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Not to get too OT, but probably 90% of pet shop puppies are from puppy mills. The rest are from very poor backyard breeders. NO good breeder with any compassion would sell to a pet store based on the fact that they wouldn't get any say in where their puppies end up. Even a low-quality breeder that at least cares about their dogs would prefer to at least know who they are selling to.

So unless the pet store runs a rescue in it, it's a terrible industry to support. But, more and more there are laws coming around that say pet stores cannot sell puppies/kittens unless they are just displaying for rescue. The downside to that is that the thugs just move online, and they can be trickier that way too.

Also, not every puppy mill is composed of rundown sheds that get busted. Any breeder that is inspected or licensed is likely a puppy mill (commercial breeder) as you aren't subject to that unless you have a high volume of dogs. They may provide food and water and adequate shelter, but they also don't provide any kindness or love and their dogs aren't health or temperament checked, so it's a MAJOR gamble. I'd say more so since moving online, they can lock buyers in on looks alone - they don't even have to physically meet the puppy.


In response to your second question - a good breeder will know their puppies apart, and will know exactly which one is meant for you. You will tell them your preferences in gender and color and what you are looking for in a dog, and most of the time they will either choose the puppy for you based on the individual puppy's temperament, or they will narrow it down. It may seem a little restricting, but again, a GOOD breeder really knows their dogs and will be able to make that perfect match.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
PK. That was actually what I was thinking when talking about "puppy mills". That there are those we see on the news that get raided. That are rundown shacks. 20 puppies crammed into some enclosure only fit for 3 dogs. Feces everywhere. Then there are the cleaner "mills" where most pet shops buy from. Usually.

Our pet shop dogs probably came from such facilities. I don't think any big franchise pet shops would risk buying unhealthy pups from some rundown shack backwoods mill. Customers would just keep bringing the dogs back demanding refunds.

Any how...as I said...I'm going to buy from a breeder. But won't totally rule out taking a look in a pet shop. Maybe the same chain my parents bought our first 2 dogs from. :) And take a chance. All dogs deserve a good home. Even if they come from a "clean puppy mill" or SPCA shelter.

I mean lots of people purposely buy from shelters knowing that the dogs were likely abandoned or given up due to behavioural problems. Or maybe financial reasons.

Regarding your replay to my question of how breeders know which pup was the one chosen...perhaps as you say "they just know". :) Like parents can usually tell the difference between identical twins. :) I was looking at photos of litters and to me...they all look the same most of the time. Some breeds and litters.

Did see a Siberian Husky litter photo where the puppies had a different shaped "white area" on their forehead. :)

Also, here in Ontario, how it usually works is...after 8 weeks we see them again (I think 2nd visit)...choose the puppy we want ourselves and provide the breeder with the name we plan to use so the puppy gets familiar with that name...then 2 weeks later the puppy is picked up (of course before all that there's the being put on a waiting list, paying a deposit or two). They usually aren't picked for us. At least according to a few breeder websites that describe their adoption procedure I've come across.

Any how...just heard from a Siberian Husky breeder...mentioned pricing willingly.

As I said...seems some breeders of certain breeds are more open to mentioning pricing up front and answering any type of questions. W/O thinking the buyer might not be serious. Unlike many Pug breeders in Ontario. Interesting dynamic.

Every Siberian Husky breeder has been quick to reply and answer my questions. Same for the Cane Corso breeders. Maltese. And most Shih Tzu breeders.

Will probably post again next year after the few Pug breeders that have replied have litters and I've chosen which breeder to go with and have been "approved" by them.

Thanks for your replies every one.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
One more thing PK. Before I leave this thread. I now see what you were saying about how pups might be matched with the buyer in some cases. As I just read an article posted on one of the websites of a Pug breeder I was considering. And explains why some breeders might not be replying to my emails. I'm guessing they follow this same thinking. Here's the article...

Available

Can't say I agree with some points. That the breeder should match the dog with the buyer for the reasons mentioned. I believe the buyer will know immediately which dog is the right one. And that we won't mistake the outgoing pup that is the only one that greets every potential buyer as "the one". Though, I'm sure it happens. I'm sure the breeder would also tell the buyer that "this dog is the most outgoing one...and is the first to meet new people...".

Maybe there's 3 puppies in the litter that matches our criteria for "the look" we're wanting...1 is outgoing, first to greet the buyer, but then runs away. Then there's the 2nd that walks near the buyer and just lays next to and looks at the buyer. Then there's the third...doesn't pay attention at all to the new person in the room. No eye contact.

I'd probably choose puppy #2 as there is a connection. There has to be that indescribable something. Must be a true chemistry. Not jut a puppy that just wants to investigate or just wants to play for a minute then run away.

The buyer should choose. The breeder can't know the buyer over a 1 hour phone + application + 1 hour face-to-face meeting. I'm sure some buyers wanting a puppy bad enough will put on an act and sell herself/himself well. Great at interviews. Terrific salesmen/promoter types. It takes a long time to truly know some one. Months. Maybe years.

Any how...will be back next year with an update. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #24
wanted to edit the last post. Couldn't as I had edited one too many times. Wanted to add...

My 1st pet shop dog...Father went to buy the dog on his own. Wanted to surprise us. He did no research. Likely "saw dog, looked cute, BUY". Just brought it home one night. Dog was totally fine. Perfect health for 95% of her life. Got along great.

2nd pet shop dog...mother chose...didn't pick from a litter obviously. Was cute. Like the way it looked and how it reacted to my mother when put on her lap. And how it reacted seeing me. My father. There was that indescribable "something". A connection. You just KNOW.
 

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I actually think that link explained pretty well why breeders prefer to do the matching in many cases. It's less a fact that they don't know you as well, and more that they are basing their decision off of what you told them about your lifestyle and what you are looking for in a dog.

People get blinded by super cute puppies and may not make the best choice. It's happened to me in the past; it happens to a lot of people. Breeders spend a lot of time with their dogs, so they can easily pick out these traits that others may attribute to other causes. Puppy #1 may be super adorable and in-demand, but may also be shy and need someone who is experienced with socialization and has a quiet household. Puppy #2 may be a bundle of fun, but may require an owner who can provide extra exercise and training. And maybe Puppy#2 is tired when you arrive and only comes and lies next to you calmly - but the breeder knows the reality.

As for telling them apart - sometimes if they truly look alike, breeders will tie ribbons around them to be sure. But a lot of the time, after personalities and features emerge, you really can just tell. I grew up on a farm; we had black Angus cattle that all looked alike to the untrained eye, but after you spend hours a day with them, you can absolutely tell which one is which with a quick look.

Anyway, good luck on your search for a puppy!
 
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