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I saw this, and I'm wondering if this a good training tool to use for learning to walk on a leash? If I used this from the beginning, would it naturally re-enforce polite walking? My theory is that if I use this from 8 weeks on, when the dog is older it will just naturally know how to walk on the leash and then I wouldn't have to use it anymore. But if my logic is flawed PLEASE give insight!

Martha Stewart Pets® Training Head Collar | Collars | PetSmart

ETA: It would also be paired with lots of treats.
 

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IMHO: No this is a very bad idea. Head collars are not for puppies, they are a last resort for dogs, and even then, I would never use them. Head collars don't teach good LLW, they are a management tool.
 

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The way you sound like you want to use it, IMO it would be a mild aversive/ positive punishment. The head collar makes it super uncomfortable to pull. It sounds like your thought is it will help cement to the puppy that not pulling is good because it gets you treats as well as means the thing on your face doesn't bother you. I don't think there's necessarily anything wrong with that mentality, but I also don't think that's what head collars should be for.

Head collars are a great tool to have better control of a dog because you can manipulate it's head instead of just it's body. I think they can be a good choice for reactive dogs or for a dog who's being difficult to train LLW with because they get too distracted for treat training or something because you can easily re-direct the way the dog is facing, but IMO they shouldn't be the first thing you try when teaching LLW.

I really like front clip "no pull" harnesses for LLW. I use them on my dogs from puppyhood. They give you a little more control in handling the dog because you can easily turn them to face you and don't have the problems that collars do (such as constricting breathing, possibly damaging the trachea, etc- I have a brachycephallic dog so those issues are especially a worry for me). I use Easy Walk harnesses and like them, especially because they seem to be available everywhere these days, but keep in mind some dogs can get out of them. Freedom Harnesses can be harder to find, but they are harder for dogs to get out of. They also have a clip at the back that you can use when you want. There is some research that shows front-clip harnesses can interrupt the natural gait of dogs (even without leashes attached), so I wouldn't recommend leaving it on unless it's actually being used and I definitely would not use it if you're planning to be doing more than walking (hiking, jogging, even just walking on rough terrain).

Keep in mind that dogs almost always need to be conditioned to tolerate head collars.

Also keep in mind that as the person said above none of the "no pull" stuff will inherently teach LLW- they will just make it easier to teach, they are just management tools to make pulling harder for the dog or uncomfortable and to increase the leverage or control the handler has.
 

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Such a device works because it is uncomfortable or even painful for the puppy. I think that's a bit mean to do with a little animal child.
It can also be damaging for the relationship, if the dog is more sensitive.
it could learn to avoid you to avoid pain.
I don't know about you, but I want my dog to think that being with me is great and fun and not scary and potentially hurtful.

I don't think you need some special training device to teach leash-walking.
the only things you need is a leash, a collar or a harness, something rewarding like a toy or very high-value treats and patience.
 

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It's not a good idea.
I used it with my dog and she hurt herself because she pulled too hard. Her neck pain was very severe! It was horrible! I felt so guilty!!

Unfortunately there are no quick fixed when it comes to behavior modification!
Patience & time go a long way!

I suggest you make small walks (5min), few times a day. And really work with her and reward her! It's better to have 4-5 successful moments that 1 long walk with a lot of pulling!

Hope it helps!
Love
xx
 

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Head collars are like already said a tool. One that normally requires training to help a dog feel comfortable wearing plus polite walking training afterwards. Also, not a tool you should use if you plan to give your puppy some length in the leash (whiplash can happen if dog hits end of lead with some force). And it's incredibly common for dogs to become collar savvy (don't pull and behave when wearing head collar but do when walked on flat collars or something else the owner was hoping to switch to). It's very difficult for most people to successfully switch tools and in the end generally requires starting from the very beginning with the new collar or harness anyway. So don't use if not willing to use for your dogs entire life.

Honestly with a young puppy, I would just spend the time training polite walking on a flat collar or harness (whatever you wanted to walk your puppy in for the majority of his life) the puppy is already comfy in.

There's a polite walking sticky thread in the behavior and training sticky subforum. If you can't find it someone I'm sure will happily give you the link.
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I just use a regular harness and a leash when training LLW with a dog. My rescue dog is awesome on the leash now. I find with LLW, it's more about building voluntary focus and impulse control alongside the leash walking skills. Plus, in my classes, I always teach my students how to correctly hold and use the leash:

https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/safe-or-unsafe-leash-handling/

Too many people do #4 and say that the leash is never loose with their dog and their dogs actually have the skills to LLW, but they are never given the chance to do so.
 

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I agree that it is not a great idea to use one on a puppy. They do not teach the dog how to walk nicely on lead, they are a tool. You still need to do the training, and that would be better to do with whatever you plan on walking your dog on, be it collar or harness. I do use one on Freyja, but it is for safety. She is over 120lbs now and both I and my BF have back problems. If she really pulls she could hurt us, though I'm more concerned for my BF than me. She listens well to me. I have switched to a no pull harness and use that when we are out, again mostly for our safety. She is strong and young. She does walk well most of the time, but she still gets excited when she sees another dog. So, work on LLW. If you need to add in a front clip harness, but they too are just tools. You still need to work on training.
 

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I wouldn't use one one a pup, but think the cruelty of it is way overstressed. Yes, they are a management tool, but so is a harness. Ideally, work on LLW with a regular collar. If that doesn't work, try a harness, then a head collar. My dog wake great on one and it helps his reactivity... And we have worked on LLW.
 
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