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When I got Delilah she was skin and bones. Weighed 5.4 lbs. Now she weighs 6.6. But everyone is always telling me she's too thin. My parents just told me that I'm "starving her" in a not joking way tonight. I think she's fine, and my agility trainer told me she looks great. My vet hasn't told me she's too thin. But I'm so freaking sick of my parents criticizing every single thing I do with her. Does she really look too thin?

The day I got her- her spine, ribs, and hip bones really stuck out.



Now:





Sorry those last ones aren't the best. I don't have any better pics atm. I can add more tomorrow maybe.
 

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Heck no! She looks great. Well muscled and lean is good especially for Agility(and their joints)!!!!
You can worry about weight when she gets older, and her metabolism slows down and keeping the lbs off, is hard Hahaha!!!
 

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Those types of terriers are just built very lean, so they're going to look skinnier than other breeds when they're a good weight. She looks healthy and in great shape to me. My JRT mix is very lean and slim, and people often tell me she's too skinny. I just ignore it.
 

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In the photos I can see the vertebrae and ribs, are they visible when she is standing normally? If you can that would suggest to me that she is on the thin side of healthy. Individuals starved at critical periods (you mentioned she was skin and bones) in infancy can have trouble putting on weight. I would add a little extra food or treat daily.

I find it interesting that in humans being underweight is as predictive of morbidity (bad health) as being obese. Being an overweight person over 50 actually lowers the risk of death but not incidence of things like the flu and heart attacks, it increases the risk of arthritis though. Poor levels of exercise is a better predictor for ill health and symptomatic arthritis than weight. Yet I find that health professionals invariably place greater importance on weight that exercise.
 

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I went through the same thing with my boyfriend's parents and Bandit. Bandit has the same lean body type and when they found out I was feeding RAW they thought it was starving him and he was underweight. Trust your vet, and if your parents continue to push the issue I would have them talk to your vet about it so he can assure them that her weight is fine.
 

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In the photos I can see the vertebrae and ribs, are they visible when she is standing normally? If you can that would suggest to me that she is on the thin side of healthy. Individuals starved at critical periods (you mentioned she was skin and bones) in infancy can have trouble putting on weight. I would add a little extra food or treat daily.

I find it interesting that in humans being underweight is as predictive of morbidity (bad health) as being obese. Being an overweight person over 50 actually lowers the risk of death but not incidence of things like the flu and heart attacks, it increases the risk of arthritis though. Poor levels of exercise is a better predictor for ill health and symptomatic arthritis than weight. Yet I find that health professionals invariably place greater importance on weight that exercise.
The first picture where you can see her spine is the day I first got her. You could see pretty much all of her bones.

Now I only see her ribs. Sometimes if she's bending you can see the spine at the bend because her back is curved and not straight. Like in the first picture, that's not her hunched over, her back is actually like that :/ It looks better now that she's matured a little and put on some weight, but in certain positions you can still see the curve.
 

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If you are doing agility, or another dog sport, with her then she's at a perfect weight and I'd do my best to not let her gain anymore. If she's not doing any dog sports and gains a few more ounces it's no big deal, but I'd still not let her gain much more then a few ounces.

Let your parents know all the health problems that being slightly overweight can cause a dog, and that with toy dogs just a couple pounds make a HUGE difference. My boy is now 9.8lbs and is doing great, but back when he was at 11.8 lbs he was having trouble with his back, his anal glands were constantly causing him trouble, his knees bothered him more, and he was downright lazy. At 11.8lbs he was a bit chubby but still not really obese. Now with only 2 lbs gone he's not had back issues in months, his anal glands are no longer causing him trouble, I notice no problems with his knees, and he's full of energy.
 

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Part of the reason people might think he is too thin is because he has a really short coat, so everything is easier to see. If he had 1-2 inch flowing coat of fluff, no one would be able to see without feeling the ribs. Personally don't think he's too thin anymore either.
 
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