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Hey guys!

So I need some input/suggestions.

I just got a dog about 2 weeks ago. He's a 1 year old Plott Hound/shepherd mix. Very sweet, very loving. TONS of curious energy! He's not bad about being hyper (he'll get the occasional zoomies but they usually only last for about 5-10 minutes) but what he will do is get himself into EVERYTHING! He just has this impulse to chew/lick/smell everything that is within mouth reach (...and sometimes OUT of mouth reach :p )

I work from home so during the day I am usually in the kitchen with him (with baby gates up to keep him in). This is where we "crate" him as well because there's really nothing in there for him to get into. So during the day when I'm working, he's usually pretty calm and will just lay on his bed and play with his toys and be a perfect angel.

But then at night, when I want to go into the living room and just relax and read a book or watch TV or something, it's a whole other story. I'll put up a baby gate to keep him in the living room with me so I can supervise him - but then I feel like that is ALL I am doing. I cant really relax and just settle back and read or watch TV because I feel like I have to watch him like a hawk. Because he will just go around the room, trying to lick and chew and sniff at everything. I realize he's just being a curious puppy and exploring but I am mentally EXHAUSTED since I feel like I can't truly just unwind and rest in my own home.

What should I do...?

(btw - I know the first answer is always "EXERCISE!!!!" We actually do quite abit of that. We take him on 4 20 minute walks a day - 7:00, 12:00, 5:00 & 10:00. During the 5:00 & 10:00 walk time he also gets to go out to our local basketball court and play fetch for about half an hour as well to run off some energy. But even doing that, he's still just so curious whenever he's in the living room and it takes quite awhile for him to finally settle down in his bed or on the couch with me.)
 

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Does he have toys? Chews, interactive toys like kongs or food puzzles? He's still settling in too, in time you'll be able to sit back and relax. But for now you do have to watch him. It was like that with my dane when I got her. At first I had to keep an eye on her at all times. For potty training and making sure she didn't chew anything. Give it time, it will get better and you'll be able to sit back and relax.
 

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i agree, give it time, and give the dogs plenty of toys and chews etc. you just have to go through this differcult period. he cant help it he is just a pup. plenty of exercise, and stimulation during the day help.
 

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I definitely understand that he needs time to settle in - I'm just wondering if there might be a way to help encourage him towards becoming calmer and less inquisitive in the living room area. Something that I can do to help curb that behavior?

He does have toys and a bed in the living room and he'll play with them from time to time. But mostly he's just interested in everything else that ISNT his. :)
 

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I definitely understand that he needs time to settle in - I'm just wondering if there might be a way to help encourage him towards becoming calmer and less inquisitive in the living room area. Something that I can do to help curb that behavior?

He does have toys and a bed in the living room and he'll play with them from time to time. But mostly he's just interested in everything else that ISNT his. :)
That is Trucker too but your guy is still a puppy and you have to remember that. Hounds mature slowly and they are inquisitive so put up the things that you don't want him to mess with and reward him for relaxing/chewing on bones.
 

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I definitely understand that he needs time to settle in - I'm just wondering if there might be a way to help encourage him towards becoming calmer and less inquisitive in the living room area. Something that I can do to help curb that behavior?

He does have toys and a bed in the living room and he'll play with them from time to time. But mostly he's just interested in everything else that ISNT his. :)
Just leash him to you so he has to stay with you.
 

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This sounds like what I'm going through with my hound puppy. It's exhausting. Mostly my goals are to not encourage bad behavior and finding ways to relax without feeling guilty or annoying the neighbors.
 

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You could try using a tie down for some designated "down time". If he's not a chewer, you can use his leash, if not, get a piece of cable not more than 5' long, and put at least one swivel to prevent tangling. Secure it (eye bolt in wall or handle under a heavy piece of furniture, door knob, etc) someplace there's not anything for him to get into, and give him a nice bed and something to chew on. Exercise him well before putting him on the tie down, then hook him up and do whatever, and just keep an eye on him to make sure he doesn't do anything crazy. Once you do it a few times, he'll get the hang of it and learn that it means time to just hang out and relax. Eventually, he'll be good on the tie down even if you don't have time to exercise him heavily before, and you can do stuff outside of his immediate area. After a while, you probably won't even have to tie him if you consistently use the same spot, just take him there and give him his chew. Initially, just keep him there for a brief period of time, but you can work up to greater lengths of time (length of a movie, a 4 hour work shift, etc), just make sure he also has water nearby for longer periods. My younger dog is fine in the house, but I still use a tie down if we have company over watching a movie and I don't want him mugging people, or if the dogs are eating bones (he's a thief), and he prefers it to the crate when we're home because he's still in the thick of things.
 

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I did a lot of "Sit on the Dog" with my older dog when he was around that age:
Wheres my sanity: Sit on the Dog, aka: The long down

Ignore the parts about dominance or whatever. The important part is the method. Sit on a chair, sit on the leash (you could tie it to the chair), and then ignore the dog. If they relax I will pet and praise (no treats, because that often gets them excited again). I don't tell them to sit or down, I just let them figure out that we're going to be sitting here for a while so they might as well relax. They mostly grow out of it, but this helps in the mean time.
 

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I'm really interested in trying this exercise, but my biggest problem is how to prevent the unwanted behaviors that inevitably will pop up, such as chewing on literally anything she can reach, including the leash. Any suggestion how I could try this exercise while managing these other behaviors? If not, any suggestion how I could work toward eliminating these behaviors?
I keep looking at this from a "training a puppy" angle, but as my fiance has been pointing out, she's cognitively beyond puppy, and so some of the tricks for training bad habits out of puppies, she's not gullible enough for.
 

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The whole idea of the exercise is that you ignore most of the bad stuff and let them figure it out. I do tell them to leave the leash or remove it from their mouth. A chain leash or something not fun to chew might work too. But otherwise, the dog shouldn't be able to reach anything to chew if you're sitting in a chair with the leash short.
 

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And she's not a baby puppy, but IME she is just at the right age for the behavior she's exhibiting. That's what a lot of adolescents are like and the fact that's she's new to your house is making it 100x harder. It will get better!
 
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Thanks for the encouragement. I know that the behaviors are age appropriate and especially to be expected given the newness of the situation. What I'm coming to realize about the age, though has more to do with how smart she is, and how gullible she isn't, so some of the puppy training videos I've watched show methods that won't work for her.
 

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Hey guys!

So I need some input/suggestions.

I just got a dog about 2 weeks ago. He's a 1 year old Plott Hound/shepherd mix. Very sweet, very loving. TONS of curious energy! He's not bad about being hyper (he'll get the occasional zoomies but they usually only last for about 5-10 minutes) but what he will do is get himself into EVERYTHING! He just has this impulse to chew/lick/smell everything that is within mouth reach (...and sometimes OUT of mouth reach :p )

I work from home so during the day I am usually in the kitchen with him (with baby gates up to keep him in). This is where we "crate" him as well because there's really nothing in there for him to get into. So during the day when I'm working, he's usually pretty calm and will just lay on his bed and play with his toys and be a perfect angel.

But then at night, when I want to go into the living room and just relax and read a book or watch TV or something, it's a whole other story. I'll put up a baby gate to keep him in the living room with me so I can supervise him - but then I feel like that is ALL I am doing. I cant really relax and just settle back and read or watch TV because I feel like I have to watch him like a hawk. Because he will just go around the room, trying to lick and chew and sniff at everything. I realize he's just being a curious puppy and exploring but I am mentally EXHAUSTED since I feel like I can't truly just unwind and rest in my own home.

What should I do...?

(btw - I know the first answer is always "EXERCISE!!!!" We actually do quite abit of that. We take him on 4 20 minute walks a day - 7:00, 12:00, 5:00 & 10:00. During the 5:00 & 10:00 walk time he also gets to go out to our local basketball court and play fetch for about half an hour as well to run off some energy. But even doing that, he's still just so curious whenever he's in the living room and it takes quite awhile for him to finally settle down in his bed or on the couch with me.)
Mine is almost 11 months and she is crated for "downtime" and naps or plays with her hard chewers type toys so we can do what we need to do. I've had her on a strict "puppy" schedule since we first got her because she cannot settle on her own. Maybe after the 5pm walk, crate him for downtime so you can chill for a bit, and let him out once your done :) Movie time on out weekend doesn't happen till after her evening walk or playtime. Then she's crated for the time we watch it and usually naps or plays. Then she comes out again to play. If I didn't do this, Lucy would just run around or pace constantly or start chewing on everything. She gets lots of playtime and walks too.
 

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Thanks for the encouragement. I know that the behaviors are age appropriate and especially to be expected given the newness of the situation. What I'm coming to realize about the age, though has more to do with how smart she is, and how gullible she isn't, so some of the puppy training videos I've watched show methods that won't work for her.
lol yep, I've had three dogs and Lucy is the smartest and least gullible so she is always testing me. My husband and I always joke because you can see her gears working like "What can I do to get mom and dad going?" :ponder:
 
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