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Eating off the table has always been an issue with Cosmo. I have tried just about everything, but now I've decided to go for a more human child approach? When he tries to eat off of a plate on the table I'll make leave the living room and sit by himself in the dining room for 5 minutes. I've just started it recently but I was wondering if it has worked for anyone else? Any different things I may not have tried?

I don't want to use his crate as punishment as he's just started getting comfortable with it.
 

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I've used it and it's effective. They don't like being left out of everything so it's a good correction. Not every dog is smart enough to correlate the time out with the offense, but most are.
 

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I've used it and it's effective. They don't like being left out of everything so it's a good correction. Not every dog is smart enough to correlate the time out with the offense, but most are.
He certainly doesn't like being left out either. He's actually barked from his lying position at me telling me to let him get up haha, he's ridiculously smart but also obedient so he has to counter that with yelling at me like a crying child from his timeout spot. I don't let him out of timeout when he does that until he's quiet though. As funny as it is to me.
 

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It depends on the dog and the behavior. Eating people good might be reinforcing enough that it makes the punishment worth it to him. Or he might hate being alone enough that he decides it's not worth it.

With Delilah timeout works for barking- it calms her down if nothing else.
 

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Right... I don't know if it's functioning as a correction exactly, but "time out" in a crate helps to calm my dog down when he's barking or begging. He doesn't like it initially but he settles.
 

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Personally...

In most cases I don't think timeouts are actually effective as punishment/corrections with dogs.

''Effective'' punishment should suppress or stop a behavior after 2-3 times (talking textbook definitions here). If timeouts were effective, we wouldn't need to give them over and over for the same problem behavior.

Also consequences (both rewards and punishers) need to be immediate, and if not then a conditioned marker is needed to bridge that gap in time between the behavior and the consequence.

Most of the time with timeouts the consequence isn't immediate. People call the dog, grab collars, lead them out of the room, etc. so well over the max 2-3 second window.

At best, like already said it gives the dog a couple minutes to calm down and come back better able to cope/think/learn in that situation (important that you do take the time to work with the dog to show and reward the correct behavior after a timeout). And that ime happens generally only if the dog doesn't find the timeout and how they got there aversive.

If the dog dislikes the timeout, then ime then they are likely to be making the connection with things the person does and asks for to get the dog into a timeout. Stuff like the dog's name, recall, collar grabs, being lead by collar, etc. I suppose when these things become aversive they could potentially punish the problem behavior or eventually even serve as a marker of sorts... but now I'm rambling and probably heading ot!:p

Anyway, if I need to repeatedly give a timeout (fwiw I see timeouts more as interrupting a behavior and send my dogs to their places to settle. We often play the Jolly Settle game so it's not something they mind and can typically send them with a verbal "go settle'' and hand motion to their place), it tells me I'm not managing well enough and probably haven't taught my dogs what to do in that situation. So I decide if it's something I want to just manage or if it's something I want to train and then come up with a plan. ;)

Problem behaviors tend to be most easily handled ime by managing/supervising so as to keep it from happening repeatedly and also training the dog (rewards based methods) what to do in that situation. So when it comes to stealing food (reward = repeat; each time he is able to steal it just reinforces him and makes it more likely in the future), I normally suggest to people that they teach their dogs to settle on a bed or mat and provide the dog with their own dinner in a stuffed kong. Could also crate with the kong or also feed from another food toy in a different room blocked by a gate or ex-pen, then let the dog out once dinner is cleaned up. Impulse control exercises overtime also really help. :)
 

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I've used it with my dog and it worked very effectively, far better than anything else. In my opinion it's very similar to the "shunning" type of behavior a mother, littermates, or other dogs will do to a dog that is doing something obnoxious.

However, I do think that it depends in part on the dog's personality and in some cases how well they were originally socialized with their littermates and/or a dog pack. My pup is/was extremely orientated towards me and spent the first 12 weeks of his life with his mother/litter as well as an extended pack of 5 other dogs. He came to me very well versed in dog language, so it was very easy to use it to train him.

I rarely if ever grabbed him or dragged him with a leash/collar to his timeout spot. It was either me just turning away and ignoring him or giving him a stern "GIT" or telling him to got lay down with a pointed finger telling him where to sit down. Again, he was very orientated towards me at all times, we spent the majority of the day together. We still do actually, he is right behind me right now while I'm at work.

Teaching him to "out of the kitchen" and "quit begging" can be effective as well. In your case I think you need to teach him that the table area is out of bounds, depending on your space a line of tape on the ground might help him with the boundary.
 

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Eating off the table has always been an issue with Cosmo. I have tried just about everything, but now I've decided to go for a more human child approach? When he tries to eat off of a plate on the table I'll make leave the living room and sit by himself in the dining room for 5 minutes. I've just started it recently but I was wondering if it has worked for anyone else? Any different things I may not have tried?

I don't want to use his crate as punishment as he's just started getting comfortable with it.
Have you tried this?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZCIeEUm_n8
I personally don't think time outs work because dogs can't identify the moment that got them into the time out. He may think he is being punished for something other than the food.
 

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I've talked about this before. I think timeouts aren't effective at all for much the same reasons as kmes.

Effective punishment needs to be very very simple and easily associated with the undesired behavior. Timeouts are complicated and not immediate which makes them ineffective.
 

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Next time he goes to grab something off the table make sure its a habanero. That's will be a lot more effective than a time out and you won't even have to do anything. He'll learn all by himself.

Or he'll learn never to eat something that smells like that which is a lesson he should learn sooner or later.
 

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We've been having some success with time outs. One thing that I think has helped and made a difference is a shorter time out (about 1 min). The lady we did puppy class with (and now take Roscoe to her daycare once a week) recommended the shorter time outs to me. She pointed out that the shorter time outs help them associate specific behaviors with time out since their memory/attention spans aren't so long. We were doing longer timeouts (maybe 5 minutes), which didn't seem to be working effectively. Now, the only time we do a longer time out is when we actually want Roscoe to settle down, as he sometimes gets overly excited when he's playing. His time out is in his playpen and we don't treat it as a punishment, so he actually never fusses about being in there (unless he's in there while we're eating).
 
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