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I have a mini dachshund. Shes small, about 7 to 8 lbs and i have been working on potty training her with consistency for about 2 1/2 years now that I've had her. As you can expect of the breed shes very bad with it. Shes picky in the rain and cold and i have to actually make sure she pees or she wont go (yes even in the morning with no potty break for 8-9 hours) i take her out every 4-5 hours during the day after her initial morning pee, and once more right before bed regardless. She still occasionally poops in her crate, but i have not seen her pee in it in a long time. I honestly attribute that to her not getting it all out before bed maybe because of it being too cold at night and her rushing inside.


Shes just started to sit by the door to signal me she needs to pee. We give her extreme praise when she does so and let her out immediately.

Problem is, she very rarely does this.

I rarely have problems with her pooping inside, but she constantly pees inside. I cant even let her have a blanket in her crate or shell pee in it and sleep on it. Ive had to throw away 4 beds because ive noticed they're covered in a ridiculous amount of pee. She sleeps on her pee constantly. She is a very timid doggo, and i dont know if her sleeping on her pee and being timid are related, but i find it disgusting and want to eliminate that. So i got rid of her bed and then i see that she started peeing on pillows and a couch i have. So now i have to ban her from all cozy soft things because thats what she likes to pee on.

With all that history out of the way heres my real question:

Will getting her a litterbox help reduce or at least control where she pees in my home? Or do i have a bigger problem on my hands? I hate puppy pads and 100% refuse to use them. I understand that her breed is very bad with training, but could giving her someplace ok and easily accessible in the house to pee in help my issues?
 

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You could try but there is no reason a dachshund should be any harder to house train than any other breed.

If you are going to train her, it relies on you being aware she is about to pee just before she does it so you could take her to a litter box - and if you are doing that, surely it would be just as easy to take her out?

Has she had a vet check to see if it really is a behavioural issue and not in fact a medical one?
 

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I agree with @JoanneF .. You need to make sure there is no medical reason for this behaviour.
I know two young dachshunds Eddie is about 5 months and already asking at the door to go out, the other is a little older and his owner has said he is also very good and only has an odd accident if they are not quick enough to respond to his cries for attention when he needs to go out. So simply blaming the breed is not the answer.
Your dog has a problem either medical or behavioural and either way it needs attention. Puppy pad or litter box it comes down to the same thing, you making your house into a toilet for her.
Training and timing seem essential in this case, could you be missing her cues ?If she is timid they might be very subtile..

I would get a full vet check and if that shows no medical problems then replan and re-start training.
 

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When she does ask to go out, or whenever she toilets in the garden, do you go out there and praise & treat her when she performs? If she checks out OK medically, this might be what you're missing. Also, assuming medical problems are ruled out, you should probably take her out much more frequently - at least every 1-2 hours.

Make sure you wash her bedding and all other accidents with a biological/enzyme-based cleaner. If there's any lingering smell (which may be far to faint for you to notice), it will encourage her to go in the same spot or on the same bedding again.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have had her checked medically, i thoroughly researched her breed as well and apparently daschunds are just more stubborn (even to the point of joking about it). Its a behavoiral issue for sure.

I notice when she smells around and is about to pee. Ive tried taking her out earlier and she just never needed to go. I found 4 hours is her perfect time frame.

However when she does pee its never when im around to catch her.

Honestly, ive tried everything and im very routine and thorough. I praise her when she does well. Every time she pees i immediately "good girl!" Her. I know im making it sound like "its not me, its her", but im being honest when i say i do everything i can to make sure she succeeds. And if getting her a litterbox will stop her from peeing on furniture or her bed i will do it.
Also i buy enzymatic cleaners by the container so i always have it handy for a refill.

My real question is just... will the litterbox help? Y/N
 

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Never mind. Me and my husband talked and decided against the litterbox. We dont want to OK peeing in the house. Weve just decided we'll restart training her again.

Our route will be back to the basics and crating her while we leave the house. Id love to get her to a point of being able to let her have blankets in her crate but everytime i introduce them to her she suddenly starts peeing in her crate overnight. Wish us luck on our endeavors .
 

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What have the vet checked for, what tests have been made?

The toileting inside isn’t normal and there must be an underlying problem. You can’t just solve the problem that you experience from the symptoms of the issue. In this case the peeing inside is a symptom of an issue. So you, getting a litter box would only get rid of the problem you’re experiencing, that she pees on the furniture and would not solve the real problem. Why does she pee inside? Isn’t she housebroken correctly? Can she have a medical issue? Is it due to anxiety? Etc. You need to solve the root of the problem, not fight its symptom.

Why would it be harder to housetrain a dachshund? Yes they are quite stubborn as a breed but they’re not dumb. It might be harder to motivate them into collaborate with you in training, but that doesn’t effect training like housebreaking. So her being a dachshund has nothing to do with it.

I don’t understand, you say that she constantly pees inside but at the same time you say that 4 hours time frame is perfect. That doesn’t add up. If she constantly pees inside you haven’t found the right time frame.

Can you describe her walking routines? For example, for how long do you walk her in the evening? Does she get time to do her business so she won’t have to do it in her crate?
 

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Well good luck with the training. One tip that might help is to keep a diary just for toilet training. Make a note of her routine and mark any mistakes to see if there's a pattern.. Do let us know how you get on.
 

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Never mind. Me and my husband talked and decided against the litterbox. We dont want to OK peeing in the house. Weve just decided we'll restart training her again.

Our route will be back to the basics and crating her while we leave the house. Id love to get her to a point of being able to let her have blankets in her crate but everytime i introduce them to her she suddenly starts peeing in her crate overnight. Wish us luck on our endeavors .
I saw this post after I posted. It’s great that you’ve scratched the idea of a litter box. Crating her might cause her anxiety and be a reason that she does pee/poop inside. Is it possible to leave her in maybe a puppy pen instead?
 

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Has she ever been scolded for toileting indoors? Dogs cant make the distinction between you being annoyed at them for TOILETING, as opposed to toileting INDOORS. So if you get cross, they want to avoid your reaction and they may seek out or create opportunities to toilet when you are somewhere else.

Hard as it is, try not to react at all - not even a slump of your shoulders or an eye roll, dogs can be very tuned into our body language.
 
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