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Discussion Starter #1
He's jumpy and mouthy and won't come when called.

:(

I'm guessing he's 10 months old now. Ish.

Although he's completely ignored people when there are dogs around for weeks now, he jumped up at a woman holding some treats in the park today, with his mouth open, and she said I should muzzle him. :( Personally, I think she shouldn't have been holding smelly treats and giving them to all the dogs but I also think that if he's going to be jumpy around strangers he needs to be back on a lead until I've sorted it out, which means less social time with other dogs which means less exercise and socialisation which means more problems...

So, my questions are these:

Is this a normal 'teen thing'?

How long does this stage last?!

Can I start recall training again using a different way of calling him? I was thinking about an ordinary whistle (not a dog one.)
 

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What I've noticed with Kasper (who is very much a terrible teen ;) ) is that he goes through phases...

Like, for a while his recall was terrible and we had to work really hard with it. Then he went through a period of being terrified of traffic cones. Then he jumped up at every person he met (even if they didn't give him any attention and were just walking past). His latest thing is his play biting (which he has always done but which we had improved on) has gotten worse again...with each problem we just worked with it, overcame it, and moved on to the next :)

The adolescent stage varies; some dogs it doesn't last that long...Kasper's been a teenager going on for a year now :rolleyes: I think breed/s and size can play a part (smaller dogs seem to mature faster in general I think, whereas bigger dogs mature slower) and every dog is different and individual too.

When Kasper's going through a testing point we up his exercise, play, training and lots of praise for good behaviour.

*edit to add*

Not sure about recall training...we just started as if he was a pup, with lots of high value treats and uber praise, then upped the distance and distractions.

Red
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you!
He's trying my confidence a lot lately. He had an hour's walk with my husband this morning and when he got home he was loopy, so I took him straight back out again for another hour charging round with other dogs. He's out again now (at almost 4.30pm) with my husband for another long walk because my sons have their friends round and I don't want him jumping all over them. He's been great with the kids' friends but I'm just not happy with his behaviour this week.

That said, he was a gem last week when we took him to my in-laws for a holiday. Good as gold. So maybe the change in routine has been unsettling too. I didn't let him off the lead there though as I wasn't convinced he'd come back.
 

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Have you tried a better routine? Those walks sound great but generally he may not even need them, he may need more mental stimulation. I like to keep puppies in a strict routine until they're nearly 18 months old; even now I have two puppies here that are 11 weeks and they get put in their crate for two hour slots at a time when I think they've been playing/walked/etc enough and need a break. They really thrive and know what to expect, and it means we haven't experienced many problems yet; no chewing, no accidents, etc. Just a suggestion, maybe set times in his crate so that he's calmed down routinely can help?

10 months is really really young considering his size; he's still a babe really and soon he'll be as good as gold and you'll miss these naughty days. :)
 

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Thanks.

I can't manage routine - not for anything in my life. I have ADHD. I wish it was somethign I could achieve!

Today was exceptional as he was just completely hyper. He normally gets a couple of hours exercise and about an hour's training all in. I agree completely about the training vs exercise. The pup trainer said exactly the same thig and I nnoticed a distinct difference. (sorry. back pain making my typing fuzzy!)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Also, the dog has been a total gem with the boys' friends. They're 4 and 7 years old and they've both done some sit/wait training with him and given him some treats. He's asleep in his bed, untethered, while the boys are playing very noisily in the next room.

I have a strong suspicion that he has a bad day and I think everything's falling apart...I do tend to see every possible scenario with every event that happens, like a radio with every channel on.

Sorry about all this!"
 

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My dog was pretty much a 'teen' since i got him at 5 months! his original owners never taught him anything or gave him any boundaries and he was just SO hyper! i had questioned myself what i had gotten into :S

As hard as it is for you, routine is very important and it wasn't until i got into a real routine with my dog that he started to settle down. Also try to focus on mental stimulation as much as you can! My dog is 11 months old and he is getting a lot better and he is half german shepard so he is a big dog! it can last anything from a few months up to when he is about 2! :eek: just try to be patient with him and always remember that he will get better!!

With the recall, I use a whistle as i feel it works better when he is distracted. Every morning i take him to a local small park and focus purely on recall going back to the basics of getting his attention with the food and as he starts running i blow the whistle. Just like you are teaching it from scratch and this has helped! he still has the odd day where he runs off with other dogs, jumps on everyone and everything in site and i no longer exist!! But i just put a smile on my face and his lead! if anyone get the grump then he isn't my dog!! lol!!
 

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LOL Thanks. That helps.

I think you're both completely right about routine. I could give you a dozen examples of a perfect routine I could make for us right now. I also know that I can't do it.

It's an executive function issue. There is the knowledge (what I should do) and the ability to use the knowledge. I have the first but not the second.

I have lots of positive traits though! I just need to work out a way of compensating for the lack of routine, maybe?
 

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Lenny was pretty awful when he hit 6 months, and it certainly continued till he was a year or so (and it got slightly better as he got closer to one year).

Go back to treating him much like a puppy. For Lenny I went back to tethering and crating for breaks when I wanted to pull my hair out (he was given a king or similar toy of course, it wasn't a punishment but a break for us both). I increased the mental stimulation, and when possible did increase the physical exercise though that didn't seem as helpful as the mental stimulation. Clicker training saved my life lol (even though you don't have to clicker train, plenty of ways to train a dog as we all know) Restrict his freedoms until he has earned them back, set him up success in situations you think he can handle.

Remember: patience. If you can get past the 'terrible two' stage then everything else later on will be a breeze.

And I just want to say that Lenny doesn't have a very specific routine. I'm in college and my mom has a schedule that changes on a daily basis so between the two of us there are plenty of changes in the schedule. However, I find as long as the routine is fairly consistent then dogs do adjust.

Always when mom leaves for work he's put in my room with me after a potty break and breakfast (he'll usually curl up and sleep with me). Then later I'll get up and we'll either exercise or play before or after I have class depending on the day. When no one is home he has to be crated. When mom gets home he's let out and has some play time until I get back when we will either walk if we haven't and or train. So it changes and varies, but there are some staples. As long as you have one or two things that are consistent (even if it's just a basic order of day's events, ignoring times) then I think your pup will be fine. :) Dogs are very adjustable, do don't feel bad for not having a tight routine. It can be helpful (especially to young puppies or newly adopted dogs) but it isn't necessary for a dog to do well.
 

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my dog was VERY challenging as a puppy.. she's 2 now and is usually a gem. i had no idea what to do with her so i started taking her to our kennel for obedience classes, we did that for 7 months and it really helped build my confidence around her and it helped our bond i think, we both really enjoyed it.. anyways, with her recall i was taught to call her name and waive my arms over my head with my 2 directing fingers out, like i was directing an airplane and when she came she would have to sit and i would grab her collar and give her a treat then let her go or leash her up, but mostly let her go back right away.. over and over and over, everywhere we went and now i just have to call her name and raise my hand a little and she cant get to me fast enough, even though now she doesnt get treats nearly as often.. i found that she responds much better with hand gestures than verbals alone.. if that helps at all.. lol we had an amazing trainer that worked personally with us and we have a gesture for every command, sit, lay down, sit up (which for some reason teaching her to sit up opposed to sitting down was very hard but she mastered it) and it just seems like her focus is better when i use my hands as well as talking to her..

oh and my pup is over 2 and i still dont think she's out of her "puppy" phase, if she ever will be, we just know how to deal with it now.. usually.. lol
 

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I lived with someone who had ADHD so i can completely understand that having a routine and sticking to it every day would be impossible!!

Focus on the mental stimulation at least, make everything he does and gets a game for example give him his breakfast in a treat dispensing ball. If you allow him on the sofa make him do some tricks before you allow him up with you. On walks make him focus on you, lay down and wait while you take off the lead and then give the command to go play! There are also puzzle games and things you can buy off the internet which are quite good. just make everything fun! if your feeling stressed or had a bad day then you don't need to bother, there not rules just a bit of fun :)

Just little things like that to get his brain going and will always help with his training and obedience as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you everyone. That's all both useful and comforting!
 

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Routine is important, but I have mild ADD so I can understand why it doesn't work either! On the other hand I'm betting you have at least a basic routine whether you realize it or not (you have children, and a husband, and presumably at least one of you has a job, therefor you have a routine to some degree, even if you don't conciensly realize it).

Having multiple methods to recall wouldn't be bad, if for example your current recall method is to say come, then training him to a whistle TOO wouldn't be bad, just don't let the verbal command lapse.

Mental stimulation, games and toys (homemade or storebought) to make him work for his food ought to help with some of the problem.

And yes your dog could be going through a teen/terrible twos stage, just keep working on it and you'll all come out in the end!
 
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