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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In order of importance:

  • Small - Pref under 20 lbs.
  • Little grooming,
  • low shedding,
  • min. exercise needed,
  • low separation anxiety,
  • easy to train.
  • Doesnt bark a lot.
  • Hypoallergenic and watchdog are also nice to haves.
  • Can tolerate heat/cold.
  • Minimal health issues.


Not about all these criteria, but a few like mi-ki seem to fit most important criteria. Bolonoodle and Cavachon arent bad, but larger and need more exercise.

Norfolk-terrier seems interesting, but requires lots of exercise, and concerned about it tolerating being alone even though a dog encyclopedia says otherwise.



Any advice?
 

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What about a bichon? They're under 20 pounds, hypoallergenic, don't need much exercise, they don't shed, I don't think they're known for separation anxiety but I think that depends more on the dog than the breed
 

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Honestly, no such dog exists. I don't want to be blunt--but you're basically asking for a dog that has 0 issues and requires very little work to own. If these are your expectations, I would opt for a different type of pet. The only one of these that you can (most likely) "guarantee" in any dog is "under 20 lbs".

Dogs with hair don't shed, but they need to be groomed on the regular. This also doesn't make them "hypoallergenic", unless you happen to be allergic to fur. Dogs with short fur may not need to be groomed a lot, but they shed and do need to be brushed to get the dead fur out.

Most dogs under 20 lbs will be sensitive to the cold.

Dogs that make good watch dogs are dogs that like to bark at things.

All dogs can experience separation anxiety.

No dog is truly "easy to train", it's a matter of whether or not you know how to train. A dog could be the most difficult dog for an inexperienced person, but be a breeze for someone who has experience training dogs.

There are breeds that require little exercise, but these are usually companion breeds that are pretty prone to separation anxiety due to their nature.
 

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There are lots of dogs that meet one, two, or maybe even three of your requirements, but some of your requirements are directly conflicting each other.

Good watch dog and doesn't bark a lot do not go together. Really I think you can either expect a dog to shed a lot or you can expect to pay for grooming. The only dog I can think of that would require no grooming/shedding would be a hairless Chinese Crested, but they do not handle the cold very well, and they really don't like being alone.

Also, just because a dog is under 20 lbs doesn't mean it doesn't need ample exercise. Most of the little dogs I know can just go and go and go.
 

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I would say a Shetland sheep dog.

But all the things you named are possible in any dog you get.

Shelties are fairly easy to train and willing to work, they are good guard dogs and family dogs.

They do require some brushing out with the longer hair, but other then that they are good.

Any dog you get need exercise, some of the smallest dogs can walk a long ways and still be bouncing off the walls when you get home.

I wouldn't look into a whole bunch of designer dogs because you will end up paying a lot more with not a whole lot of health guarantee and not so good bloodlines.

I hope this helped :)
 

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I would say a Shetland sheep dog.

But all the things you named are possible in any dog you get.

Shelties are fairly easy to train and willing to work, they are good guard dogs and family dogs.

They do require some brushing out with the longer hair, but other then that they are good.

Any dog you get need exercise, some of the smallest dogs can walk a long ways and still be bouncing off the walls when you get home.

I wouldn't look into a whole bunch of designer dogs because you will end up paying a lot more with not a whole lot of health guarantee and not so good bloodlines.

I hope this helped :)
Shelties require a lot of grooming, are high energy, are usually over 20 lbs, very vocal, and can be difficult to get out of their mouthy phase.
 

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A push toy would fulfil most of your criteria :D

Seriously now, you don't say what you want the dog for and what you are prepared to do for the dog in return - in terms of exercise (all dogs should have walks no matter how small),mental stimulation - in terms of play, training, how long the dog is likely to be left alone - if long, what can you arrange in terms of dog sitter, doggy day care or similar.

Health issues - I'm sure we all hope none of our dogs ever develop them, but life isn't always that kind. Can you afford pet insurance, vet fees if your dog does develop health issues? Training? Can you spare the time and money to find a good training class? Can you put up with a new puppy's soiling/crying/sleepless nights/neighbours complaints/nipping/destroying of things whilst he settling in, learning what is acceptable and what is not?

So, in reality, without more information, it's impossible to guide you to your 'ideal' pal.
 

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There are lots of dogs that meet one, two, or maybe even three of your requirements, but some of your requirements are directly conflicting each other.

Good watch dog and doesn't bark a lot do not go together. Really I think you can either expect a dog to shed a lot or you can expect to pay for grooming. The only dog I can think of that would require no grooming/shedding would be a hairless Chinese Crested, but they do not handle the cold very well, and they really don't like being alone.

Also, just because a dog is under 20 lbs doesn't mean it doesn't need ample exercise. Most of the little dogs I know can just go and go and go.
My understanding of Chinese crested is that although there is no brushing etc as there's hardly anything to brush, doesn't mean low maintenance - they need frequent bathing, moisturising, sun screen etc. Also their teeth need care as, I believe, they are genetically predisposed to bad teeth. So, in my mind their grooming requirements are higher than average.
 

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@icemaiden - True, I guess I wasn't including bathing in grooming, but I should have.
 

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Agree with what others have said, no dog is going to meet your criteria in every category. As an observation from my experience, dogs that are easiest to train are usually higher energy dogs, dogs that demand lots of human contact--that is what drives them to work to please you. A low energy, independent dog isn't going to have much drive to work hard during training without some serious effort and dog savvy wisdom and effort on the part of their human.
 

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It's been said, but no such dog exists. Generally if you want a non-shedder they have high grooming needs. So would you rather have hair around the house or brush the dog regularly and pay $40-60 every 6 weeks for grooming?

Typically small dogs have very little tolerance for the cold. So you're out there.

"Doesn't bark a lot" and "watchdog" are also somewhat oxymoronic because how else do you expect the dog to warn you about something. The neighbor coming home and slamming their car door would likely create the same alert barks as a possible burglar coming to the house.

There aren't many breeds that are pre-disposed to separation anxiety as far as I know, but it's more an individual issue, like a mental illness that they're born with or develops due to life experiences.

There are many low energy breeds but all dogs need a good walk or romp a day, even when small. I swear our little 10 lb Yorkie/Maltese mix has just as much energy as my Cattle Dog mix.

Almost every purebred has health issues. "Designer" dogs have just as many if not more, and I saw you reference them. Cavaliers are probably the most genetically destroyed breeds there are, and ANYTHING mixed with that is going to have health issues, and while it's a biased opinion the only "Cavachon" I met had serious fear issues. Breeding a Bolognese to a Poodle (which I assume that is) is just kind of silly, because they have the same root breed of the poodle family. Also, basically all "Designer" breeds are bred in puppy mills are are emotionally and physically destroyed. I have one and he's already racked up $4000 in vet bills since we got him in June.

I have to say I don't know much about Mi-Kis but they're rare so you're going to pay a lot. Bichons are great as Hannah mentioned, and Cotons are but they are much rarer. A lot of people come to this site asking about breeds and breed mixes bringing up extraordinarily rare breeds and almost unheard of breed mixes after finding them on the internet. If that's what you did and you don't have $1200-5000 to spend on a dog, some of the choices might need to be changed! So I think if you want a dog you need to slim down your list of requirements to make it more realistic, and also look at your life and decide if you really do want a dog. If you want something small, quiet animal that you don't have to exercise much that's tolerant of heat and cold and won't get upset when you leave, a cat might be the better pet for you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks

Bichon Frise has high grooming requirements, according to couple sources I read.

If these are your expectations, I would opt for a different type of pet.
No, but I believe in planning for absolute optimal results, instead of using the "how much is that doggy in the window"

Dogs with hair don't shed
Good to know.

This also doesn't make them "hypoallergenic"
True. According to ACK "While no dog is 100% hypoallergenic, there are a variety of breeds that do well with allergy sufferers. "


According to Dogtime, whose data is apparently flawed (but trying to get some books instead):


Small dogs that dont do well alone (obviously training, and specific personalities matter too):

  • pomeranian
  • yorkshire-terrier
  • havanese
  • maltese
  • Affenpinscher
  • coton-de-tulear
  • Bichon frise


Maybe somewhat better being alone:

  • Lhasa Apso
  • Brussels Griffon
  • peekapoo
  • norfolk-terrier (I think this is wrong actually)


There are breeds that require little exercise, but these are usually companion breeds that are pretty prone to separation anxiety due to their nature.
Good to know too
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Agree with what others have said, no dog is going to meet your criteria in every category.
I am not looking for that. I am looking for a "whats a better choice from available breeds" E.g. Yorkshire Terrier is a nightmare to groom, but Westie is much better.

Barking: While some barking is acceptable, constant barking is not. Yes, I understand training/dominance has a lot to do with this.
 

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lol so you want a robot dog

I'm sorry but dogs will not meet a checklist. I'd narrow it down to 2-3 traits you particularly enjoy and go from there. Dogs are sentient creatures with an array of personalities. They won't be your perfect dream pet, believe me. No matter how hard you try, your dog won't be perfect. Cosmo has a ton of flaws but I love him to pieces.

I wouldn't breed shop if you're looking for a criteria. I'd just hang out with some older rescue or shelter dogs, and avoid puppies like the plague. Puppies are a wild card. Adult dogs have constructed personalities. Many rescues and shelters will let you hang out with the dog on walks, in designated rooms, and play in fenced in areas. Some even let you take the dog home for a couple days to see how they get along with your family with the offer to take them back if it doesn't work out.

No dog is hypo allergenic. They may not shed but all dogs have dander and allergens.
 

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Dominance has absolutely nothing to do with barking. I'd definitely find other means of training if you're planning on using dominance based training because most of it is crap imo.

Also no dog should be subjected to "being alone" for long periods of time. How long does your dog need to be alone?
 

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I think the only breeds that you listed on the shorter list that might fit are a Brussels Griffon. Peke-a-Poos aren't a real breed, they're a hybrid and therefore unpredictable, although judging by the coat requirements of both breeds they will require lots of grooming, as will Lhasas. A Norfolk might be ok but terrier tend to have high energy, and be very stubborn and sometimes barky.

Instead of saying what random traits you want in a dog, why do you want a dog? What do you expect from him/her? What do you want to do with him/her? What kind of time will you have to spend with the dog and train it and all that?

And...have you considered just going to a shelter and seeing what dogs match up with you? That might be better and easier.
 
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Hi doggiedoggiedoggie (cute name!),

I think it's great that you're asking questions and doing some research before bringing home new dog. This is always a plus.

I think that one of the reasons you're getting the reactions you are is because of the word "ideal" in your subject header. To me, it conjured up ideas of looking at photos of mail order brides: I want my bride to be tall (between 5'8 and 5'10), thin (no more than 135 pounds), gorgeous (blonde?), athletic (tennis would be awesome!), well-travelled, fluent in French, etc...... One might just be able to come up with a woman who fits most of the wish list, but her personality could make her an entirely inappropriate partner.

Icemaiden had some great questions, which I hope you can answer:

A push toy would fulfil most of your criteria :D

Seriously now, you don't say what you want the dog for and what you are prepared to do for the dog in return - in terms of exercise (all dogs should have walks no matter how small),mental stimulation - in terms of play, training, how long the dog is likely to be left alone - if long, what can you arrange in terms of dog sitter, doggy day care or similar.

Health issues - I'm sure we all hope none of our dogs ever develop them, but life isn't always that kind. Can you afford pet insurance, vet fees if your dog does develop health issues? Training? Can you spare the time and money to find a good training class? Can you put up with a new puppy's soiling/crying/sleepless nights/neighbours complaints/nipping/destroying of things whilst he settling in, learning what is acceptable and what is not?

So, in reality, without more information, it's impossible to guide you to your 'ideal' pal.
In short, what is your lifestyle like? And, how do you envision a dog fitting into your lifestyle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mail order puppies....Sounds good considering dogs are bred for various purposes. Hmmm, breeding people for specific traits, thats a good idea....

Actually, I have owned dogs before. It was fine and fun. I am not ignorant.

"Ideal" okay, let's move on. Focus on the positive. I cant tell you how everyone in my industry is basically a naysayer, and I am the opposite, and I find answers where others tell me its impossible.
 
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