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Discussion Starter #1
George has a bite wound in his ear. well two actually although the second is more of a scrape.
We dont have dog parks as such here just places where dogs are allowed off lead but we have to share with on lead dogs, joggers and cyclists so its important for your dog to be well trained and social.
George has social under his belt and is very good natured but well trained is another matter, hes been with us since last April and before than he spent most of his 18months on a long line in someones back garden barking his head off at whoever passed the house to get attention and just doing what he wanted.. That plus his in built prey drive means we keep him on lead.

This is where the antisocial part comes in. Other dogs seem to see him as an easy target for humping..
Last week he greeted two large musterlanders, one was fine the other stalked round him and sensing what was coming I tried to move him on but the dog caught on and pounced.. Hump hump hump... George snarled and tried to get the other dog off.. It had no collar so I couldnt grab it and its owners had carried on walking as if nothing was going on.. George struggled , barked and snapped and at this point for daring to say no to this unwanted attention the other dog bit him in the ear!

I thought for one moment it was going to escalate but help came in the shape of Elmo who flew in like a large black angel barking and growling and saw off the other dog (Elmo is a rather large Rottie)

Now I've heard all excuses, its because your dog is castrated, its because he smells funny, its because hes submissive, its because hes on a leash...Notice how all of this blames the victim?

Recently my physiotherapist mentioned how distressed her elderly mother had become while out walking in nearby woods. An unknown dog (no owner in sight) came along and at first followed her but then started putting its nose up her skirt and progressed to jumping up at her the poor lady was terrified and almost hysterical by the time she got home..

In the old days when women got raped a common defense was to say she was asking for it, she wore a short skirt , she was out at night alone, she had had a drink and worst of all she accepted a drink from her then attacker.. We have learned that this attitude is totally wrong and yet when it comes to our dogs humping, jumping or bullying it still seems ok to blame the victim.

Why is this? Why can we not understand that as owners we have a duty not only to our own dog and their care but to ensure that our dogs are not a cause of distress or fear to other dogs and /or people? Its not something you cant help and its not the victims fault, its just plain antisocial..

If anyone else has this problem Id love to hear how you deal with it .
 

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This is why I think dog etiquette should be taught in schools - rule no. 1 is not to let your dog approach another dog if it's on lead.

I've been on the other side a few times - in his younger days my dog developed a hatred of unneutered male dogs, regardless of size and personality, and on one occasion he went for an old infirm dog I would have laid money on him ignoring. NOT the other dog's fault, my fault, my responsibility (though of course we're all caught out on occasion), and if I got yelled at... fair enough. To walk on and ignore what's happening is inexcusable because being bounced on by a larger dog, even if that dog is being friendly, can have a long-term effect on another, possibly less confident dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ive had dogs in all shapes and sizes and all the males have ended up being castrated either before we got them or in two cases after we got them for medical reasons ..Ive never had this problem with any of them getting humped. One dog developed very late on and decided to hump absolutely everything and so we did have him done which solve the problem and just put him back to his normal old self.

I just think the etiquitte or not being a pest hasnt yet sunken into people insofar that its not just them this extends to but also their dog or their children. Yes I also rant at people who ignore their screaming antisocial children in public.
 

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That's awful, poor George. Of course it's unacceptable, I'd have had a word to say to the owners when I found them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Since this happened Ive seen such a change in George, his ear has healed really well theres now just a little scab covering the bite wound but his attitude has changed a lot.

George has always been social (in fact a bit too social) he wants to just greet every person/dog he sees.. his interaction was always via a fence because his previous owners kept him in the garden on a long line so he got used to running to the fence and barking to get attention. We have been training him that he may only greet other people and dogs if they want to and if he does not bark, as soon as he barks we move away and that been going well.


Since this bite as soon as he spots another dog even ones he knows well his tail drops , his body couches slightly and he is on the defensive. He is ready for a fight, I can see it and Im darn sure other dogs can see it.
So far its all been ok. We greet other dogs very cheerfully and keep meetings very brief and light with rewards for good behavour. But this isthe result of stupid people who do not take responsibilty for their dogs in public spaces. I've now got to teach George that greeting another dogs isnt always going to result in an attack, yet more training heaped on my plate and all because some people let their dogs run wild.
 
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