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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 9 week old male pocket beagle. He seems to have an issue with 'spot' peeing. Meaning he will often while playing etc... will suddenly stop squat, and pee s puddle about the size of a dime. Then continue playing. After two, or three minutes he will do it again.

He is very capable of holding his bladder for his age. For example he will sleep 5 to 6 hours at night with no accidents. So the spotting is some what confusing. Plus it rather complicates training. I was wondering if any one here had any ideas on how to handle this issue?

He also has a second issue. He is very stuburn about defecating. He will pick a spot(not always the same spot) and will refuse to go any where else. As in he squats to poop, you move him and block access to the place. And he will hold it for 7 to 8 hours before he cedes. Due to this I have yet to get him to poop outside. Even if i'm out there withhim for several hours. He will use a pad for it. Especially when he first gets ul in the morning. I suspect the problem is the pad he uses is too close to where he plays. Since the spots he picks are normally low traffic, and far from play/eating areas.
 

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First off, he is a very, very young puppy so peeing really often when up a and awake is totally normal. (I always say a little boy puppy pees every 10 minutes when awake.) Think of him as equivalent to a human infant. If you have any experience changing diapers, you know that little baby boy can squirt you frequently!

That said, you may want to get him checked for a Urinary tract infection. Peeing really overly frequently, and tiny amounts are indeed symptoms of a UTI.

As far as the pooping issue, please try to avoid making a value judgement such as "he is stubborn." Understand that the puppy is only doing what his instincts tell him... that is he is not trying to defy you at all. He has no clue that is is "naughty" for him to poo in his chosen place. The thing is, puppies very quickly pattern to a place to go potty, which of course is the instinct we humans work WITH in house training. Unfortunately he has patterned to somewhere you don't like, so you are going to have to be patient, and perhaps clever, in order to get him to re-pattern to where you want him to go. I would suggest you take a soiled puppy pad to the location you want him to use. (overall, using pads tends to lead to this sort of confusion you are now encountering, which is why some of us just train to the outdoors first.)

Anyway, in conclusion.
1) Vet check for a UTI
2) Review the puppy house training instructions here. They are really good!
Remember, NEVER punish your puppy for pottying in the wrong place... he will only learn to fear you, but will not understand he is being punished for the location of his potty.
 

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First off, he is a very, very young puppy so peeing really often when up a and awake is totally normal. (I always say a little boy puppy pees every 10 minutes when awake.) Think of him as equivalent to a human infant. If you have any experience changing diapers, you know that little baby boy can squirt you frequently!

That said, you may want to get him checked for a Urinary tract infection. Peeing really overly frequently, and tiny amounts are indeed symptoms of a UTI.

As far as the pooping issue, please try to avoid making a value judgement such as "he is stubborn." Understand that the puppy is only doing what his instincts tell him... that is he is not trying to defy you at all. He has no clue that is is "naughty" for him to poo in his chosen place. The thing is, puppies very quickly pattern to a place to go potty, which of course is the instinct we humans work WITH in house training. Unfortunately he has patterned to somewhere you don't like, so you are going to have to be patient, and perhaps clever, in order to get him to re-pattern to where you want him to go. I would suggest you take a soiled puppy pad to the location you want him to use. (overall, using pads tends to lead to this sort of confusion you are now encountering, which is why some of us just train to the outdoors first.)

Anyway, in conclusion.
1) Vet check for a UTI
2) Review the puppy house training instructions here. They are really good!
Remember, NEVER punish your puppy for pottying in the wrong place... he will only learn to fear you, but will not understand he is being punished for the location of his potty.
100% all of that!!!! :)

Seriously, he is very much a baby. A super young baby! Most puppies aren't reliably housetrained until 5-7 months (and even then an occasional oops can happen).

I absolutely agree to check for a UTI (probably a free-catch sample is just fine as there aren't really any major signs of an issue). Just catch some in a tupperware and bring it to the vet for an analysis and culture.

But holy cow do puppies pee a lot! They really do!

You say it happens often when he's playing. Puppies can usually hold it for a bit longer when they're inactive (e.g., crated, chewing on toy, or sleeping). When they're running around, it's like water goes in one end and out the other in the blink of an eye. The more hyper Ellie was, the more often I'd take her out. If not, she'd usually stop mid-run and pee. I learned quickly to take her out more often when she was active. I vividly remember once being annoyed at myself, because I noticed she was getting her evening "zoomies" while playing with my kids, and I was busy doing something so didn't stop to take her out. Sure enough, she peed. Totally my fault. ;)

I took Ellie out about every 1/2 hour at that age. Also, sometimes puppies don't fully empty their bladder the first time they go. The are just too easily distracted. After your puppy pees, try walking him around for another 10-15 minutes to see if he'll pee again.

Definitely, absolutely take Tess' advice. Make housetraining a positive experience (lots of treats for successes, no punishments for accidents). Provide constant supervision (crating when you can't watch him, or keeping him leashed to you). Sometimes it seems like your puppy will never get there, but with the right approach, all this difficult stuff will be a distant memory! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have been keeping it positive for the pup. After all I have trained a few dogs at this point. And I do know to not scold etc... puppies respond much better to positive reenforcement, than to negative deterrent.

I just never had one that would suddenly squat and pee so little all of a sudden before. I guess that is likely because I mostly handled females before. And the few males I actually had, were fully pad trained by this point. I do remember that with that last litter by now I was changing their pads 3 times a day. So makes sense that they do pee quiet a lot. Also yes he spots while "F.r.a.p'ing" (Zoomies) more often then any other time.

His training is going fairly well at this point. I finally got him to like the outdoors despite the fact that it's freezing out. Which has made getting him to do his duty outside far easier. In fact he is taking to far better then he ever did pad training. Personally I always found out door training a bit easier to do the pad training anyway.

He will poop outside now. before, if had "chosen" a spot (Ie already started to squat there) he would refuse to go any other spot. He held it as long as 7 hours before giving up and going somewhere else. Since he now likes to go out, there have been no pooping issues. Primarily because he gets praise for pooping outside instead of being interrupted, and hauled somewhere else.

Luckily the only place he has shown stubbornness was pooping places. He takes correction very well. Since my niece, and nephew started playing with him I started to have to train him to not be so "puppy nippy" It only took 3 or 4 days to get him to play well and chew toys, not fingers. If only it were so easy for fuzzy slippers.

This is the first puppy I have crate trained. But so far he seems to have taken to it well. He likes his crate. So far he has never been locked in longer then 30 minutes, since I am being overly cautious with a method I never tried before. But he has yet to even whine while crated. Which I find odd since he whines if I walk away even for a very short period when he is alone in his "play pen" area. I suspect it's that he doesn't mind being confined nearly as much as he fears being alone.(Very normal puppy behavior)

He knows his name well(He stops, and stares at anyone who uses it). He understands "No", the hardest part with no was getting OTHER PEOPLE in the house hold to say it firmly without shouting. With the children in the house I had to get them to use the command "Stop" instead of "No" because they did not use it consistently, or for the same reasons. The pup luckily was smart enough to figure out that different people wanted him to "Stop" doing different things. While others were ok with it. He also understands "Gimmie" to let go of toy. And interestedly seems to naturally walk beside me while I have done loose leash training with him.
 
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