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Hi, my 5 years old child is allergic to almost everything (dust mite level 5, house dust 5, cats 4, dogs 4, pollen 3). He is taking medicine to control his asthma. He haven't had asthma for 2 years. We had a dog until he was 3. He sometimes got a small bumps when he was licked by her but that was it.
Recently we visited a dog shelter and a breeder a few times. Most of time, he doesn't show any symptoms, but there were 2 occasions that he had hives and his eye got puffy and a few coughs and sneezing. I'm guessing that he cannot handle dogs who were not washed for a long time. We met a dog which we want to adopt (adult male). He was completely ok for 30 minutes greeting. After we met a female dog and spent a 5 minutes or so, he coughed once and sneezed once. And I saw a small bump on his face. He had a runny eye and hives on the way home. I like to think that the male dog was washed well so he was fine with that. I'm guessing we didn't have a plan to see the female dog so she wasn't prepared and not washed, and my child had allergic reaction to it. Another occasion, we greeted a terrier at a shelter, first visit was fine, second visits he showed symptoms.
We decided to go through trial period with the male griffon from end of June. I'm preparing for it. I bought a HEPA air purifier for each room. And a door way curtain for his bedroom besides a door. I covered all bookshelf and shelves plastic covers so that it will be easy to clean. (Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help a child and a dog live together?)
I know people recommend poodles as hypoallergenic dogs for allergic people. But I hardly hear about Brussels Griffon. I'm wondering why? My son don't like poodle so much. He wanted Shiba or Dackshund, but they shed a lot. We chose Brussels Griffon.
 

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The reason poodles are often suggested is because they don't shed - but that only helps if it is the hair that causes the reaction. Poodles still have dander and saliva, which cause reactions in some people.

So I'm afraid it really isn't guaranteed that your son won't have a reaction. Washing the dog regularly can keep the dander down though (but please do this mostly in plain water or you will strip the oils from the dog's coat).
 

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I hope this works out well for the dog.

Remember a dog is a living breathing creature and they have a right to a good life. If the only way your son will be able to cope with a dog is for you to constantly bath the dog ask yourself if that is the right thing to do for the dogs sake.

Although many dogs dont mind water or bathing. (I have one who will swim in anything deeper than a tea saucer) the constant shampooing and drying or fur can be really bad for them. How would you cope if your dog were to develop skin irritations from constant bathing?

You would need to see how your son reacts to this dog when it hasnt just been in the bath.

Also think of yourself and the burden you are putting on your household to constantly wash a dog.

To be perfectly honest if my child were this allergic I wouldnt consider a dog at all. It isnt fair to either of them.
 

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Hi, my 5 years old child is allergic to almost everything (dust mite level 5, house dust 5, cats 4, dogs 4, pollen 3). He is taking medicine to control his asthma. He haven't had asthma for 2 years. We had a dog until he was 3. He sometimes got a small bumps when he was licked by her but that was it.
Recently we visited a dog shelter and a breeder a few times. Most of time, he doesn't show any symptoms, but there were 2 occasions that he had hives and his eye got puffy and a few coughs and sneezing. I'm guessing that he cannot handle dogs who were not washed for a long time. We met a dog which we want to adopt (adult male). He was completely ok for 30 minutes greeting. After we met a female dog and spent a 5 minutes or so, he coughed once and sneezed once. And I saw a small bump on his face. He had a runny eye and hives on the way home. I like to think that the male dog was washed well so he was fine with that. I'm guessing we didn't have a plan to see the female dog so she wasn't prepared and not washed, and my child had allergic reaction to it. Another occasion, we greeted a terrier at a shelter, first visit was fine, second visits he showed symptoms.
We decided to go through trial period with the male griffon from end of June. I'm preparing for it. I bought a HEPA air purifier for each room. And a door way curtain for his bedroom besides a door. I covered all bookshelf and shelves plastic covers so that it will be easy to clean. (Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help a child and a dog live together?)
I know people recommend poodles as hypoallergenic dogs for allergic people. But I hardly hear about Brussels Griffon. I'm wondering why? My son don't like poodle so much. He wanted Shiba or Dackshund, but they shed a lot. We chose Brussels Griffon.
Hi. Welcome to the forum. :)

I have loads of allergies.

Allergies are complicated and varied. A reaction can happen in minutes, or it can take days (up to 3-4 days post allergen contact). In addition, they can also develop over time and prolonged contact, so it's a bit simplistic to say "He reacted to this dog within 30 minutes, so we know he's allergic to her, but he didn't react to this one at all within 30 minutes, so he's fine with this dog."

You also need to know exactly what it is about dogs that he's allergic to. You're assuming it's dander, but he reacted to your previous dog's saliva when she licked him. ;)

For this reason, I would advise against getting a dog at all. I just cannot see it ending well. If you get a dog at all, a door curtain isn't going to be enough. You will have to have a full door, and preferably an "air lock" system of one door behind the other to stop the dog, the dog's fur/hair or dander from getting into his room. Given that hair, fur and dander can travel on clothing, that means a completely different set of clothes every time he goes from the family area of the house (with the dog) to his room - that's simply not realistic. In addition, as you'll know from his house mites allergy, the house will need to be vacuumed daily. That includes his bedroom.
 

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I agree with the above.....it is unwise for you to get a dog at all in these circumstances. Because y our son did not react in 30 minutes with one dog doesn't mean he wouldn't react very strongly if the dog were living in the same house with him! Trust me on this, I have experience with this issue.

Plus, please remember that a dog is not a piece of clothing or a toy that you can simply return if it doesn't work out right. A dog is a feeling creature who wants to bond with someone and have a home. to bring one in on a trial basis and then return it is not fair to the dog, nor is it fair to your son, who may become attached to the dog and then be upset if the dog needs to go.

And it is not good for a dog to be bathed all the time.

Now...........there's good news.

I have a family member who is allergic to dogs. could not possibly even go into a house that had had a dog or cat in residence, even if the animal was no longer there. But, when he became an adult the allergy because less of a problem and he now has a poodle and no problem whatever. This might be the case for your son.

for now, how about considering an easier pet for your son. A guinea pig? Hamster?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for replies. Probably we should not have a dog... When I visited poodle forum, I saw some dog allergy people who got poodles and managed to live with them (washing their dog once a week) It sounded like once they get a dog, they get used to their dogs allergen. I love dogs. I'm from Japan, you may think I may treat a dog as a toy. No I won't. We used to live in the US and we used to have a dog, we took her to every hotels and most of restaurants with us. We almost always ate outside even in winter time. We used to go to beaches and let her swam. Wonderful days... It's sad and hard to accept the reality that my child won't be able to have a connection with a dog which potentially can be a wonderful friend. To me dogs are the best, to be honest.....
 

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Thanks for replies. Probably we should not have a dog... When I visited poodle forum, I saw some dog allergy people who got poodles and managed to live with them (washing their dog once a week) It sounded like once they get a dog, they get used to their dogs allergen. I love dogs. I'm from Japan, you may think I may treat a dog as a toy. No I won't. We used to live in the US and we used to have a dog, we took her to every hotels and most of restaurants with us. We almost always ate outside even in winter time. We used to go to beaches and let her swam. Wonderful days... It's sad and hard to accept the reality that my child won't be able to have a connection with a dog which potentially can be a wonderful friend. To me dogs are the best, to be honest.....
Did not mean to imply that you would be a bad dog owner. Sorry if it seemed that way. I have observed that people in Japan are most often very good to their dogs.
And glad that you see that getting a dog now is not a good idea........

It is sad not to be able to have one. But, as I said, it's possible that he will be able to have one as an adult, if he chooses the right breed and his allergies get better. The family member I mentioned is very happy with his dog, and so is his young son. sometimes it just takes patience and the right timing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When he was a toddler, he had reaction but our doctor told us that the skin reaction is fine. At the time, we did skin test to see if he was allergic to dogs and the result was negative. Now, we often pet dogs, he is fine even when he gets licked by a few dogs. There were just 2 occasions he reacted badly.. If he always have some allergic symptoms when he contacts dogs, then it would have been easy to give up. But not...

My child had food allergy. He needed to eat the allergic food daily to cure it. I did it with a Stanford professor / allergy specialist. When I think about it, I thought there might be higher chance for him to adjust himself to dogs if we have a dog earlier.

I purchased 3 air purifier and a crate for the trial. It's not like buying a toy. I'm taking it very seriously.

Once I gave up the idea of having dogs. But after visited poodle forum I changed my opinion. What I've read was that you can find a dog you don't have allergic reaction but you need to be with the dog long time to see if the dog is the one. I thought teaching a dog not to lick him and always running purifiers may solve the problem. That's what it looked like when I visited poodle forum. But usually I like to have research based information to back me up, and I couldn't find any..
 

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So you have determined that the "trial" will need to be "a long time" in order to find out if your son can live with a dog.

Just curious.......how long is the long time? 6 months? A year?
And what will become of the dog if it doesn't work out?
And what will happen with you son if the dog has to leave and he has bonded with it?
 

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When he was a toddler, he had reaction but our doctor told us that the skin reaction is fine. At the time, we did skin test to see if he was allergic to dogs and the result was negative. Now, we often pet dogs, he is fine even when he gets licked by a few dogs. There were just 2 occasions he reacted badly.. If he always have some allergic symptoms when he contacts dogs, then it would have been easy to give up. But not...

My child had food allergy. He needed to eat the allergic food daily to cure it. I did it with a Stanford professor / allergy specialist. When I think about it, I thought there might be higher chance for him to adjust himself to dogs if we have a dog earlier.

I purchased 3 air purifier and a crate for the trial. It's not like buying a toy. I'm taking it very seriously.

Once I gave up the idea of having dogs. But after visited poodle forum I changed my opinion. What I've read was that you can find a dog you don't have allergic reaction but you need to be with the dog long time to see if the dog is the one. I thought teaching a dog not to lick him and always running purifiers may solve the problem. That's what it looked like when I visited poodle forum. But usually I like to have research based information to back me up, and I couldn't find any..
And adoption centres around the world have to pick up the pieces when Mum and Dad buy a dog, then realise that Junior is allergic and the dog is turned in to rescue. It must of the top 10 reasons dogs are handed in.

Not to mention the free ads.

It's one thing for an adult to decide to get a dog and handle their allergies, but frankly it's the height of irresponsibility to expect a child to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
We were thinking about adopting an adult dog from a breeder who no longer wants to keep the dog. The trial would be one week or so if we decide to do that.
 

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The thing with allergies is that something you've reacted to before can suddenly cause a reaction five, ten, twenty years later.

So what will you do if the week trial goes well and you adopt the dog and two or three years later your son has an extreme reaction to the dog? You MUST consider what is best for the dog above all else.
 

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The thing with allergies is that something you've reacted to before can suddenly cause a reaction five, ten, twenty years later.

So what will you do if the week trial goes well and you adopt the dog and two or three years later your son has an extreme reaction to the dog? You MUST consider what is best for the dog above all else.
Dog and child. But otherwise, yup.

@applejack, I wish my mum was a member of this site. I wish she could tell you of the heartache she felt - and still feels - at watching me suffer. The nights spent listening to me as I struggled to breathe, the times I scratched until I bled - and then kept going. The amount of times I cried because of the pain. The endless GP visits. The ambulances and the midnight rushes to hospital because of another asthma attack. The weeks of daily trips to the hospital to have bandages replaced. The coal tar applied to my body that made me scream.

She really did everything she could think of to stop me suffering. She switched me to goats milk, she changed her soap powder, she denied her son, my brother, of the request for a dog - which must have torn her up too, when he saw a dog and pined for one, but Mum and dad said No because of Linz's skin.

THAT's a responsible parent. She never did anything at all that she knew would exacerbate my conditions. She acted on the advice of the doctors. And I do know from experience how fruitless and frustrating it is when you do you very best and it still isn't good enough.

I was 20 when we got a dog. I was 20 because I was mature enough to take care of my own allergies. Because I shrugged and said "then don't let me stop you. I'll be moving out eventually and I'll manage my condition until then.". And because I stood by that conviction (and ended up taking the dog with me when I did move out).

You are thinking only of yourself. Not the dog, and certainly not your son.
 

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The problem with bringing in a dog for a week to test it out is that it doesn't really give you any idea if the dog will work out in the long term. A person can be fine for a few days, but the accumulation over time can still result in a bad allergic reaction weeks or months later.

And if it did, then what. As I said before.

No matter how you look at this, I agree with the above posts that it would not be right for you to bring in a dog to this situation. Let your son wait until he is an adult and then he can have a dog if he chooses to, and if he knows by then whether or not he can manage his allergies.

Seriously, why are you pushing forward with this when you already admitted that "probably [you] should not have a dog."
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I still like to do more research before I give up. 1.Obviously there are people who are allergic to dogs and manage to have a dog without any symptoms. It could be some sort of Russian roulette. But it could be about how clean your room is and which breed you have. 2. Do you know that the blood test class / level doesn't tell you your severity of allergic reaction. If the number is high, it means you are likely to have the allergy, even then you don't know if symptom is severe or not... At this moment, I'm not very sure what caused our child the allergic reaction. 3. If people are so worried about future allergic reaction, no one should own a dog. Because there is a higher chance you develop dog allergy if you live with them compare to people who don't have dogs.

I wonder if people here who say they suffered by dog allergy tried HEPA air purifier, weekly bathing, no upholstered furnitures, no carpets.
 

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. 3. If people are so worried about future allergic reaction, no one should own a dog. Because there is a higher chance you develop dog allergy if you live with them compare to people who don't have dogs.
I would be very interested to see the source of this information, and the peer-reviewed scientific studies that have indicated this is true, because I find it pretty doubtful.
Will you please cite your sources for this statement?
 

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I really don't understand your overwhelming desire to put your kid at risk of a severe reaction.

Per your first post, you had a dog up until your child was 3 years. He is now 5 years and has not had an asthma attack for the past two years. Hmmmm, think about that. When the dog was no longer there, your kid no longer had asthma attacks.

WHY in any logic would you think that bringing a dog into your home now is going to have a good outcome?

Your son is too young to for this. His allergies are extreme and there are too many of them that you cannot control for you to ignore the ones you can control. People outgrow allergies, they also develop allergies as adults. But a child of FIVE years old is too young to see such changes in allergies - his body and system have not had enough time learning how to handle these allergens.

If you bring a dog into your home, your child WILL have another asthma attack. This isn't an IF, it's a when. Do you really want to put him in that situation? If you think that is worth the risk, then you are a lousy parent.

At this point, your arguments to get a dog have been reasonably discussed and you have been told that your desire for a dog will be harmful to both child and dog. That appears to have gone right past you, so I have put it in terms that I hope you understand and you can see that this is a huge mistake.
 
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