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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 8 month old labradoodle mutt (mother was a labradoodle father lab mix)
She is lunging & biting me very hard. She won’t follow any commands when she is in this mode (which she knows) and treats don’t work. She has ripped most of my tops and jeans. She weighs 50 pounds and she almost knocked me over today. I’m 68 and can’t have a dog that will lung & bite. HELP!!
 

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Hello and sorry you are going through this. Think of your puppy as a rebellious teenager, and many of us have gone through the same thing until they grow up, and REMEMBER what rules they learned early on.

1st you must rule out any possible medical issues..

I am in my mid 70s and went through that with a 65 lb Golden Retriever that was like a bull in a China Shop. Thankfully, she grew out of that stage at about 18 months old and continues to mellow at 3.5 yrs old.

I also have 2 others and when they all go on a "tear", I stand still and get close to a wall indoors, until they are done and move away.

Yep, as we get older, it is much harder getting up then falling down.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello and sorry you are going through this. Think of your puppy as a rebellious teenager, and many of us have gone through the same thing until they grow up, and REMEMBER what rules they learned early on.

1st you must rule out any possible medical issues..

I am in my mid 70s and went through that with a 65 lb Golden retriever that was like a bull in a China Shop. Thankfully, she grew out of that stage at about 18 months old and continues to mellow at 3.5 yrs old.

I also have 2 others and when they all go on a "tear", I stand still and get close to a wall indoors, until they are done and move away.

Yep, as we get older, it is much harder getting up then falling down.;)
No medical issues, she was just at the vets. I probably have handled it wrong, but the only way to stop getting bit is to make her sit by holding 2 hands on her collar until she stops.
 

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No medical issues, she was just at the vets. I probably have handled it wrong, but the only way to stop getting bit is to make her sit by holding 2 hands on her collar until she stops.
IMO, (not knowing the dog), I still think it is the teenage years. Is she nipping playfully, or actually biting?
Goldens have a soft mouth, but are also very mouthy. It took quite some time to learn that nipping hurt and meant the end of playtime. When she comes at you, try and make yourself small, standing sideways and tucking in your arms and hands. That should give her less "real estate" to grab on to,

Now, even though she plays really rough with the other two, she goes out of her way to be gentle with me.
 

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No medical issues, she was just at the vets. I probably have handled it wrong, but the only way to stop getting bit is to make her sit by holding 2 hands on her collar until she stops.
Does she seem playful at the time, or fearful?

If it's playful, @Buzzu2's suggestion of ending playtime is a good one to teach her to mind her manners. Dogs will also yelp unusually loudly at a puppy's overenthusiastic biting when teaching them appropriate behaviour.

If it's fearful, holding her collar is likely to reinforce the behaviour by making her feel trapped.
 

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Since it sounds like it is first thing in the morning, it might be more like a mixture of over excitement and lack of impulse control.

For general impulse control

For impulse control plus high-energy play. Just be careful to avoid sharp turns or high jumps for joint health at this age.


And maybe not, but you might find this helpful
 

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@emeraldecho asked if she is playful or fearful - it would help to know the answer.

From what you have said so far, it sounds more like over excitement and play, this is how she would have played with her littermates but learning bite inhibition is important - she should learn to play differently ASAP.

If she is trying to play, you could carry a toy like a tuggy rope to redirect her. That tells her play is fine, but only in an appropriate way. If she ignores the toy and still wants to use you as her toy, wrap her leash round a tree or post and step out of reach. You want to give a very clear signal that teeth on skin equals end of fun. Be really consistent. Toy, and if that doesn't work, tree. If you do this every time, she will get the message.

I think she will go out by herself from now on.
That won't actually solve the problem though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Since it sounds like it is first thing in the morning, it might be more like a mixture of over excitement and lack of impulse control.

For general impulse control

For impulse control plus high-energy play. Just be careful to avoid sharp turns or high jumps for joint health at this age.


And maybe not, but you might find this helpful
 

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Forgive me if I missed it, but how much physical and mental exercise is she getting on a regular basis?
By mental exercise I mean, walks where she gets to sniff and explore the world at her own pace, doing things like learning new skills, perhaps to 'settle' on cue, touch, 'find it' (inside and outside the house) or tricks like shake a paw, weave, learning to go over, under or around obstacles, interactive toys like Kongs stuffed with part of her meals, Kong wobbler, snuffle mats, shaping games such as 101 Things to Do with a Box | Karen Pryor Clicker Training, pretty much anything that engages her mind rather requiring lots of movement.

My border collie when he was young pup, was the Energizer Bunny X10, so I worked to help him focus on activities such as the ones that I suggested that helped to slow him down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I walk her in the morning 7:30 am for 40 minutes come home play ball for 1/2 hour, repeat at noon and again at 6. My vet said 5 minutes per month for walks. I do about 5 minutes of training a day, which she excels at in the yard but completely ignores outside of the yard. She has a Kong and lots of other toys. She is a constant barker (even barks at her shadow in the window) digger and is very mouthy. I have had dogs my whole life, always 2 at a time, this is my first solo puppy and I’m beginning to think I made a mistake. It makes me very sad. I think she needs a younger owner, she is wearing me down.
 

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Impulse control training and games are good for any time of day. My guess was that since morning was pretty regular for her to do this, it implied to me that the mouthing and jumping is a lack of impulse control and energy rather than something like aggression or fear.

Could you try to work in more and longer training sessions? Or even incorporating them into those games of fetch (if you aren't already, and things like sit or down before throwing).
 
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