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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all! We have an 8-week old Goldendoodle (walter) and have had him only about 4 days. I have millions of questions, which I will post in other threads, but one thing that I think will help a lot of other things is being able to get walter on a leash. However, whenever I put it on, he just chews it, even just plops down and chews away, if I try to take it out of mouth, thinks I'm playing and chews harder. Any tips??
 

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Hi and welcome to dog forum. Can we have some pics, please?? :)

You guy is just a baby; he doesn't know much about the world, but he does know he likes to chew. And look ... someone kindly has put a chewy thing right next to his teeth! How wonderful is that? But you don't want him chewing the leash, understandably, so you need to do two things: first, have a special something available that he can chew on and/or treats, and second, try to avoid giving him the chance to chew the leash in the first place.

First, encourage him to follow you without the leash, around your house or yard. Move quickly, and be enthusiastic. When you figure out what makes him want to follow, put his leash on and do the same thing. Repeat a lot. At least 100 times. :)

If he does take the leash in his mouth, immediately offer him something better -
Instead of trying to take the leash out of his mouth, offer him something even better, such as his special chewing toy or a treat. When he drops the leash to grab the better thing, praise and encourage him to follow you, exactly as you did when he was offleash. Again, repeat a lot ... 100 or even 200 times. :)

The combination of distraction with 'allowed' things, and the moving with you and he'll eventually figure out that leash chewing isn't wanted. Be patient, though; I'm not really kidding when I say you may need to repeat these lessons hundreds of times. Dogs learn quicker as they mature, but as babies they're still learning the (human) language, the (human) culture, they have the attention span of a gnat and no impulse control. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much! I have been trying the distraction thing with treats and it works well, he'll drop the leash immediately. But then he'll just sit there (nicely!) and wait for another treat haha, he won't walk. However, I'll keep trying and follow your advice of hundreds of times! Do you recommend only training one thing at a time? For example, if we're working on the leash thing this week, not to try to teach "Leave it" or "Drop it", etc. this week as well? I just don't want to confuse the little guy, but also want him to learn. Thanks again for your help! I'm so glad to have found this forum....
 

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But then he'll just sit there (nicely!) and wait for another treat haha, he won't walk. However, I'll keep trying and follow your advice of hundreds of times!
What a smart little guy! :) Well, you can use the next treat to 'lure' him a few steps to get him to walk. Or drag something he can chase, or maybe roll a ball along the floor/ground, so that he's inspired to chase it. I'm pretty sure that at this age you don't really want him heeling, you just want him to get the idea that when he's leashed, he's moving and not biting the leash.

Do you recommend only training one thing at a time? For example, if we're working on the leash thing this week, not to try to teach "Leave it" or "Drop it", etc. this week as well? I just don't want to confuse the little guy, but also want him to learn. Thanks again for your help! I'm so glad to have found this forum....
People have different opinions on this, but I think puppies are smart enough to learn several things over the same time period - it IS what they are doing, every day all day, after all. What I would say is that you should keep training sessions short, under five minutes, and only focus on one thing per training session. Five 3-minute sessions per day are better than one 15-minute session, more fun for you and more fun for the dog.

Have you looked into clicker training? If you haven't, google Karen Pryor and clicker training. It might be a great fit for you and your dog.
 
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