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Discussion Starter #1
Hey! I currently have a 2 year old corgi lab mix and she's lower drive and not an obedience whip (She hears you alright, but you can literally see her debate if she wants to obey or not.) I grew to love her and now I wouldn't part from her, but she was a gift puppy and if I had my choice, I wouldn't have chosen her. So, within some 2-3 years I plan on acquiring a puppy (this is the time to research and learn bloodlines and make sure that this is definitely the breed for me.) Now, I'm hoping you guys can give me some breed suggestions. I've created a "shopping list" of the sorts.
-Dog Tolerance: Clearly with a dog already in the house, a dog that doesn't fare well with dogs, like an Akita, won't work.
-Child Tolerance: Over the course of the next two decades, I do plan on having children.
-Intelligence and Obedience: I understand that "intelligence" in the wrong hands can mean destructive behavior and being unprepared for that intelligence is what lands drivey dogs in the pound. But, I also know that intelligence in the right hands can be a beautiful thing, and, I think I have the right hands.
-A versatile dog: I'm a housewife (in desperate need of a hobby to pass the time, like a drivier dog than my couch potato of a pupper.) I want a dog who will take to the water, (Husband is in the Navy, so, we'll also be close to water.) Be able to go to town and be politely aloof with strangers, as well as come home and settle.
-Attachment: I want a dog who's affectionate. "Under my feet," doesn't bother me, a roommate of a dog does. I need puppy cuddles!
-Size and Weight: Call me weird, but I have a bias against fat, drooly dogs. I like sleek, athletic dogs. I don't mind shedder, if it's for the right dog. I definitely want a medium to large dog, no giants and no tiny dogs.
-Exercise: Did I make it clear I want a jogging partner? Definitely an athletic dog, but one who doesn't need to run in circles in the back yard for 6 hours.

Thank you for reading and thank you in advance for suggestions!
 

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Welcome! Nice that you're doing some research to find a good fit. A field- or sport-bred lab or golden would likely work, field spaniel, brittany, or maybe one of the springer spaniels could work, too.

I know less about them, but maybe a pointer, sheltie, or Icelandic sheepdog (they've suddenly become very popular among dog people I know).

Border collies and Aussies could fit, but they (especially BCs, from my understanding) can be less dog and people tolerant than the sporting breeds. That said, since you're doing research well in advance of getting a puppy, you have time to explore lines and whatnot.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! I was looking in field labs and goldens, I was shocked at how different they look! As far as border collies, I would absolutely love one, they're gorgeous and intelligent, but I'm scared of how drivey they are, and my inability to keep a BC happy and healthy. It's to my understanding that Aussie's are less drivey, less "intense," and more bouncy? My stepmom owned a show line and she didn't have much drive, and she was DEFINITELY her dog, the dog hated my dad and was indifferent to the kids. I get that's not typical behavior of the breed.

Does anyone have any experience with the Standard Poodle or the Viszla? I was looking into those and they seem suited.
 

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Honestly, Viszlas are insane. Crazy high energy (like bouncing off the walls crazy). They are a lot of dog.
Aussies are great. I have a BC too, who is also great. My Aussie definitely requires less work than my BC. Mine is also a "show line", but is also from a line that did work on the breeder's farm, so he's a combination. Great drive for agility, obedience, and play, but also a fantastic snuggler. He is velcro, always under-feet or glued to my leg. He used to be EXTREMELY friendly to everyone, but as he's grown up, he's grown more aloof. Happy to be out and about, but not the goofy, happy over-exuberant lab.
I think an Aussie could be a great fit for you. They don't need hours and hours of exercise, just some exercise and lots of mental training.
 

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I have two standard poodles and they'd be a good fit for you. The right about of drive and "go" but also a good off switch and cuddles for days.
 

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@Shandula, I noticed there are a lot of "mini aussie" breeds, or there are working Aussie breeders. I don't want a dog hardbred for herding. Did you get your Aussie from a versatile/sports breeder? I think I might want to take up a dog sport like competitive agility or flyball. I know Aussies rock agility and so do BC's. How long can your Aussie settle in the house with light work before getting antsy (after maturing of course)? My definition of a solid "off" switch would be a mature dog that can settle in the house for 2-3 days before getting antsy. I wouldn't expect that of a puppy, of course. Also, how well does your Aussie handle public encounters when you go out and about? I'd prefer a dog that didn't pull me across the street to meet a stranger. (Obviously this reflects training but it also deals with personality. An aloof dog, like a GSD, isn't likely to go out of its way to chase down strangers.)
 

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@AmoraAndCounting - In my experience, "Mini Aussies" are crazy. The ones I've met (and I meet way more of these than standard Aussies) are hyperactive, neurotic, and so, so, soooo barky. I'm not a fan. I will say, even show-line or sport bred Aussies can surprise you with the amount of herding instinct they have, sometimes it is just hardwired in.

Levi LOVES agility. He lets out kind of a "scream" when we are getting ready to go. Before getting too antsy, I think he could probably go 2-3 days, but I definitely wouldn't go longer than that. He just had to be calm for 10 days while my BC was recovery from her spay, and it was tough, but we got through it. Although I guess it depends on your perception of light work. For me, light work would be an easy hour walk, for my BC light work would be a day of fetch/chase, my Aussie, light work would be a couple hours of play.
He struggled with loose-leash walking for a while, but that was 100% my fault. He had such a great natural check in, that we did a lot of off leash hiking and didn't focus so much on the leash walking. :p

We can comfortably walk along our waterfront, which is filled with people and dogs (Thanks Pokemon Go) and he walks really nicely. He also is my demo dog in class, and he just chills on his cot while people and their dogs are working. As a puppy he wanted to meet everyone, but as he's aged a little bit, he's significantly more aloof.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What's an average day like for your BC? I've never met one in person and from what I read, sick days are not an option, haha. However, my heart is torn between an Aussie and a Spoo. Both come with their own challenges but ugh, such beautiful dogs that'd love it in my house.
 

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An average day, you say? We get up at 7, have breakfast, and snuggle on the couch while I eat my cereal. Then we go for an hour walk. We come back and she usually has a nap. Throughout the course of the day we do several (...maybe 6?) 5-15 minute training sessions. Interspersed we also go outside, fetch, the dogs play and nap with each other, and sometimes (3 times a week maybe) we go to the park to play with friends. She also is in an intermediate obedience class once a week (but only because I teach it and she needs something to do).
This past week with her spay was horrible, but she is very happy to have her activity again.
 

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I think there is a common misconception that you need to run a Border Collie (or any dog really) for hours a day. All that creates is a dog that requires massive amounts of exercise every day.
She is just over a year now, so still a bit of an adolescent. Honestly, she was fine. Classic puppy. She had a difficult time housebreaking, but that wasn't her fault, she had a pretty bad case of hookworms followed by giardia, poor thing.
She was a pretty good puppy, I don't think any better or worse than any puppy. Except she was a serious nipper (BCs!), but she also caught on to training super fast! That said, it's nice to be home with her all day, that helps to keep her occupied.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Would you say that she's particularly affection? Amora, my corgi mix, is pretty reserved. Only wants to cuddle at bedtime, if that, and I definitely want a snuggle bug down to cuddle whenever.
 

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My Aussie has been a cuddler since day one! He always has to be near you, on you, with his head on your head if you're laying down. MY BC was quite aloof for a long time. Probably up until 8 months. She's very cuddly now (I'm typing this on the couch and she is curled up on my feet, the Aussie is on the floor right beside me), but she was very distant for a long time, it was sad.
 
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