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Nothing seems to tire out my 4 month puppy like a 20 minute walk since it's mentally and physically stimulating. The problem is the first few times he walked by my side, but now he's pulling ahead excitedly. So I've started loose leash training. Problem is I can walk about half a block before he gets overstimulated and starts pulling and pulling no matter how many times I stop or turn around. I think i have to stop and say "uh uh" about 70 times a half block walk. So how do i get him this kind of exercise without undoing the loose leash work by letting him pull. Fetch doesn't seem to tire him out and I don't have a fenced in back yard.
 

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I have good experience walking backwards :) I keep the puppy in front of me and walk backwards, holding treats in my hand offering it and giving it while walking, when the puppy is going nicely by my side.
Like you, I also stop if the puppy pulls when I'm going forwards, but I'm not saying anything - this way the puppy has to use the head and that's good, both because it will make the puppy tired and because the puppy will have to figure the solution for how to get forwards out for itself, which makes it easier for it to understand.
I hope it make sense - if not, I will have to tell you in Danish... :)

Good luck!
 

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Frankly I just drive to a park, let them blow off steam then go for a short "training" walk when they are able to get ahold of themselves a little better. Alternately I will walk dogs down to a park on a halti or front-clip, let them run around, and then do LLW on their "real" collar or harness as we walk home.

Either way, my success has always been in exercising the dog before the actual walk.
 

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1) Work on loose leash walking in a low distraction environment (inside, or preferably, in a backyard).
2) Once outside, dead-stop when he pulls. Don't move until he sits or comes back to you.
3) Reward/praise when he's walking at your side.
4) Teach "look" command (again, in less distracting environment), and use during walk to encourage engagement with you (reward).
5) Shorten the leash when he's not responding, relax/loosen as soon as he's complying.
6) It's OK, if he's ahead, so long as the leash is loose.
7) Allow occasional stops for sniffing.
8) Try burning off some energy through a vigorous game (tug, fetch) before you head out.

Practice, practice, practice, and stay consistent. It takes time, and the puppy will always get excited when out and about.

ETA: special harnesses are a tool, but in my experience, not guaranteed. It's about teaching good manners and developing engagement (attention on you).
 

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I have good experience walking backwards :) I keep the puppy in front of me and walk backwards, holding treats in my hand offering it and giving it while walking, when the puppy is going nicely by my side.
Like you, I also stop if the puppy pulls when I'm going forwards, but I'm not saying anything - this way the puppy has to use the head and that's good, both because it will make the puppy tired and because the puppy will have to figure the solution for how to get forwards out for itself, which makes it easier for it to understand.
I hope it make sense - if not, I will have to tell you in Danish... :)

Good luck!
I rather like this especially the "I also stop if the puppy pulls when I'm going forwards, but I'm not saying anything " In a sense it somewhat lines up with an environmental consequence in a dog's mind and not a handler induced consequence. Saying nothing at times but yet an event (consequence)occurs due to a dog's action can be a wonderful training tool.
 

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Part of this comes from just being a puppy. He is active and inexperienced in the world so he wants to explore. I agree that exercise first then training just to wear him down some.

I start in the home with "watch me". Use this with a small treat. It's a good idea to find treats of various value to the dog. Just practice watch me as you move about. I use a leash and collar. Keep the sessions short. I like to use a retrieve toy session before indoor training. Give maybe 10 watch me events. As soon as he responds give reward and praise. You can even do this while preparing his food.

Any time the dog is paying attention to what you are doing, you can say watch me and as the dog looks to you give reward. I have a nail pouch that I used to wear around my appartment all day just to do this.

I use a tab on my leach too. You have a pup so this is harder. I just don't let the dog go to the end of the leash. He goes only as far as I let him. He is closer so watch me is closer than distractions.

It's going to take awhile with an excitable pup so give it time but be consistent

The point here is to get the dog to focus on you especially when you ask.

I also talk to my dog all the time. I use a talk to a child voice/tone just for her. I probably sound like a jabbering fool when out walking. Every time she looks at me is reward time. Eventually the dog will start checking to see what you are doing or if you are coming along.

I let the dog pull as hard as she wants for quite a ways then it's work time and I either just gather up the leash and say heel or of late just say "let's go for a walk". This demands heel position until I release her.. Lots of watch me until it becomes habit.

It's been two years now and my Aussie is like industrial Velcro. She hardly ever takes here eyes off me. When we walk she just brushes my leg almost like the harness was attached there. When I release her she just touches the end of the leash then looks back. Other time she just walks easily beside me.

All this is done with no yanking or force training. Just reward what is desired and redirect errors.
 

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What tools are you using for these "loose leash" walks? I am going to put together a video for you to review as a resource. I will put it together over the next day or so.

When you begin a walk, you need to set the 'tone' of the walk. If the puppy leads, then he or she leads, but if you wait until your needs are met-then you set the pace for the walk
 
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