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We have a 15 week old Catahoula Mix. We got him when he was 11 weeks old. It has been a relatively easy first few weeks with him (when taking into account normal crazy puppy energy). He's good about the kennel, no accidents in it, a couple accidents in the house (our fault), going out once in the middle of the night, and can sit and wait patiently for a short time (before meals, treats, etc.). He's a smart pup.

I know puppies have energy to spare, and we've been getting him out everyday running around outside, walks around the yard (since he's not fully vaccinated), doing some training, meals out of puzzle toys (although he seems to lose interest in these fairly quickly now), lots of chew toys, etc.

The one main problem we have with him is the nipping and clothes pulling. He always wants to grab my clothes and tug, bite at my hands, jump up on me, etc. Even if I have a toy for him to chew on, he bypasses it to go for my hands/clothes. I literally try to stuff his mouth before he can get to me, but it often doesn't work. I've tied yelping, ouch, no in a stern voice...all of it just excites him more. Most days, the second he gets out of the crate, and I'm around, that's what he goes for, even if it's just after a nap. Now, if I have treats and he knows it, he'll sit there as polite and calm as can be waiting for the treat, or if I'm in an area that he's not quite as comfortable in (kitchen, different part of yard, etc.) he doesn't do it.

When we are outside, if we're in the "play area", he can be a nightmare for me. Running circles around me, barking, coming in for nips, etc. We have a long toy, Frisbee, ball that I can play with with him, but sooner or later his attention gets diverted to me and that's it. I cannot stand and ignore him while he's doing it because he is getting skin when biting my clothes. He will not listen to sit or lay down, and I can't grab for him to make him do it. I'm trying to walk away and ignore him when he does this, but how do I get away outside since he will literally latch onto me when I move away?

How do I get him confined/tethered outside "without giving him attention" when I have to battle his sharp little teeth latching onto my hands?

When inside we have been tethering him and walk away (if we don't tether he just finds something else to do), and as soon as the leash goes on him, he lays down, puts his head down and quietly waits mostly without any fuss. But the second the leash comes off, he's right back to it. My husband tells him off and no and he'll listen, but not with me.

He rarely quiets down and settles on his own when outside of his kennel. It just seems like he's always "on". Always up and moving. Is that normal?? He seems so wound up all the time that I can't figure out if he's getting enough sleep, too much sleep/not enough exercise or what.

I know there's something that I'm not doing right in curbing this behavior, but I can't figure it out.

Thanks for any adivce
 

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Leave the leash on, or a 'drag line' (a leash without a loop). Play with him (as you are doing), end the game when he goes after you or your clothes -- with the leash on, you should be able to step on it, also, it sounds like the leash is already become an established signal for calm (kudo's for that).

Also, observe your husband's interactions, or even video tape yours and his--see if he is doing something differently in body language and voice from you.

Watch this video, especially observe his body language & voice when he is talking about dealing with puppies that bite. It's calm, matter of fact, confident, etc...

Michael Ellis on 'puppies that bite'

Sometimes attitude is everything.

Basically, all fun things must end, instantly, when he goes after you or clothes, crystal clear, and can start up again right quick when he does something you want.

Does he know a motivated 'sit'?
 

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Hello :)

Honestly, I could sit here and try to go over all the little things you could be doing to help your puppy and you understand each other better but in this situation I feel it would be best for you to read a book by a very well known trainer named Pat Miller. The book is called "The Power of Positive Dog Training" and it is an excellent tool to help you communicate better with your dog.

Another great book is "The Other End of The Leash" by Patricia McConnell. Trust meee, even if you don't like reading just try to get through at least one of them. It will help you so much.
 
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