as thankfully I've never had a dog that did that. I would do whatever I could to stop it fast though.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

Generally, when this happens, you'll find it's a result of either excitement or anxiety and that the dog's house training needs to be revisited. As far as we are aware, dogs don't think "I'll get you back for that", and they don't plan things i.e., "I'm just going to go upstairs, find Dad and pee on him".

Years ago, I looked after a Labradoodle (2yr old) for a friend of my wife whilst she went on holiday. As she dropped him off she told me that he "dribbled a bit" when you first saw/greeted him, i.e., in the morning/when you'd been out. This dog proceeded to pee everywhere.

I re-did house training with him - from scratch. Any time he peed "where I wanted", he got a BIG fuss and was rewarded - this included when we were out on a walk and playing outside. I had to take more care when greeting him and initially, just get him outside before I touched him. When he was picked up to go home, he was fine.

Your dog's still quite young, if it were me, I'd look at the house training side. Big fuss and reward when he goes where and when you want him to. Play with him and give him free run of the house WHEN YOU KNOW HE'S EMPTY, otherwise, keep an eye on him.
 

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Lol who knows? I've heard lots of people say dogs dont "get you back " or some such.....but who really knows?
My friend had a dog who would pee in certain people's shoes, and I myself had a totally housetrained dog who, the very first time a woman I started dating came over, started harassing her, which was totally out of character for him, and then while looking me straight in the eye, literally holding eye contact, squatted and took a crap right in the middle of the living room floor. It sounds crazy but it really happened. She never did along along well with that dog lol.
Dogs do weird things sometimes. All I could think was maybe it was just his way of telling me he didnt approve lol
 

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I agree. I know what people say that dogs and cats don't plan and don't act out of spite or anger or guilt. Well I've had many animals for many years and I've observed a lot and new research comes out all the time and scientists are just now figuring out that dogs and horses and cats are a lot smarter than people thought. They have longer memories, capacity for humanlike emotions, pass tests that show logical thoughts, deductive reasoning and abstract thinking and more complicated language and ways of communication with each other and ways of figuring out how to read our facial expressions, body language and words than we understood for decades. Moreover they're far more adept at training us to do what they want than most people would like to admit.
One study showed a group of horses learned how to press all kinds of levers to get either food or shocks. They could deductively deduce which lever looked like the good levers that got food or the bad levers that got shocks and showed other abstract reasoning skills from other tests. They were at the testing place once for the first time and never went back for ten years. Went back ten years later and all remembered everything they'd learned after ten years with no practice in ten years.
Cats have been discovered to have brains most similar to humans physically and structurally, it's tough to tell what they're capable of because they don't care about pleasing the testers or getting rewards so have no motivation to succeed.
Dogs can and do play tricks on each other and people socially all the time and show a sense of humor. They get angry and don't like certain people and they definitely get jealous and perceive unfair treatment. Why wouldn't they react to a situation they don't like or a person they're angry with by doing a forbidden bad behavior to express anger, or insecurity/jealousy by marking their territory by peeing on the person they're feeling insecure about or angry at? I've seen several dogs at the local dog park who are reportedly housebroken, one is 7 years old, one is 2 or 3, others are a bit younger or I don't know, pee on people. One also pees on other dogs.
My childhood cat that I had for twenty years was very devoted to me. She and my mom had a love hate relationship. She always peed on my mom's clothes and stuff, never mine. When my dad came to visit on weekends he and my mom would frequently argue and I'd get upset. That cat figured out that when he visited there were arguments and yelling and lots of stress and chaos and she'd then have to be my therapy cat or emotional support cat for days afterward and she quickly learned to associate my dad with negative emotions and stress. She started peeing in his shoes every visit, then in his suitcase, usually both. He started keeping his stuff outside the apartment on the stairway landing vestibule and even hidden in the closet and hiding it in a spare room, all areas she didn't have access to as an indoor cat. Every single visit she somehow found a way to sneak out and find his stuff and pee in shoes and suitcase. She could open the kitchen cabinets under the sink, go into a cubby and wind up tunneling all the way down from the second floor to the basement, and unblock any barricade to keep her out, get my grandparents to let her out of the basement, come upstairs and get to his stuff in the stairway vestibule and closet, then go back down and reverse the whole process to not get caught. Or just fly in through the front door when opened.

She was capable of that much planning, and only peeing on his stuff on his weekend visits. She never peed anywhere else during the week, weekends he didn't visit or any other times unless my mom yelled at her or hit her then she'd get my mom's nicest most expensive work clothes. I took her with me to college and she lived with me in my various tiny apartments the rest of her life with my other cat and she loved it. Never peed anywhere inappropriate in eleven years of living just with me and other cat except once peed blood due to a UTI. Stopped with antibiotics.
I realize this is about dogs not cats, but can't convince me dogs aren't just as smart and emotional. Also can't convince me that cat wasn't making a deliberate statement, maybe trying to protect me since she was my cat since she was literally born, or maybe just too stressed.

She was awesome, my aunt's cat had kittens when I was eleven so I picked her out and visited when she was still tiny and nursing and got her at eight weeks. Had her for twenty years, four months, and one week until she died with me petting her when I was 31.
 
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