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My fiancée's mother owns a pure breed Blue Heeler. I noticed the other day that she has a mass under her belly that looks pretty bad. I've tried to get to take her the vet but she complains that she doesnt have the money or the credit to barrow the money to get her checked out. She also says that its not a big deal because Maddie (the dog) does not give any indication that it affects her. I was hoping that someone on here could look at some of the pictures and give me there thoughts on the subject that i could use to convince her to take Maddie it.
 

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she needs to take it to the vet. it could be a cancerous tumor and the only way they can find out is if the dog is taken to the vet.

it's even more urgent if the bump is red, swelling, and growing

has the dog been acting differently ?
 

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Honestly even if it isn't bothering the dog, keep in mind dogs are super tough and it can take a lot for you to see sign of discomfort. Definitely get it checked out, if it's something serious you want to get it taken care of ASAP, not wait around until your dog is lethargic.

It could be a fatty tumor, which isn't a big deal as long as it doesn't grow... But if it were me, I wouldn't want to risk anything.
 

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You can tell your friend that if Maddie is taken to the vet for this now, it may cost money but it may cost even more money in the future if it happens to be something serious and has progressed without any medical attention. I think it's just better to be safe than sorry.
 

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I agree get her to the vets, that doesn't look comfortable. Has she been able to go to bathroom ok?
Its imposible for us to diagnose her through a computer. And as others have said it could be a fatty tumor but there is a chance it could be cancerous. Even if it is just a fatty tumor with the size and location, it doesn't look likes its very fun to walk with and lay on.
 

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Oh also forgot to mention given the location and size, if she's not spayed that's even a bigger reason to go get it checked out.
Keep in mind depending on the tumor, they can be like iceburgs. What you see on the surface is only a small part of it. On the other hand even if it is a fatty tumor, its a large thing that looks like its is or could be rubbing agiants her leg as she walks and could possibly make it hard to pee given its location, she also has to lie down on it.

Is it growing fast? How long has had this? Have your fiancée look into things like care credit. Impo the most important thing right now is to find out what kind of growth it is, and talk to your vet about what the options are and what the best coarse of action is to take.
 
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How likely is your mother to aggressively intervene if it is something serious/malignant? If you don't think your mother would pursue removing it surgically, or if that is not an option financially, then she may not see value in knowing exactly what it is. And honestly I think that's a completely valid choice.

It's not the direction I would personally choose to go, but I don't think it's terrible. Many people philosophically or financially couldn't/wouldn't choose to treat a cancerous mass and just let a dog live its life as long as s/he is happy and pain-free. The dog doesn't know she might have cancer.
 

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If she was not spayed, or was spayed later in life, that could very well be a mammary tumor and it may be cancerous. My other guess would be a fatty tumor. Either way she should be seen by a vet before it gets any worse.

The thing about waiting about knowing something is wrong with a dog, like when she has a lump like Maddie does, and waiting until the dog shows signs of discomfort to bring her to the vet, is that by then the dog is very sick, is suffering, and may not be able to be saved.
 

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The thing about waiting about knowing something is wrong with a dog, like when she has a lump like Maddie does, and waiting until the dog shows signs of discomfort to bring her to the vet, is that by then the dog is very sick, is suffering, and may not be able to be saved.
Well I guess I didn't state it overtly but my point is that some people may opt to make the choice to euthanize at that point. And again, I don't think it's a terrible choice to not intervene.

And if someone makes the choice not to intervene, but to euthanize if the lump affects quality of life then they may not find value in having the lump looked at in the first place, kwim?
 

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Well I guess I didn't state it overtly but my point is that some people may opt to make the choice to euthanize at that point. And again, I don't think it's a terrible choice to not intervene.

And if someone makes the choice not to intervene, but to euthanize if the lump affects quality of life then they may not find value in having the lump looked at in the first place, kwim?

I'm sorry that it seemed that I directed that at you, that wasn't my intention and I hadn't read what you wrote until after I posted. I was referring to the OP saying that the mother was claiming that the dog was not being affected by it
She also says that its not a big deal because Maddie (the dog) does not give any indication that it affects her.
It just breaks my heart when people say that because I've seen dogs put up with what must have been pretty severe pain all the while seeming to be not affected by it. My own terrier mix did so with arthritis, I knew he had it but had no idea how bad it was until he was really suffering and I had an x-ray taken to determine what was going on. It turns out it was severe. I've also seen other dogs and cats suffer and have to be euthanized, when if the owner had taken them in sooner they would have been spared weeks of suffering and maybe have been able to be saved, or at least be put to sleep before it got so bad.

I don't have a problem with not intervening but I just wish they'd find out what they are dealing with and know what to look out for so that they know when it's best to put the dog to sleep. Like will she have trouble breathing, lack of appetite, mobility issues, vomiting...
 

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that is typical of a mammary tumor. Likely due to not being spayed, or being spayed later in life. Been there a while to get that size. Should definitely be removed, though recommend chest rads first +/- an abdominal ultrasound (just be sure it has not metastasized elsewhere). About half the mammary tumors are benign... but half malignant. Spaying her now is just optional... used to think that prevented further tumors, but it doesn't after all. Though spaying will prevent a future life-threatening uterine infection.
 

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that looks very nasty like some kind of tumor please get her to a vet ASAP! must weight quite alot to carry around on her body poor dog
 
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