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Hello, Ive heard of two "styles" to train dogs. One is asserting yourself as the "pack leader" thus the dog listens to you because of its evolutionary traits.

The other being the "love" style. In which you train your dog so that it listens to you because it cares about you and wants to please you.

Is this kind of a breed specific training?

I kind of disagree with the first one as humans have bred dogs for thousands of years to not display the traits of the wild canines, However i feel it may be good for dogs like Akitas, then again ive never had an akita, just what i read.
 

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There are actually three styles of training. The third method is based on drive training which has been adapted for pet dogs by veteran trainer Kevin Behan, it is called Natural Dog Training. This is the method I have settled on because it works.
 

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On this board you will not find people who subscribe to the "pack leader" style. This forum is centered around positive-reinforcement training, and the dominance-theory training style may be discussed, it is against forum rules to suggest any type of training that uses punishment.

Personally, I pull from various "schools of thought" regarding dog training. I'm rather traditional about some things (more "pack leader" mentality, I guess), but I use a lot of positive reinforcement as well. I love my dogs to pieces, and they get lots and lots of affection, play, and treats, but I also give corrections when necessary.

The most important thing, to me, is being consistent and keeping negative emotions (ie: anger or frustration) completely out of the equation.
 

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"A dog doesn’t work for pride in accomplishment, to earn respect from a leader, praise, rewards or even play or positive experiences."

I'm kind of confused by this? Why wouldn't dogs work for rewards?

"A dog wants to be part of a team. Everything in a dog’s life is secondary to this social drive."
"In the canine mind teamwork revolves around hunting"
Then wouldn't being part of the team be the reward?
Dogs are social animals but aren't they mostly scavengers?
And don't some feral dogs live solitary?
 

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You need to delve more deeply into the canine mind to understand what Natural Dog Training is about. If you are interested, read Kevin Behan's book, Your Dog is Your Mirror, or start reading his blog.
 

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Hi @Alexp08! There are actually lots of other models for dog training beyond what you've already encountered, including modern, scientifically-based training that has nothing to do with "dominance" or "pack leader" myths. Lots of good books you might check out, starting with Dr. Sophia Yin's How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves (which a lot of public libraries have, or can order for you via inter-library loan). If you like youtube, Kikopup is a great trainer who has posted lots and lots of video tutorials showing how to train a variety of handy things.
 

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You've set up a false dichotomy. I don't teach either way, my dogs don't listen to me because I train them with "love" or because they want to please me.

I train using primarily positive reinforcement with judicious dashes of positive and negative punishment.
 

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As far as books, I would read "The Culture Clash" and "Don't Shoot the Dog." Not specifically about training techniques but more about how dogs learn and how we interact with them.
 

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Hmm. Neither? I just reward behaviors I like without judging the mentality behind them and ignore behaviors I don't like.

My puppy is pretty independent. He's very food motivated and generally likes to see me in a good mood, but he doesn't care about praise at all. Like he'll generally try to do lots of the good things I've taught him and he's happy when I'm happy, but he won't do a specific action just because he think I'll like it.

I don't believe in the pack/dominance mentality. When you meet people who support this theory, ask them about their approach to personal relationships. It just so happens that these people also think personal relationships are about establishing dominance. One man I spoke to described using the same approach with his girlfriend, and told me about how he'd break up with girls who weren't responsive to it.

That said, dogs have certain instincts, and it's our job to teach them express those instincts in a way that's compatible with us. Dogs aren't wolves - they're not wild animals, and they've been bred to communicate with humans and be our companions. So it's our job to teach them how to communicate with us.

For example, checking in. Sustained eye contact signals aggression for dogs. It's taken me months to train my puppy to give me any eye contact at all, and then periodically check in and feel safe when I look at his eyes. I had to teach him that when I look at him, it's not to signify aggression. Now at 10 months we give each other sustained, soft eye contact several times a day. But it took work to get there.

I think some dominance theory is useful as far as teaching us where dog's instincts lie so we can work with those instincts. But I do think it's our job to use those instincts to our advantage to teach them how humans work.
 

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I train using primarily positive reinforcement with judicious dashes of positive and negative punishment.
Just want to post some links about the 4 quadrants of operant conditioning in case anyone is unfamiliar with them :)

4 Paws University Sacramento Dog Training Positive Reinforcement
http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/4-quadrants-operant-conditioning-23702/


I also found this article on different training methods Dog Training Methods and Behavior Problems
 

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Like the majority of everyone else on this forum, I am a positive trainer. I will treat the behaviour I like. But I also will say "no" to Chester and I sometimes use interupting sounds to interrupt undisirable behaviour, then I redericted him to what he should be doing and treated/praised for that.

It is refreshing to be sorrounded by people who pick the positive reinforcement method here on this forum. There are so many dominance dog owners in my area.
 

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dogs, like humans, are to some point opportunists.
they choose an activity or an object that is rewarding for them over something that is less rewarding for them.
I train my dog by rewarding him for wanted behaviour, either with treat or playing.
We have an abort command but we seldomly use it, redirecting the dog's attention and ask for an alternative behaviour works better for us.

I like my dog, but I don't train him with "love" to listen. He's listening because he is conditioned that follwing a command is rewarding for him.

I most definitively don't train him CM style. I don't need to be a pack leader to make my dog work together with me.
I'd especially not recommend using this style with big, independed breeds like the Akita. this can end up pretty ugly.
 

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I use neither of those. I use positive reinforcement and a tiny bit of negative punishment.

My boy does love me, and cares about me but that is not why he obeys me. He obeys because he's learned that's the best way to get what he wants, usually food but sometimes real world rewards, and he listens because some commands it's become a habit. I learned long ago that dogs tend to do what works to get them what they want and I just capitalize on that and use it to train him.
 
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