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Hi all. We are going to have a look at the puppies tomorrow. The parents are KC reg but the puppies are not. The owner said it is simple and we can register the puppy ourself if we want. Is that right and what documents do I need him to provide. He also said that the parents did not have their eyes or hips checked but good dogs. thank you.:)
 

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Hello!

to my knowledge, as long as you get the parent's AKC Registration numbers, you can register your puppy as purebred. However, that says absolutely nothing about the quality of the dogs. What breed of dog are you looking at, and hopefully you won't find this a rude question, but how much are you potentially paying for a pup?
 

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If I were you I'd run and find a more reputable breeder.

Reputable breeders like to register all their dogs weather they go to a pet home or show home. They want people to know that this puppy came from them and that they are the breeders of this dog. (Sort of a prideful and some are very prideful.) Plus all the puppies come with limited registration if going to a home to be just a pet. (Limited means that if you should breed the puppy, you won't be able to register the puppies.)

Also, I'm worried that they didn't do the required genetic testing on the parents. What if there is a hidden genetic disease in one of the pups that could be fatal to the pups who are passed this gene?

My dog Kryesor was a good dog and healthy, but does that mean he should be bred to another 'good and healthy dog?' No because he had nothing to bring to the puppies. (Plus he was a boomified mutt)

If you are willing to risk the chance of getting a puppy with not knowing if they will be genetically healthy then by all means, ignore me and go get this pup. Maybe you will be lucky and get a puppy who is healthy, but you are taking a bigger chance then you would if you were to go through a breeder who does genetic testing. Take it this way, (90 percent the puppy is healthy because the parents were checked for genetic diseases and cleared. 25 percent that the puppy is healthy from parents who weren't checked for genetic diseases and uncertain if they are clear or not.)

Sorry to sound rude if it came out that way. I was just giving some info.
 
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I personally would not suggest buying if they haven't health tested. Depending on the breed, checking eyes and hips is imperative. I've seen people come into work with German Shepherds, labs and American bulldogs that are suffering from hip displaysia at barely a year old. Sometimes even less. These dogs will not have long lives. They will suffer a lot, not being able to run around and jump like a healthy young dog should be able to do. Their owners will likely have to make the decision to put these dogs down at the young age of around 5, because with how bad their hips were, that's about the age they will stop being able to get up. The only treatment is a full, bilateral hip replacement surgery. This runs around $3k PER HIP, and is unaffordable to most people in my community. It's an extensive surgery that requires months of rehab. And not all dogs are candidates for this anyway.

That said, again, look elsewhere. Getting a dog with bad hips is NOT worth it. Not when you can find a breeder that does x-rays and gets the hips rated to give the puppies the best chance at healthy joints. It'll cost more, but it's really not that much. Not when you consider the price of keeping a dog comfortable if it does have bad hips. Even if you don't do the $6k surgery, it's still hundreds of dollars in x-rays and pain meds and therapy to keep the muscles strong.
 

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@natenqen and @TiggerBounce both hit the nail on the head, and stated essentially what I was getting at in my first post. I would much rather have an unregistered dog, but have the parents be certified as healthy, particularly for the breeds that are known to have hips problems.
Money aside, save yourself the heartache of watching your young dog struggle to get up, walk around, and just generally be in pain.
 

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I personally would not suggest buying if they haven't health tested. Depending on the breed, checking eyes and hips is imperative. I've seen people come into work with German Shepherds, labs and American bulldogs that are suffering from hip displaysia at barely a year old. Sometimes even less. These dogs will not have long lives. They will suffer a lot, not being able to run around and jump like a healthy young dog should be able to do. Their owners will likely have to make the decision to put these dogs down at the young age of around 5, because with how bad their hips were, that's about the age they will stop being able to get up. The only treatment is a full, bilateral hip replacement surgery. This runs around $3k PER HIP, and is unaffordable to most people in my community. It's an extensive surgery that requires months of rehab. And not all dogs are candidates for this anyway.

That said, again, look elsewhere. Getting a dog with bad hips is NOT worth it. Not when you can find a breeder that does x-rays and gets the hips rated to give the puppies the best chance at healthy joints. It'll cost more, but it's really not that much. Not when you consider the price of keeping a dog comfortable if it does have bad hips. Even if you don't do the $6k surgery, it's still hundreds of dollars in x-rays and pain meds and therapy to keep the muscles strong.
There's a girl I work with who has a Bernese Mountain Dog diagnosed with severe hip dysplasia at under a year old. He can't run or play or go hiking. It's heartbreaking. They're trying to find a specialist out of state who's willing to do surgery but it's so severe that there's nothing the local vets can do. Definitely not worth the risk, especially in larger breeds.
 

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Same as everyone else - I would find a better breeder.
A client at my job has two GSDs, they're beautiful dogs, everyone loves them.. but one was diagnosed with hip dysplasia and she's only about a year old. Not even filled out yet. The owner's gonna get the surgery done. I would make sure the parents are checked on everything - they might be good dogs, but that won't stop any genetic health issues.
 
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