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Looks great. Few suggestions.

First would be start her back a little bit father from the first jump. You may have to work a little bit on the lead outs but it is physically harder for her to jump something from a stand still vs getting a stride or 2 before the jump. Especially when you move the jumps up to her height class. She is going to need some room to actually get her body into gear and get over it. With being that close you risk her dropping bars.

2nd is you and your moving. You see when I first learned agility I thought I was just going to point her at some obstacles and the dog would do all the hard work. I learned that that is NOT the truth at all. Even your littlest of movements sends the dog messages. My biggest problem, and it looks like it might be something you might have to work on, is leaning forward. Leaning forward sends the dog forward, so like when you were heading for the first set of weaves you were leaning forward and moving forward, so she might not have gotten the message that she needed to collect to get in the weaves.

Just a few things I noticed. You guys looked great though. How long have you been doing it? Also @agilityk9trainer and @Laurelin might also have a few suggestions! There are a few GREAT people on this forum who do agility.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks great. Few suggestions.

First would be start her back a little bit father from the first jump. You may have to work a little bit on the lead outs but it is physically harder for her to jump something from a stand still vs getting a stride or 2 before the jump. Especially when you move the jumps up to her height class. She is going to need some room to actually get her body into gear and get over it. With being that close you risk her dropping bars.

2nd is you and your moving. You see when I first learned agility I thought I was just going to point her at some obstacles and the dog would do all the hard work. I learned that that is NOT the truth at all. Even your littlest of movements sends the dog messages. My biggest problem, and it looks like it might be something you might have to work on, is leaning forward. Leaning forward sends the dog forward, so like when you were heading for the first set of weaves you were leaning forward and moving forward, so she might not have gotten the message that she needed to collect to get in the weaves.

Just a few things I noticed. You guys looked great though. How long have you been doing it? Also @agilityk9trainer and @Laurelin might also have a few suggestions! There are a few GREAT people on this forum who do agility.

First suggestion: I started sometimes to do it, but when she is a little far away she goes to other side half of the times, we still have to work on that.

Second, suggestion: I will try to improve that :D

We are doing it for about 5 months, once a week, I started with each obstacle individually and now started to do some mini courses.
But unfortunnely this month we are not doing it because of the heat. After one or two obstacles she runs to the some place in shadow or inside the tunnel and stays there
 

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If she is going around the jump if you are putting her too far back, then you are working too far. You really wanna get a solid lead out. (Another thing I struggled with). If she is going around the jump if you add 2 jumps, then go back to just one just and work on putting her a distance away, leading out, releasing her, and calling her to your hand for a reward.

5 months only! She's looking great! With time you guys have some potential! Are you hoping to compete someday? We are also taking the summer off (stupid heat) and I (and my dog) are going insane!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If she is going around the jump if you are putting her too far back, then you are working too far. You really wanna get a solid lead out. (Another thing I struggled with). If she is going around the jump if you add 2 jumps, then go back to just one just and work on putting her a distance away, leading out, releasing her, and calling her to your hand for a reward.

5 months only! She's looking great! With time you guys have some potential! Are you hoping to compete someday? We are also taking the summer off (stupid heat) and I (and my dog) are going insane!
Thanks I will try that in next day...I hope that in the weekend gets a little more fresh so we can practice.
I still haven't decided if I will compete with her...let's see how she goes, if she gets good I think we could give it a try :)
 

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I am so glad you all are having fun!! Keep up the joy!!

IF you are thinking of competing, consider these few tips. If you don't ever want to compete - ignore them. :D

First - you are luring your dog around the course with a tennis ball. Agility is about speed - not slow. You want your dog running FASTER by far than you do. By keeping your dog by your side with the tennis ball lure, you are teaching your dog to run at your speed. I never tie my dog to my side with a treat or toy. I use the treats or toys to move my dog ahead of me or out to the side of me to run at his speed - not mine. By using the toy to lure him over the obstacles, you are also tying yourself to the performance of those obstacles. You want your dog doing the obstacle with you 10 - 30 feet away. I will post a video of mine to show you how my dog works away from me at his speed - not mine. Remember - agility is about SPEED. Accuracy is taught after speed is taught. :D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyTb0ACzzw8

Second - jclark is right. Don't bend over. :) Stand up straight. Using the lure is causing you to bend over. Bending over pushes our dogs out and causes issues. Stand up and use your dog's natural instinct to follow your body language. Bending over is counter productive to their natural response to our body language.

Your trainer may know your aspirations better than us, and thus may be letting you "get away" with things he wouldn't allow a future competitor to do because he knows you don't want to compete. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am so glad you all are having fun!! Keep up the joy!!

IF you are thinking of competing, consider these few tips. If you don't ever want to compete - ignore them. :D

First - you are luring your dog around the course with a tennis ball. Agility is about speed - not slow. You want your dog running FASTER by far than you do. By keeping your dog by your side with the tennis ball lure, you are teaching your dog to run at your speed. I never tie my dog to my side with a treat or toy. I use the treats or toys to move my dog ahead of me or out to the side of me to run at his speed - not mine. By using the toy to lure him over the obstacles, you are also tying yourself to the performance of those obstacles. You want your dog doing the obstacle with you 10 - 30 feet away. I will post a video of mine to show you how my dog works away from me at his speed - not mine. Remember - agility is about SPEED. Accuracy is taught after speed is taught. :D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyTb0ACzzw8

Second - jclark is right. Don't bend over. :) Stand up straight. Using the lure is causing you to bend over. Bending over pushes our dogs out and causes issues. Stand up and use your dog's natural instinct to follow your body language. Bending over is counter productive to their natural response to our body language.

Your trainer may know your aspirations better than us, and thus may be letting you "get away" with things he wouldn't allow a future competitor to do because he knows you don't want to compete. :)
Really impressive, if I get that far from her at this point she gets distracted :ponder: but I will try to get one step far from her each time. So should I hide the ball and only show it to her at the end?

The problem of my class is that most of the other dogs owners just want basic obedience and the classes must cover everyone needs unfortunately!

By the way do you train at home? Or just at schools? I was looking for something that I could transport and mount in the garden near home to pratice more time but I couldn't find nothing like that in stores :(
 

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Most people who use toys usually hid them. Some people use a ball clip like this one (
) and some people just shove it in their pocket or something. If I use a tug I usually have it shoved down the back of my pants. But I try to avoid using toys with my dog.

Please not that the distance the @agilityk9trainer gets is not for beginners. It is not easy to have that type of distance, and some handlers never do. She is the distance queen. I hope to one day have just a little bit of that distance.

It sounds like your class isn't a dedicated agility class. Have you thought about looking into just an agility class? One that focuses just on agility. Your dog seems to enjoy it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Most people who use toys usually hid them. Some people use a ball clip like this one (Amazon.com : Gamma Color Love Cup Ball Holder, Clear : Tennis Equipment : Sports & Outdoors) and some people just shove it in their pocket or something. If I use a tug I usually have it shoved down the back of my pants. But I try to avoid using toys with my dog.

Please not that the distance the @agilityk9trainer gets is not for beginners. It is not easy to have that type of distance, and some handlers never do. She is the distance queen. I hope to one day have just a little bit of that distance.

It sounds like your class isn't a dedicated agility class. Have you thought about looking into just an agility class? One that focuses just on agility. Your dog seems to enjoy it!

In August the school closes for holidays, but when it reopens in Setember I will check if there is any chance of making an agility class only. Either way, I will check other schools also.

Yeah I think that just a bit of that dfistance for me was enough :D
 

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First, yes the distance I get is rather large and takes years to train and maintain. You need to get some distance, but not that much. And yes, you accomplish it by moving away one step at a time.

I would hide your toy, but not out where it is visible. I would put it in your pocket or the back of your pants. I am firmly against treat bags or toy holders that are visible to the dog as it says lout and proud, "I HAVE TREATS AND TOYS." Then when you go into the ring, the dog knows you don't have a treat or toy because the bag or holder is gone. I want my dogs to always wonder if I am loaded or not. :D

As for equipment, in the US, you can often purchase equipment at agility trials or on-line. It is not found in stores. Or, you can make your own. I own my own school, so I have all of the equipment. I purchased the contact obstacles and made my own jumps. If you visit a local agility trial (which I recommend anyway), you may find vendors there that sell some equipment.

If you live in the UK, there are trials all over the place every weekend. Look on line and start reading about agility venues and clubs in your area. Visiting a local show may open you up to great trainers in your area you didn't know existed. I don't advertise at all in my area, and I get students by word of mouth.

Good luck!! And have fun!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
First, yes the distance I get is rather large and takes years to train and maintain. You need to get some distance, but not that much. And yes, you accomplish it by moving away one step at a time.

I would hide your toy, but not out where it is visible. I would put it in your pocket or the back of your pants. I am firmly against treat bags or toy holders that are visible to the dog as it says lout and proud, "I HAVE TREATS AND TOYS." Then when you go into the ring, the dog knows you don't have a treat or toy because the bag or holder is gone. I want my dogs to always wonder if I am loaded or not. :D

As for equipment, in the US, you can often purchase equipment at agility trials or on-line. It is not found in stores. Or, you can make your own. I own my own school, so I have all of the equipment. I purchased the contact obstacles and made my own jumps. If you visit a local agility trial (which I recommend anyway), you may find vendors there that sell some equipment.

If you live in the UK, there are trials all over the place every weekend. Look on line and start reading about agility venues and clubs in your area. Visiting a local show may open you up to great trainers in your area you didn't know existed. I don't advertise at all in my area, and I get students by word of mouth.

Good luck!! And have fun!!
I went to one trial in here in May but the sport it's in an early stage and it's only the competition area. I wiil try to find something online again or I will have to build by my own :)
 
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