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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a number of fairly new plants in my yard. We bought the house in 2013 and there was nothing. We now have two fruit bearing trees, and a bunch of lilacs and forsythias. I have two dogs. A three year old Terrier/Pit and a 2 year old Chihuahua. After a couple of years of learning from all of us, every thing is now encased with chicken wire and they always have sticks to chew on. If they're playing chase, they avoid obstacles fairly well. If they are watching a squirrel on a power line, they might not. My question is...what is a recommended dog deterrent that may help improve current aesthetics? I'm mainly concerned about the flower bushes that line the fence.

Odor deterrents have only been tried on my Terrier who doesn't hate hot sauce, but will run from vinegar.

Would love to know what everyone uses or has tried to use! Thanks!
 

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I don't know what your chicken wire fencing looks like, but mine only keeps the dogs out because they respect it as a boundary and don't run into it or jump over it, the fence is pathetic!

I'd section off that part of the garden with makeshift fence, like the moveable-for-chicken-runs type that is taller and more visible, so that the dogs would get used to running on the other side only. Play with them over there to reinforce this. Train them to relax and behave in the thin strip by the plants, giving them a tasty lasting chew, supervising them to ensure they behave, ready to redirect back onto a chewy treat if they venture into the plants, etc. to establish good habits there. If they insist, give them an "Eh, eh!" and if they persist, remove them from that area (forfeiting a chewing session there - they get the treat the next time you practice there).

Gradually let them have access to that area unsupervised as they learn to behave. That will be a process and YMMV. The aim would be to train them to behave that way so that even when you remove the fence, they respect the boundary/plants. You have to invest and spend the time out there with them.

Good luck with finding what works best for you! :)
 

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I taught my dogs to stay out of the gardens, and they know 'out of the garden' too. They are pretty good about it, winter is the hardest because most of the plants die back. What are your dogs doing? Digging, chewing? You could look into a decorative fence. I did have to put up a small one around the asparagus bed, they were using it as a short cut and I don't want them stepping on the new spires coming up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I have noticed that they respect the boundaries in some cases. Running with the neighbor's dog along one section of fence, they will typically avoid the chicken wire circles I've made. It's maybe an 80% success rate.

The fence section that goes along the alley. That's the trouble spot. Especially if someone is IN the alley. They will run up and down the fence line without a lot of regard for anything in their path. Fortunately, out of all of the plants I've put along there (upwards of 10), I've only lost two. However, when you are trying to create a flower bush fence...it delays things.

Once our rainy days end (or at least get less common than now), I should be able to monitor them better and hopefully be able to shoot them with the hose if they start going nuts. Alley traffic isn't always predictable though.

Is there a good way to apply an odor deterrent? I think that my big guy at least is adverse to a vinegar and I'm not opposed to something that will retain a smell.
 
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