Dog Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an 3 month old Golden puppy that i want to introduce to duck/dove smell, guns, and just hunting in general.

I'm not really sure how to go about doing this. His father is a natural hunter and was never really "trained" so to speak. I'd like Shiner to have a bit more training when it comes time for him to hunt, mainly for my brother who will just be getting out of the military when hunting season rolls around.

So any tips and advice will be apreciated. If you have any questions please ask, I'm sure I wasn't as clear as I could be. I didn't quite know what to specify.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,331 Posts
Well, I would take it very slow with gun breaking. He's probably too young for that. You can set him up for success though by pairing some loud sounds such as clapping, with special delicious treats. Work your way up to louder sounds such as banging a pot. Watch pup carefully to see if he has any fear at all. If he does, back off and go back down a few levels.

Ideally the introduction of guns is best done along with bird work. However there are other ways to do it. My dog Josey was introduced to gun fire, starting with a far-off .22, in conjunction with his favorite foods. We worked up slowly to a 20 gauge fired nearby. I'd still say it would have been better had I used a blank pistol at the moment he was chasing birds.

In any case, don't be in a hurry. Puppies by nature are more timid than adult dogs, so you are more likely to MAKE him gun shy if you start too early. I'd wait for the gun lessons until he's at least 6 months, if not more like 9 months.

I'd recommend you hop over to a gun dog forum too. We don't have many hunters here, so I'm not sure how much good advice you are going to get from us.

Meanwhile, I'd be working with your little pup on "fun retrieves" and lots of positive associations with training. I'd recommend you only use positives with the little one as he is so young that any "corrections" are more likely to scare him than teach him anything. If you make training fun for him, you set him up for success the rest of his life. On the other hand, if training is unpleasant at this age, he'll never enjoy it later and you'll have a recalcitrant student for ever.

Here's a great book that gives the fundamentals of teaching and learning. Its not specifically about dog training, but reading this, I promise you, will make you the best dog trainer of all your friends! (especially better than those who sill abide by the "corrections" methods of bird dog training.)
Amazon.com: Don't Shoot the Dog!: The New Art of Teaching and Training (9781860542381): Karen Pryor: Books

You'll get better results, faster, and you'll have a happier dog in the end.

Enjoy, and good luck with the pup!
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top