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I have a male pitbull - husky mix breed dog that is about 16 months of age. He has not yet been fixed as I had been given the advice to wait until he had grown to size before altering his hormones in any way. From the time I got him (when he was about 3 months old) till about 2 months ago he was extremely friendly with both people and other dogs. I never heard him growl or act aggressive in any way towards another person or dog. At the current time he is still very friendly with other dogs. However a few months back I heard him growl at someone for the first time. It has happened more times recently but it usually happens if he is sitting somewhere or on a leash with me and a stranger comes up to him to pet or greet him. He usually doesn't act aggressive if he is allowed to make the first contact with a stranger on his terms by walking up to them. Also, he never acts aggressive towards any person who interacts with him on a weekly or more frequent basis (family members , friends, etc) My question is will getting him neutered cease this aggression toward strangers? I would like to have people (even strangers) be able to interact with him without him getting aggressive in any way towards anyone.
 

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Neutering is actually more likely to make this behaviour worse, not better. The growl is him communicating that he is uncomfortable, and taking away his brave testosterone is likely to make him even more uncomfortable, so I'd suggest you leave the neutering for now.

The growl is an important communication from your dog and should be respected.

Dogs give a series of signals that they are unhappy, but unfortunately most people don't recognise them because they can be quite subtle. To begin with there is often wide eyes, lip licking and yawning. There is also muscular tension in the body. Then the ones we sometimes do see - growl, snarl, nip then bite. If the early signals are not seen (or, in the dog's view, ignored) he won't bother with them because us stupid humans pay no attention anyway; so he may go straight to the bite. So it's important never to ignore the early signals or reprimand the dog for giving them; stopping the dog from giving them would be like taking the battery out of a smoke alarm.

So, please ask strangers not to approach him - if they wanted to come and touch your child you would report them to the authorities; your dog is not public property and there is no reason they should touch him without his, and your agreement. You may need to be firm. But once your dog sees that you are his advocate and you are helping him by keeping him safe from.people that he doesn't want close, his confidence will grow and his bond with you will develop.
 
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