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So today we found out Ashas best friend Molly, one of a few dogs she is allowed to play with and the only dog Asha has been in contact with for the past 2 weeks, has kennel cough. Molly was at the dog park and played with three dogs on Saturday (two of which we have known for years). Apparently it doesn't really show for 2-3 days, so Molly was showing no real symptoms yesterday (Monday), so we met up like we do most weekdays and Asha and Molly had a play date, but today Mollys owner told us she had been to the vet and found out Molly has kennel cough. :(

Now we have to wait and see if Asha starts showing symptoms. Both Molly and Asha are immunised for it but apparently dogs can get a mild case of it even while immunised.
 

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There are different strains of kennel cough, so unfortunately a dog is never truly 100% immune. Hopefully Asha doesn't get it, but is easily treated if so.
 

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The dog was not "immunized" by the vaccine, immunization and vaccination are two completely different things. Kennel cough vaccine is one of the most ineffective vaccines.

Three Critical Problems With The Kennel Cough Vaccine (and what you need to do about them) - Dogs Naturally Magazine


Problem 1: the vaccine doesn’t work all that well

Just like we’ll probably never find a cure for the common cold, we haven’t found a cure for the dog’s common cold. Here’s the reason why the common intranasal kennel cough vaccine isn’t a terribly good idea:

There are at least forty agents that cause bordetella …

But only a couple of these agents are contained in the vaccine.

This makes the bordetella vaccine a complete shot in the dark. In fact, the odds of the vaccine working are so long, that noted veterinary immunologist Dr Ronald Schultz concludes …

“Kennel Cough is not a vaccinatable disease.”

Hardly a ringing endorsement from the most qualified veterinary immunologist in the world. But despite this, vets still vaccinate a staggering number of dogs for this simple problem every day.

Maybe they do this because they figure that there’s a small chance the vaccine will indeed work – and the vaccine is just an intranasal spray, so it’s pretty safe, right?

Well, that leads us to the next problem …

Problem 2: the vaccine is not safe

Most vaccines these days are something called modified live vaccines. It’s been shown that the “modified” viruses in human vaccines embed themselves in the genes of the host and can shuffle around and reactivate thirty or more years after vaccination.

Problem 3: somebody did some bad math

Here’s a little known fact: vaccinated dogs shed the disease they were vaccinated against into the environment.

Dogs that are vaccinated for kennel cough will shed that disease for up to 7 weeks and parainfluenza for a week (I should probably mention that a lot of the bordetella vaccines also include influenza).
 

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The only reason that I get the bordatella vaccine is that I sometimes have to kennel my dog and the kennel requires the dogs have that vaccine. If it wasn't for that I'd opt out. For me the benefits of that vaccine are iffy at best.
 

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Now we have to wait and see if Asha starts showing symptoms. Both Molly and Asha are immunised for it but apparently dogs can get a mild case of it even while immunised.
If your dogs immune system is high she probably wont get it. I used to run a boarding facility and had a dog come in with it. She did not show symptoms until she had been there for a couple of days. I had 10 other dogs there and none of the others got it. I did not requite that vaccine to come to my facility. I have never given it to my dogs.
 
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