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I recently adopted a new puppy, and am looking for some input for when I’m at work. We’ve been leaving him in a kennel while at work, but he seems to hate it. He’s broken out of one kennel and destroyed our room as a result.

This just recently became an issue because my fiancé got a new job, and our new schedules create some conflict with the puppy. He’s rarely in his kennel for more than 4 hours, however, there have been a few days where it has been needed.

He’s an indoor dog, and want him to stay an indoor dog, however, we are contemplating leaving him outside on days where he may be in his kennel too long. We would of course bring him back in when we get home.

We have a fenced in yard, plenty of space, several areas for shade, and plan to leave toys and food/water out on the patio.

Do you think this will help get some of his energy out during the day? Seems like a much better alternative to leaving him in his kennel.

He’s a 5 month old Australian Shepherd. He gets plenty of exercise and attention when we are not at work, and gets out to the dog park 3-5 times a week. He doesn’t have too many behavioral issues unless he’s kenneled up for too long.

Thanks,
Chad
 

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By kennel you mean crate, correct? I would highly recommend you do not leave him outside, fenced yard or not, there is so much that can go wrong; digging out, getting into something, barking and bothering people around you, or simply getting stolen, which is a real possibility since he is a purebred.

What I would recommend you doing is putting up a playpen for him when you are going to be gone for longer periods, giving him some nice entertaining toys such as a stuffed Kong, and making sure you tire him out with a walk or run right before you leave for work. As I am sure you are aware, Aussies are very high energy and can easily get bored, play brain games with him as well, this often will tire out a dog better than physical exercise. You can also look into getting a dog walker, or doggie daycare on those days when you will be gone longer, or even a willing neighbor to help out.
 
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If it's safe to leave the dog outside depends on the area you live in, if dogs are getting stolen where you live (it seems to be happening in the county adjacent to mine), if the dog is a digger, climber, or general escape artist, what's the weather like, and if you have shelter, and if the dog is a barker.

I used to leave Shadow and Jersey outside while I was at work, but I had a completely secure yard, the yard was set way back from the street, neither were barkers, they had good shelter if a storm blew up, the weather was good, neither were Houdini dogs, and dog theft was not a problem where I lived. I mainly left them out because Jersey preferred it and was happiest outside during the day even if I was home. My new dog Zody would be miserable outside all day even if I had a yard for him to be in.

Before you make the decision to leave your dog alone in the yard, please know the dangers and there are many and they are real, and make an educated decision that is the best possible one for your dog. If your dog should escape the yard he can get into all sorts of trouble, worse case scenario is he manages to get himself seriously hurt or killed.
 

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what I did for my dog is get one of these
https://www.petsmart.com/dog/crates...4-panel-plastic-pet-pen-6585.html?cgid=100229
And created a safe space for her in our living room. I would leave toys, water, and brain games (with treats hidden in them) in with her, and by the time I would get back home after school I would come home to an almost tired dog. I usually connected it to her kennel so she would also have a place to sleep and feel comfortable in. Try taking your Aussie out for a walk/run beforehand because a tired dog is a good dog.?
 

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OUTSIDE un-supervised, esp'ly "home alone", is a Bad Idea.

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dogs left outside with no-one at home develop many, very-predictable problem behaviors -
#1 is nuisance-barking by the hour, which may be protest barks [Arf... arf... arf..., like a metronome], reactive barking [at noises off, which are perfectly normal activities, or at passersby who present no threat], or simple boredom - barking is something to do.

The next most-common is a toss-up between digging & destroying -
a bored dog will amuse themselves digging, or self-sooth when they're stressed by CHEWing. Chewing isn't just for pups; dogs chew lifelong, & coming home to a formerly-100-ft garden hose that's now in hunks no bigger than 2 to 3-ft max is not a happy thing.
A yard that looks like London after the blitz is not pretty, cratered with holes that might bury a Volkswagen down to bucket-size, interspersed with humps of dirt & uprooted sod or plants.

Along with safety concerns & problem behaviors, puppies are endlessly curious & EVERYthing goes in their mouths - if it fits, they mouth it, gnaw it, or at least taste it.
Treated lawns are dangerous to dogs - grub treatment, Weed-n-Feed, fertilizers, herbicides, snail-bait is a gourmet poison, fungicides, & cide-cides. :(
Lawn-care companies use products well-known to cause bladder cancer in dogs - if U treat Ur lawn, limit the dog's exposure to a minimum.

Many garden plants are toxic, too - bored pups don't know the difference, & frankly don't care.

Wolf's story:
My elder-sis bought a somewhat-stressy GSD as a pup at 10-WO; he hit 5-MO & began gnawing sofa-cushions as a hobby. Her DH / my BiL parked him in their 3/4-acre fenced yard during work-hours, planted with lilies [toxic], roses, a Buddleia, tulips, iris, a 40-ft pecan tree, lilacs, etc.
He immediately became a barking fool, but they weren't home & BiL Jerry didn't give a rat's patoot - the neighbors would just have to deal. :eyeroll:

3-mos later, he'd been to the vet's 2X for poison treatments [eating lily bulbs, ate snail-bait FROM THE BAG in the closed-but-not-locked garden shed] & 2/3 of the yard was grass-free mud.
There wasn't a single shrub left; 6 roses, 2 butterfly-bushes each 5 to 6-ft tall & 4-ft thick, all gone; 3 lilac clumps over 30-yrs old reduced to knee-high stubs. The bulbs were all dug-up & half had been eaten - lots of charcoal & emetics, big vet bills.
Crabgrass & moss were all that was left, scattered over the mud & chewed hunks of branches.

At 9-MO, it was cold outside, so Peg left him in the garage to keep him from trashing the house while she ran a quick errand. // Bad idea - he pulled a gallon of antifreeze off a shelf, punctured it, & lapped up the oozing fluid.
She put him directly in the car when she saw it, even tho she didn't KNOW if it was dangerous, & started for the vet's again - he began to seize in the backseat, so she's driving like Andretti & telling the dog to hold on, we'll be there sooon... another near-death experience.

A few weeks after he recovered from antifreeze poisoning, he bit my nephew, David. Peg had gone thru H*** trying to get pregnant, they adopted when fertility was hopeless, & despite the fact that DAVID was to blame for the bite, & he cried bitterly over the result, the dog was donated to the City police-dept.
6-mos later, she was still mourning the loss of her dog - whom she'd truly loved, despite his destructive behavior - but she was replanting her yard.

- terry

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@Cml207

I suppose it depends on your situation and the area you live.

I left 2 of my previous dogs outside in my absence until I could trust them inside with full house privileges. However, even though the backyard was fenced in, I still built a 24' X 20' enclosure which was 8' tall and a locking door. I had a dog house it could access through a dog door in the back door to the garage but that was it, no access to the rest of the garage.

Lots of reasons I wouldn't just leave my dog in the backyard, many have been cited already. I do know people that leave their dogs out all day in their fenced-in backyards and I guess I like their optimism but it's just not for me.
 

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You could get a puppy play pen for inside I can leave mine across in their 40acre play ground fine but I'm right across the road no one is going to take them. I would out a play pen in your house just so they can't get stolen( that tends to happen a lot).

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Aussies are big time barkers, so if you're planning on leaving him outside, be aware he could cause some major issues with your neighbours. I also think you'd be very surprised by how little self-entertaining dogs do outside. If I put both of my dogs in the backyard together, they will sit at the door and wait for me to come out.

Aussies are people dogs, meant to hang out with their shepherds all day, so I'm sure poor guy is having a rough adjustment period.

I would recommend puppy-proofing a room, or getting a playpen to give him some extra space to roam around, with the possibility of hiring a dog walker to come give him a short walk/potty break during the day.
 
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@Esand - Where is Simba hiding in that picture? :D
 
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