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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
3yr old husky. Super energetic dog. I know his former owner and his history & i can count on my hands the number of walks he has been on in his entire life..... yeah sad.

He is a wreck on a leash. He pulls nonstop all directions, tangling me and him up somehow. If he sees people or animals he whines loudly, goes berserk pulling and jumping and worse barks nonstop loudly. That is actually quite embarrassing lol

I want to start leash training him as well as walking him more to burn off his energy. He has some impulse control issues like getting overly excited over everything, chasing the cats, etc... and one of the major things suggested to me as burning off his energy/walking him alot more.

When he gets like this though he just shuts me out where I can not get through to him or get his attention (I am working on teaching him stay, look at me, leave it in the house to hopefully help with that)

I have watched videos and alot of them say to burn off his energy before training. But I don't really have a way to do that... so far he has shown very little interest in playing. I have tried a variety of toys, nothing. I have a small yard that is not yet fenced in (it will be when the weather is nicer).

I live in a small town with no dog parks & there are no normal parks within a doable distance for me currently. I do have an empty field behind my house. A crazy elderly neighbor yelled at me for having dogs back there before... Idk if it is ok or not to use it. I see other people take their dogs back there. I always clean up after my dogs. But he would have to be on leash/or my 25 foot lead & he is really not comfortable on them. And tends to just chill by me/whines so far.

I am planning on getting a harness with a front facing hook as I have read positive things about them.

I guess my real question is what is the best way to go about this.

I can just keep working on the inside training of leave it, look at me, stay, etc... but I fear with his built up energy he will not be quite in the mood to work with me?

I can take him for walks without training to just burn off energy, but I fear letting him go crazy like he has been on walks will just make it more difficult to train later.

Or do u think I should just try leash training even though he is so ramped up?

I just want to set him up for success.
 

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aren't huskies also used for pulling?
perhaps try letting him pull, for example a cart or you on inliners/ a bike.
just to see if he likes it (but do it somewhere, where there isn't a street and cars around).
you could use a pulling harness for pulling and a normal flat collar for "proper leash walking", so he doesn't get confused.
plus I'd try training leash walking in the house and then step by step train in areas with more stimuli.
have him tied with a leash to you during the day and just have him not on a leash for things you really want to be alone (like on the toilet for example.).
at first it is annoying but they get used to the leash and it becomes normal for them.
 

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Can you go places where you can use the 25 ft lead? Try recalls, running away when you recall, and treat, or toss the treat behind so he runs further. It does sound exhausting though. I am doing the long line thing with Sonic right now, takes energy! I'm not always up to it.
Flirt pole, if you can get him to chase the toy (this also works on a long line).
Tug (if you can get him to tug) works on a 6 ft leash.
And training indoors, can you get him to do high action tricks, jumping, spinning? Maybe that can transfer to outdoor games.
And, well, sledding comes to mind...
 
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Have you tried a flirt pole for burning off his energy? The huskies I know have crazy prey drive and have loved the flirt so this may be an idea to drain his energy.

Have a look at the video I'll post below, it details the 300 peck method for LLW, I find it very helpful, the dog in the video is an Akita so not your stereotypical 'easy' breed to teach nice leash manners so just shows you it works well with all breeds.

You can drain some of his energy then try and work with him for short period. Don't expect it to work quickly, keep at it and don't lose momentum, I find using a hands free leash also helps.

http://youtu.be/EyG0oF5-d0w
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I decided to try him out on the long lead in the field tonight. He did much better. He got tangled in the lead a bit. But he ran alot. We are all exhausted.

I worked on recall a bit with him and he did ok but not great. My other dog has 100% perfect recall & I tried her by using a long lead and running then turning the other way and calling her. So hopefully it works with him lol

The only real problem was whenever i called my other dog back to me Koda (the husky) got all bossy to her lol Like she isnt in trouble & u r not her boss! lol

My other dog is so silly though she had to poo & ran back to my yard to potty.

So I will make that our new thing.


mathilda -
I'd love to try maybe having him pull a scooter like urban mushing. But I think with his issues with the leash and how crazy he gets he will have to calm down alot before that lol

I do like the idea of just putting the leash on him for nothing & practicing in the house.

Artdog -
I am still working on finding a treat he actually will work for lol I am going to try chicken and see how that works. He is super picky. Won't even touch hot dogs!

I would love to get a flirtpole, that was my plan. But he is just so uninterested in toys and playing so far. I have tried different types of toys and he seems to prefer specific stuffed toys. But I have only gotten him to play with me once so far and it lasted a few minutes before he decided he was done. He seems to prefer chase rather then tug or fetch. I think me trying to get him to fetch it annoyed him lol Maybe I can try chase outside hmm

BusterBCsMum -
Thanks for the video. I think that is a good way to try that. I will work on that!

Thanks everyone so much
 

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Yoki was a wild one when we got her. The day we adopted her, I felt like we were adopting a little 70lb wild horse! Our walks were a disaster! She pulled to the point where she was choking herself with the amount of pressure she would force on her collar. And, if she saw a squirrel or even so much as a leaf blowing in the wind, forget it! The prey drive hasn't gone away but it's not as pronounced as it used to be. It all took time, practice and patience but our walks are so much more enjoyable now.

I think of her calmness like a big wheel. This is a strange analogy..but hear me out.. When you first try to get the Wheel of Calmness (hahah!) going, it's hard to move it along and it takes some good pushes but once you get it going you just have to keep tapping it to keep it moving. Make sense? In other words, it was a lot more work in the earlier days with her walks and training but eventually, all the pieces start to fall into place and it gets a lot easier.

She's always been a very high energy dog so I came up with a few ways to make the walks more pleasant for her and I and keep her continually satisfied. All of this obviously goes along with off leash play and other regular training:

1) Speed Walk - I think Yoki's natural walking pace is pretty quick to begin with. So, she was constantly frustrated by how slow I was going and it had her darting from side to side as we walked. Since speeding up my pace, she seems to walk better.

2) Add extras to the walk - To make every walk more interesting and exhausting for her, I treat each walk like an agility hike all over the city. As we walk, I get her to jump up on and off anything above ground level and I go up and down every set of stairs I see with her. If I find a good brick wall that she can jump up on, I make her do it over and over again. If there's a row of trees or empty bicycle racks, we would zig zag through them. She loves the challenge and it gets her more tired on each walk.

3) Stop for Off Leash Time - stop midway through your walk for some off leash time if you can. It gives her a break and it's also a chance to let her run around and burn off extra energy before you continue with leash training.

4) Practice a strict "heel" when walking. I think a strict heel is important for her because she loses focus very easily and I found the more leeway I gave her, the more she took. So, we practice a strict heel at all times to be sure she's clear on what she's supposed to be doing when we walk. To teach her this, I used the method where you stop in your tracks and walk the other direction as soon as she starts pulling. It was INSANELY frustrating at the beginning but it really does catch on over time. It no longer takes us a half an hour just to get down the street.

4) Weight Vest - in the early days, we used a vest with cans of soup in the sides. Look up guidelines on how much weight to start with based on their age & weight (generally the limit is 20% of their body weight but you want to start out with less and work up to it). But, this was a great help in getting her more tired.

Hope this gives you some ideas! Good luck!
 
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