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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my new dog arrived last. Wow, is he ever sweet. He does a cute thing (maybe trained) -sit up and beg sort of, paws off jumping up (I love it), and also paws on me jumping up (I don't mind, but we want him to join us visiting nursing homes someday hopefully sooner rather than later).
Here's the question: can I have the behaviour when I want it (on cue, by invitation) without encouraging spontaneous offers of the behaviour towards visitors, strangers and nursing home residents? Am I asking too much? I love the jumping up, and want to train freestyle eventually, but pawing at seniors, not so much.
And I know how to extinguish the jumping up, but he is an affectionate dog, so even 'extinction' (ie. ignore the behaviour, wait for him to offer something else, then reward (or click and treat)) may inhibit him in future trick training, or maybe I'm overthinking this....
& if this needs to be whooshed into the dog sport section, go ahead. It's more about him being a future freestyle dog while teaching basic manners. He is, actually, amazingly well behaved thus far.
 

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Sure!
Put jumping on cue and get stimulus control. It's actually the route I've gone with my sports guys as there are plenty of times I actually want jumping and paws up on me... for various tricks, as a reward/play... so don't want to extinguish or punish.
It's not something the average person likely has the skill or knowledge to train, but I think you'll be able to. :)

Here's a video that shows the process.

I'm not sure if she has videos up but I was in a workshop session on Stim Control with Hannah Branigan over the summer. She had a nice, clear process. Worth digging around on the net for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I'll check the video when I get home (or tomorrow).
Then I'll decide how much to throw at him (or how much I can handle). I am very sleepy, not much sleep last night due to having him arrive after my bedtime.
My husband (who is home with him) reports he is very sleepy too (dog and husband), I'll bet both are having a 'bonding nap' together.
I looked at pics of him taken last night, and he has tail slung low, so building confidence or reassurance is job one. And rest.
Anyway, thanks for info and for compliments. Wasn't sure if I was asking for the moon or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great video. Check it out. Sonic (yep, he's got a name) and I are having a bonding day. Turns out 1st job is finding a treat he likes. So far, cheese only (and kinda dried liver). I think he's having new dog butterflies.
2nd. I received some pics of him with his foster, and and relay people. He gives hugs, and they are welcome, and I like them too.
I think I'm not getting the fact that I no longer own a dog that looks like it could eat your grandmother (Dynamo was a mostly black gsd, possible american working lines). For Dynamo I taught 'let's dance' after the fact. For Sonic, I think I will keep the jumping, but as I train, he will learn alternate 'cute' attention behaviours.
 
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Just remembered... you're planning on training mostly in freestyle with your little guy right? You'll probably want your default position for training purposes to be a stand. That has helped tackle unwanted jumping.

And like you've decided, asking for alternate behaviors def manages/prevents jumping. :)
 

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I was told that dogs understand rules not exceptions to rules. So if the rule is you can jump up on command, but not when not given command or invited; that will work. It can't be the dog can jump up when I am in "junk" clothes but not when i have on "work" clothes; that won't work as a dog has no idea what is or isn't "work" clothes.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cool. I really like the jumping anyway.
And yes, I want to do freestyle, not to compete because of the money, and maybe not even with music, just something that's flashy fun and active. Imagine one day putting on a little show for the seniors, wouldn't that fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update!!!
Thanks @kmes & @TruckersMom
we have a dog that gives hugs on invitation, and keeps four on the floor with others. It was not easy, and not perfect and I would not want to try this with a busy household. I had the hardest time trying to get my husband to follow the rules, he just could not get it, so there was much inconsistency (he tried, but I think hugs come from an emotional place, so the application of logic just could not enter), but yes, we have a polite doggy at the nursing home, and can still invite him up for enthusiastic squishy hugs at home.
 
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I will preface this by saying I am not an expert trainer, nor is my dog super smart, so pretty much anyone should be able to train like this.

We trained our dog not to jump up at people... ever.

Then we trained her to jump up on command. She totally gets it, each time I issue the command to jump, she jumps up once to the place I indicate.

However in her teenage jerkness she started jumping up on our doggy daycare person (who is the most exciting person in the world to her). So we decided to experiment with not correcting (as she likes dogs jumping up at her!), but correcting if she tried to jump at anyone else. So far it has worked fine, she jumps up at this one person only and never at anyone else! She has tried to jump at me once uncommanded (a couple of months ago) I turned around and ignored her till she sat, and she hasn't tried it again.

So I think dogs can understand simple exceptions to rules, as long as they understand the basic rule very well.
 
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