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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,
My family has reached the point where we have decided that we want a young Lhasa Apso puppy from a reliable breeder. A member of our family is very scared of dogs but has agreed to let us get one. However, she wants to get a trainer that can train the dog to stay away from her and out of the room that she's in. I know that this not much of a practical thing to get a puppy to do, but I believe that the person who is afraid will get used to our puppy and see how cute they are !!
1- Are there any good trainers that you could recommend in the Boston,Massachusetts area?
2- Is it possible to train a dog to stay away from a specific person?
3- How does training work? Is it appointments everyday or keeping them there for a couple of weeks? (this would be right after the dog is ready to come to us from the breeder)
Thanks :)
 

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I can't help with recommendations (other than the general good advice to look for someone who uses 'positive' and 'force free' training) but if you buy baby gates and a pen, you can keep your puppy contained.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks,
Do you know how training works? How would the dog get trained by a professional trainer that can keep it away from a certain person and teach it not to poo/pee in the house?
 

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Training works by showing the dog what you want him to do, and rewarding him for it. So toilet training works by taking the dog outside and every time he toilets outside, he is rewarded. Indoor accidents get no reaction from you. Once the puppy has the physical ability to hold his toilet, he will try to hold it until he is out in order to earn his reward. To keep him away from a certain person is a big ask and to be.honest is probably far easier to achieve by management. For example you could construct a barrier around the person (like a sort of play pen).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was wondering about a trainer as in a person like I've heard people talking about. Is it expensive to hire a trainer and should we just do it ourselves though we are really busy. We are moving in the summer so we wanted the dog ASAP so it wouldn't ruin our new house right when we got there. Unfortunately, that would mean getting the dog in the middle of the year which means that we would have to leave it alone for 5-6 hours as a puppy. Is this ok and I thought that a trainer will make it easier for him to adjust without causing separation anxiety.
 

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If you have a choice of bringing a new puppy home during the school vacation, I might suggest waiting until then. In any case, you're going to want to restrict your new puppy's access to the house until it's been house-trained and not chewing up everything in sight. That's going to mean setting up baby gates and keeping your puppy where you can supervise it. I might suggest checking out the youtube channels of trainers like kikopup and Zac George. You'll want to look for positive reinforcement trainers.

One thing to keep in mind is that puppies are a lot of work. The time and commitment required is not unlike bringing home a newborn baby. If you've never owned a dog before, and even if you have, you're going to be surprised by how much effort it's going to take. Bringing in a trainer is a great investment, but the main job of trainers is to train you and your family on how to work with your puppy.

One last thing to consider is your back-up plan is if your fearful family member doesn't come around. There's something to be said about adopting a lower-energy, less demanding, middle-aged or older dog.
 

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Can I be blunt? There are a lot of red flags here.

Someone doesn't like dogs - puppies are exuberant, curious and lively, expecting a pup to avoid one person is going to be tough.

Housetraining - this involves taking a puppy out every 45 minutes or so until the dog has the physical control to hold his bowel and bladder. If you are going to be out, you can't do that.

Separation anxiety - again, supporting a puppy means very gradually building up the time he is left alone.

Wanting to hand over training to someone else - a good trainer trains you to train your puppy - I'm just not feeling your commitment to the time and effort.

There's nothing wrong with not having the time to commit but maybe this isn't the best time for you. Rather than thinking about why you want a dog, what is it that you can offer a dog?

And - maybe I am wrong here but your writing style gives me the impression you are quite young. If so, what happens when your life changes, as it undoubtedly will?
 

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I'm sorry. I'm actually 46 and I think I can support a dog.
In this case your age isn’t relevant. What’s relevant is your competence and what you’re able to offer the dog. It really sounds like you need to learn more about dogs. I’m not saying that you would be a bad dog owner, but for now, it sounds like you have too little knowledge of what it takes to be owning a dog.

You could teach a dog to stay away from a room or a person (a room is easier), but with a puppy it will be a process and you need to be good at training dogs. You could absolutely bring in a dog trainer that gets you on the right track and helps you, but they won’t teach the dog. They will give you the tools on how you should train the dog. It’s you that have to put in all the time and hard work.

Same with housebreaking and the separation anxiety, It’s you who will be training the puppy, and it will take time and commitment for months. You can absolutely not leave a puppy for 5-6 hours, there’s no way around that. It’s statements like this that indicates that you’re not ready for a dog yet. I would suggest to read more about dogs, how they work, how to care for them and how to train them. With more knowledge your dog will have a better life and you as a dog owner will be much happier, trust me :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for your advice, the reason I thought I could leave a puppy at home is because my friends recently got a puppy and she is the main one helping me with this process. She's already leaving her Pomeranian home alone for 7 hrs every day. They got the puppy when it was 2 months old and it's now 4 months old.
 

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Thank you for your advice, the reason I thought I could leave a puppy at home is because my friends recently got a puppy and she is the main one helping me with this process. She's already leaving her Pomeranian home alone for 7 hrs every day. They got the puppy when it was 2 months old and it's now 4 months old.
Okay, I’m very sad to hear that’s the situation for your friends puppy. I really suggest that you do some research on your own, It doesn’t sound like your friend knows too much. You can’t leave a puppy that long, maybe you could even educate your friend on that. Read books, read online, listen to podcasts (just don’t fall into the domination/alpha hole) to prepare yourself before getting a dog. It’s not fun to get a dog and then find out that it’s way more hard work than you thought. You need to have the interest in putting in the time and effort it takes and therefore you need to educate yourself beforehand. Owning a dog can be really hard and difficult sometimes and it’s important to know that, It’s not all fun and games.
 

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Just a disclaimer to my previous post: don’t listen to everything you read. Coming from a country that has a very different view on dog keeping from the us, I’m often shocked and disgusted by somethings that are suggestedan accepted. I wish I could recommend a specific site or book that have a good viewing on how to care for dogs but for now I unfortunately don’t have any (in English at least).
 

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If you are going to need to leave the puppy alone for a minimum of 7 hours per day, then you'd do a lot better to get a young adult dog that's a year, or more, old. That way it will at least be able to hold it's bladder for that long. It's not fair to expect a puppy to try to do that and you could very well be setting it up for failure, then you end up with a dog that never fully housetrains.

Yes, it's possible to train a dog to leave certain people alone, but you'll really have to work at it, personally I'd start by teaching leave it. Leave it means you cannot have whatever it is you are interested in. So if you spot a "yummy" chicken bone on your walk and tell your dog Leave It, it means just that, leave it. Here's a pretty good video on teaching it
In your dog's case you'd use it to teach him that he cannot go by your relative, BUT yep a bit BUT, you need to teach the command, and make sure he knows it, before you can use it to keep him away from your relative.

I do not like those board and train places, it's rare to find one that does not use punishment to teach a dog, and I've seen them ruin dogs that have a sensitive temperament.
 

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The key to avoiding separation anxiety is to start off by being there all the time, and increasing 'home alone' time veeeery gradually. A good book on the subject is Patricia McConnell's 'I'll Be Home Soon'.

As for avoiding the fearful person - that will be a work in progress for a long time, and your dog will also sense that the person is anxious, which will increase your dog's anxiety and maybe make her seek out this person to check on her because she's being a bit scary. I think you should aim for your dog to regard this person as 'meh, not interesting' rather than someone to avoid. I also think you would have better results 'training' this person to be able to be around the dog, the two of them simply ignoring each other even when they just happen to be near each other. And the person has to be able to cope with the odd occasion when the dog does try to interact with her.

If the person is too afraid of dogs to manage this, then I don't think it would be right to introduce a dog into the household. I have a friend who is dog phobic and is OK around my dog as he's naturally quite reserved and it's only for a short time, but no way could she share her own house with a dog.
 

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I apologise for suggesting you were young but the rest of my concerns still stand and I agree with the people who have posted above.
 

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I don't know any trainers in your area. I don't know anyways by training a dog to stay away from a person but a command might be effective, the puppy will get used to the person with time but it might not be vice versa.

You might need someone to teach or give you tools since you're a "noob" on how to coach the puppy yourself or at least a guide.

You can train the puppy yourself but you always need to be patient and kind to him. You cannot correct the pet by causing pain, fear or anxiety.

You can reward the dog by feeding it some treats, cuddling, say nice things or give it some toys. Remember thou, you cannot overdo rewarding it so that it won't affect your coaching.

Keep in mind that some dogs get distracted very easily. Make sure that no one is around during the work. As soon as you feel that he is already bored, you better stop because his attention is already somewhere else.
The younger the dog is when you start with the training, the easier it will be for them to teach and complete the required tasks.

I hope that you’ll be successful in training your puppy after putting some works on it.
 

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I also found books ( one ebook) and CDs that might help pet-owners out there, It's from Dan Stevens who is a professional dog trainer. It will teach you the tricks to solve your pet's behavioral problems and also explain the reason for those. Remember thou, you need to be patient because you will do it step-by-step or every day like I did with "Chiko", it's 5 minute-ish daily and it took me and my brother ten days for him to stop pooing indoor but it's worth it.
You can check the product on https://18b8721az6miny9djmvfcn4z7a.hop.clickbank.net/

Good luck : )
 

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@doggomania, I don't know Dan Stevens' work (could you outline his approach please? I don't follow links I don't recognise and googling him, the resources are promoted but not described in detail. I'd just like to know a brief summary on how he goes about training please.
 

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I'm sorry it took me a long type to reply. His full name is Daniel Stevens actually so that's maybe why googling him did not work. Basically this is a "brief" summary that I edited:

Restrict Movements and Supervise

Be aware of your dog's movements and habits obviously make easier to correct inappropriate behaviors on the fly. Restrict access to areas where damage can occur. Do not "trust" a puppy with house training ability, even if they seem to have gotten the hang of things. When you are out of the house for short periods of time, your puppy should expect to go into their crate. If you must be away for longer periods of time, you will have to restrict access to certain rooms (garage, laundry) where accidents can happen in the short term.

Have A Regular Feeding Schedule

Dogs prefer to establish a routine. Having a regular feeding routine will not only help with overall obedience and discipline, but it will also enable you to monitor "output" by monitoring "input." Do not free-feed puppies & run; always remove leftover food after 15 or 20 minutes. This will teach your puppy to eat up when food is available, and will also encourage him to function to your schedule rather than his. Remember that puppies need to relieve themselves within half an hour of eating and drinking, so ensure that your schedule has taken this into account.

Use Positive Reinforcement

It has been shown that even though catching a dog in the act and intervening to discourage the behavior is effective in modifying the behavior, giving the dog praise and reward if they get it right is even MORE EFFECTIVE in getting results. Depending on your training regime, you may or may not use actual treats to encourage the desired behavior. The enthusiastic tone of voice and physical praise, however, goes a long way in any training scenario (often males need a bit of extra advice in terms of "softening" their voice so that it is less severe and entirely non-threatening).

Accompany your Dog

Quite simply, there is no way you can offer guidance and positive reassurance if you are not actually present. Early on at least, until the pup is at least three to four months old, you need to accompany your dog, every time and all the way, to the appropriate toileting area. There are even adult dogs that prefer to toilet only when they are accompanied by their owner because they know they are doing the right thing and making mom or dad happy. This is especially important on rainy days or days when the outdoors are not so inviting. If your dog sees that you have no intention of going outside, chances are they will think twice about it too.

Always Use the Same Place

The best way to avoid confusion and accidents is to consistently use the same area you designated to begin with, rather than continually changing it during the training process. This applies to both the paper training method and the direct method. Using a designated spot consistently also means that you need to keep it clean: always pick up piles on a regular basis so that the dog is not put off by an unhygienic bathroom.

Use "Accidents" to Train

It is possible to use accidents to your advantage in the house training process, and not just see them as an occasional setback - and an inconvenient mess. First, it is important that you thoroughly clean the site of the accident, as dogs tend to go back to spots that they have gone on before. Because urine contains ammonia, owners need to avoid any cleaning products that are ammonia-based. Also, they should avoid anything with a strong smell, which effectively continues to "mark" the site of the accident. After cleaning the area, use an odor neutralizer. There are many products designed for pets specifically.

In addition, you should play with your dog and feed him on and near the "scene of the crime." This will communicate the purpose of the space as something other than a toilet, and they will instinctively avoid it if it becomes associated with food.

Patience

This one is the easiest to explain but the most difficult to implement. If you lose your patience when house training a puppy, you're damaging both the training that's been accomplished so far and the developing sense of trust between you and your puppy. You must be disciplined and control yourself - yes, it's frustrating, but it's all part of having a puppy. The more patient and encouraging you are, the quicker the housetraining will be and you'll have a competent pup in no time.

This is summary might not be good since there's a lot of content on the book that tackles things other than training your puppy.

I still recommend Daniel Stevens' book because it does not just teach you how to train a dog, additionally, it addresses many other areas such as dog care, dog ownership, dog health problems, and innovative commands and tricks. The most frequent and most annoying dog difficulties in particular biting, barking, jumping up, digging, aggression, anxiety, as well as basic disobedience, are all covered in depth.

It covers everything a new or potential dog owner needs to know about their dog, including; What to think about before even thinking about adopting a puppy, choosing a breed/breeder, dealing with vets, different types of dog training, understanding your dog, general dog obedience, aggression (a major problem), biting, Coprophagia, chewing, digging, dog whispering, jumping, dog anxiety, dog tricks and many other, less common aspects of dog ownership. You can check it in my previous reply.

It has such dedicated support team. If you are having specific issues with your dog you can just email them. They also work on where "Secrets To Dog Training" needs to develop. I previously bought a book only to find that it was exactly the same book I'd downloaded before that. This further reinforced for me the value of Secrets To Dog Training's customer service, knowing that the information you receive is the most comprehensive, up to date methods and techniques available.



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