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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so here's the deal, we're about to get a new puppy but my parents say it has to stay Outside. I didn't like that idea at first and I tried to convince them that it should be in the house but it was to no avail, both my parents come from the culture that dogs belong outside and told me that every dog they had was outside and was fine and most lived up to old age. When I tried to tell them that the pup won't know who his master is, my father said in quote "as long as you feed him he'll know who he belongs to" and they even went as far to tell me that if I had my own place they won't even bother to visit knowing I had a dog in the house (my mom especially) saying there would be hair everywhere and the place will smell like dog. If the puppy does stay outside he won't be alone, our current dog (a yellow lab) is an outside dog but he was given to us when he was 1 yr old by a relative who didn't want him anymore because he kept jumping, chewing, digging, & mouthing (stuff that dogs do) he loves being outside and doesn't even think to come inside,on one really cold winter day when it was about 20 degrees out I felt sorry for him and tried to bring inside but he nearly tear down the door trying to get back out (and he use to be a house dog) I don't mind a full grown dog being outside but I never thought a puppy can handle outdoor living. I asked different people on their perspective on keeping a dog inside vs outside to my surprise majority agreed with my parents, most said big dogs belong outside and little one belong inside and puppies can be quite messy and destroy your expensive furniture, some people say keeping them cooped up in a house all day is Cruel and it's more stimulating outside and really dogs will just snooze the day away anyway, and a few told me that outside dogs are more hardy than their spoiled wimpy indoor counterparts & even one person told me that it's better for them to start life outside the very first day you get them as a pup so they won't ever have the thought of wanting to come inside.

So after hearing all this I'm actually becoming open minded to the idea of keeping a puppy outside and think maybe it won't be so bad, but am I wrong?

What's your opinion on this?

P.S. I didn't mean to write a book but I just wanted to be as detailed as possible.
 

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My feeling is that unless you have a working dog like a livestock guardian or a very secure yard and plans to spend a significant amount of time outside more often than not, a dog - especially a puppy - should be kept inside. There are far too many things that could go wrong and the dog (puppy) would be the one to suffer.
 

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It's really mostly in Western culture and over the last 50 years or so, maybe, that dogs as indoor pets has become almost required. But millions upon millions of dogs, worldwide, spend their entire life outside. The puppy will most likely be ok, unless the weather is very extreme. And it will have the older dog for company, and you as well, if you intend to spend some time with it. I don't like dogs to be left outside when they have a perfectly good home with people right there, but realistically, that is the life of the vast majority of dogs even now.
 

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It depends on the area you live in and what kind of dog it is. Many large and medium size dogs can live happily outside, but they should always have shelter from the elements like a dog house, shed or barn. Most small dogs CANNOT live outside because they would die from the elements or be eaten by a larger animal. I don't know where you're from but obviously the culture there is that dogs belong outside. However, I think you need to make sure that the puppy has a lot of supervision in the first few months. And while your dad is right that if you feed and care for the new dog he will know you're the master, if there is another dog out there, he will bond with that dog much closer than with you. So I would spend lots of time with this dog on walks, playing, just generally being around him a lot so you bond well. Also, again, I think you really need to find a place to keep a young puppy safe and protected from elements and predators. Build a dog house, shed, if you have a garage or cellar see if that can be used. However, I will add this: If you plan on moving out of your parents' place at any time and having this dog be an indoor dog too, you need to teach him how to behave indoors too. Dogs need to be taught how to act inside and outside. If they're only taught one they won't know how to function in the other. If you have a friend or anyone who can help you teach your dog to behave indoors that would help a lot.

I also kind of resent the idea that dogs who get to go inside are "wimpy". How? We had a dog who was an inside dog and she was a great hunter. I don't know what they meant, in terms of being a guard dog or hunting or what? And my dog Stella is only 10 months and since she's raised inside she doesn't chew on the furniture, go to the bathroom indoors or really destroy anything. She does shed but that's what vacuums are for. Honestly I think Stella's less messy than most small children I've met!
 
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What kind of dog, what age, what kind of shelter will it have? What temp does it get to at night?

Puppies are kept warm by their mother so even hardy cold weather breeds can be affected by the cold if they're too young.

On the other hand if it's summer where you are and they're going to have a place to hide from the wind and rain, they'll probably be fine.
 

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Dogs are almost always dirty and even if they don't chew up the furniture your parents are right that they'll dirty the house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What kind of dog, what age, what kind of shelter will it have? What temp does it get to at night?

Puppies are kept warm by their mother so even hardy cold weather breeds can be affected by the cold if they're too young.

On the other hand if it's summer where you are and they're going to have a place to hide from the wind and rain, they'll probably be fine.
Either a rottie, bullmastiff, or gsd, a friend of mine is about to have a litter of rotties and said I can have one at 7 or 8 weeks old, the pup will have a wooden doghouse filled with straw during the winter or cedar chips in the summer (good for repelling fleas and ticks). The summer nights temps here in Charlotte are usually in the 70s while during the winter nights sometimes it'll get in the 20s but if it gets that cold I'll bring both dogs in the garage.
 

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Personally I wouldn't get a dog if I didn't want it to hang around with me, BUT that said, so long as the animal has adequate food, water and shelter outside they should be fine. It certainly doesn't hurt that they will have a labrador to keep the company.

I don't know how close your neighbors are but one thing to watch out for is nuisance barking. A lot of people don't realize how bad their outdoor dogs can get until they come home to an angry neighbor, a fine from the city OR (and this has happened in my town on more than one occasion) a poisoned dog. Just make sure your dogs are well entertained and exercised and this shouldn't be a problem.
 

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Either a rottie, bullmastiff, or gsd, a friend of mine is about to have a litter of rotties and said I can have one at 7 or 8 weeks old, the pup will have a wooden doghouse filled with straw during the winter or cedar chips in the summer (good for repelling fleas and ticks). The summer nights temps here in Charlotte are usually in the 70s while during the winter nights sometimes it'll get in the 20s but if it gets that cold I'll bring both dogs in the garage.
Sounds like an excellent setup. Don't worry about the puppy being harmed by the elements. One thing to look out for is making sure the lab doesn't become a surrogate mother because you don't want the new puppy to become too dependent on him.
 

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I prefer to keep dogs in the house, but your setup doesn't sound bad. Just make sure the dog house is plenty big enough(and there's two if you have two dogs out there) and puppy gets all his/her shots plus flea/tick and heartworm preventative.
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As long as the dog has food, water and shelter, it'll be just fine. Yes most people keep dogs inside nowadays, but it's not actually needed most of the time. Dogs are much tougher than people give them credit for.
 

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As long as the dog has food, water and shelter, it'll be just fine. Yes most people keep dogs inside nowadays, but it's not actually needed most of the time. Dogs are much tougher than people give them credit for.
But getting a puppy just to allow it the basic of needs - food, water & shelter - seems crazy to me! I could maybe understand if the puppy were to be a working dog, but why get a dog as a pet, with the expense that that can entail, like vets bills etc.... & then just keep it outside. It's not whether a dog is tough enough IMO. It sounds to me that the OP parents just aren't that much in to dogs, so why have them in the first place :confused:
 

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Sounds like an excellent setup. Don't worry about the puppy being harmed by the elements. One thing to look out for is making sure the lab doesn't become a surrogate mother because you don't want the new puppy to become too dependent on him.
Why would that be a bad thing?
 

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It depends on the dog but outside is usually ok IF the dog gets adequate socialization/fun time with its humans in addition to "food water and shelter".

If you spend time with it, take him'/her on walks and train him/her, then being an outside dog is ok.

Some breeds even prefer being outside (provided they get enough contact with the family and are not feeling lonely). Others not so much IMO. I have had only 1 close GSD experience but based on that dog, GSD is not a good "solo" living creature. They are human-centered dogs, extremely so ime. They bond fast and very hard. They are bred to work in close contact with humans (and are very good at it!).

I have a LGD and basically have to beg her to come inside (even when it`s thundering and pouring rain). She loves us and is social but very independent and doesn`t mind being on her own at all. Her ancestors lived for thousands of years guarding sheep in mountains with minimum human contact.

My landlord`s GSD on the other hand wants to spend every second glued to her owners side.

Good example: when in the yard, my dog stand guard by the front gate which is quite far from the house. The GSD sits with her back against the front door waiting to be let in.
 

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So here are my questions:

a) How much time are you and your family members committed to spending with your new puppy every day?

b) What kind of socialization, training, and exercise are you committed to providing on a daily basis?

c) Are you a student? Do you work? How much time do you realistically have in the morning, late afternoon, and evening to spend with your puppy?

d) Do you and your family spend a lot of time outdoors? Or, do you all basically spend time your non-school, non-working hours inside?

e) How much time do you all actually spend with your lab? Is your lab seen as part of the family? Or is it basically a back-yard dog that gets fed?



Honestly speaking, if the puppy is going to be relegated to the backyard all day long with maybe an hour of human interaction a day at the most, I'm not a fan. Almost two years ago, I adopted a "backyard" dog from a shelter. He was a two-year-old Great Pyrenees mix. He was found as a stray with straight, horizontal wounds across his front legs that most likely came from trying to escape a fenced enclosure.

After I brought him home, it very quickly became apparent that he had never been inside a home before and had no idea of how to behave in one. He climbed all over the furniture, including jumping on top of the dining room table on Thanksgiving. I could never leave him unsupervised because he would chew and destroy everything I had if he could.

He did not know a single command or how to walk on a leash. And, while I could teach him basic commands, the greater problem was that he had not been socialized with the world outside his backyard. He was great with other dogs, but fearful of people. I had to be careful to avoid people when we took walks as he would start lunging on the leash and barking his head off.

Lastly, because he so obviously had just been fed in someone's backyard, he never really bonded with me. Before I rehomed him two months later, I was spending around five hours a day with him. However, I don't think he even missed me when I turned over his leash. A key part of his socialization had been lost.

Yesterday, I walked through my local shelter. It is filled with former "backyard" dogs. A fair number of these dogs will be euthanized. I'd like to read what you and your family are going to do differently so that your new puppy doesn't become just another backyard dog that's unable to function well outside the confines of its fence.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't get a dog that I couldn't keep in my house. That's just me. I understand you're under your parents rules at the moment, but I would pass on a dog until I got my own place. There's nothing better than walking in the house after a long day at work to my pups happy tail and smiling face... or cuddling on the couch on a Friday night watching a rain or snow storm... or stepping on her toy in the middle of the night and having a heart attack ;)

My house does not smell like dog. My dog doesn't even smell like dog. Yep, she sheds. I sweep/vacuum every single day so it doesn't get out of hand.

Honestly, if any of my family or friends said they wouldn't come over because I have a dog in my house, I wouldn't give them another thought. You're in a tough spot and I wish you the best.

I bring my dog basically everywhere that I go- except work/school. This includes family members homes, parties, friends houses, etc. I wouldn't have it any other way.

Will your new pup be okay outside? Sure, most likely. Before you bring this pup home, I urge you to really ask yourself why you want this dog? Will you be able to devote the time needed to this pup? Dogs like interaction. I'm happy that the new pup will at least have another dog to interact with.
 

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I agree with Aspen. I think you should wait until you live independently and can bring your puppy inside.

Now, I have a lovely "indoor" dog that I adopted from a shelter. He's a Pekingese-Shih Tzu mix and he's perfectly behaved inside my home. He loves cuddling on the sofa next to me, and he and I bonded more closely while he was still at the shelter before I even adopted him than I ever did with my first dog. It's a treat to be greeted at the door when I come home by a dog whose first inclination is to lead me to the sofa.

So, in the meantime, why not spend more time with your lab? Try spending more time playing, walking, training, and interacting with the dog you already have.
 

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I have an extremely furry/fuzzy dog. I also vacuum/sweep every day. Truthfully, I don't think the house actually needs it, but it's good exercise to lug my vacuum up and down the stairs ;)
My house doesn't smell like dog. He cuddles in my bed after the alarm goes off (he's an excellent alarm clock) and he watches tv with me on my couch. Both of those things don't smell like dog either. I can't imagine people not wanting to come visit me because I have a dog, and if they felt that way, good riddance, I love my dog.
It sounds like you are the driving force behind getting the dog, I would just wait. I waited until I was on my own to get Levi, and I'm very happy about it. That way it was my rules, and no one was there to mess up my training. :p
 
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