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Sorry for the frequent posting! I have a miniature american shepherd, their average weight ranges between 20-40 pounds. My girl's a week over six months and 25 pounds.

I know that dog obesity is extremely common, particularly in the U.S, I read an article and now i'm feeling a bit stressed :/

It's harder to tell with her because of that thick fur, I just need a few honest opinions. Thanks!
 

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She's pet weight, that's fine. There's a waist. I wouldn't allow her to put on any more.

Are you aware that puppies need less food as they mature? Keep an eye on what the packaging says. Also Puppies go through stages of pudgy and thin so if you change things do it slowly.
 

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She looks fine to me. As stated don't let her gain more. Puppies go through weird stages where they are chubby to really thin. Just watch how much food you feed her and she should be fine. Pet weight is okay.

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Get her wet. Seriously. When it comes to weight on my Aussie I find it the easiest to see when he is wet. I actually get people saying how beautiful he is, and then once he gets out of the water, people berate me for how skinny he is.

I like to feel my dog's ribs with minimal pressure, and I like seeing a good tuck.

My vet always says that if well-meaning strangers come up to you and tell you your dog is too thin, it means he's perfect. ;)
 

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She could be more "fit" - but she's not yet F-A-T.

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If U want something to worry over, her waist is a wee bit thickened. :D
U can work her core muscles by teaching her to sit-up pretty, squatting on her butt, with forepaws hanging at her chest; teach it with her spine in the angle of a corner for support to both sides of her body, so she can't fall & hit her head. The corner of a room, the angle where cupboards meet in the kitchen... anything that's taller than she is, while sitting upright.

FINGERS are best, for tracking wt -
each rib should be easily found, with a rounded front & a slat rear; U should be able to feel ribs readily, & between each rib & the next one is a slight dip, with muscle as a 'floor'.
Ribs should never stare outward - on smooth-coated dogs, the last 2 to 3 ribs should be slightly visible when the dog stands.
When the same dog sits, those visible ribs should no longer be obvious - there, but ya gotta look to find 'em.

SPINES are another good indicator -
on sighthounds, vertebrae in the loin are visible, but not glaringly obvious; no dog should ever have a dragon's spine of upstanding bony plates! Nor for that matter, should any horse.
The spine should be smooth & rounded to touch; U can find individual vertebra with slight pressure. // Muscle should fill the slot on each side of the spine's bony prominences - there should be no "shelf" below the spine.

The layback of the shoulder should be visible on a smooth-coated dog, & on a thickly-coated dog, it should be very-easily found with fingertips.

No matter what breed, the shoulders should always be the widest point of the body, seen from above; the butt is narrower, & the waist narrower-yet.


Signs a dog is too fat:
- significant pressure is needed to palpate the ribs; they're blanketed with fat.
- there's a fat-pad on the center of the chest.
- there's no waist seen from above; the dog's a cylinder from shoulders to butt.
- there's no tuck-up, seen from the side; the belly-line from the end of ribs to the visual cut-off at the thighs should slope uPward, not make a straight line... nor worse yet, slope Down. :eek:
- looking toward the head from the tail, the neck does not taper toward the head; it's a pipe.
- a vertical edge at the butt makes a U, following the rump forward; it looks like a quilt laid-over the dog's back, under the hair. That's a fat-blanket.

- terry

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