Dog Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have always had Aussies. Violet is #5. The only difference is she was 14 weeks old when I got her. All the others were between 6-8 week. Housetraining them was a cinch. By 8-10 weeks they were golden ! Violet had been supposedly brought up on pee pads but I seriously doubt it. I bought a pack and she acted like she'd never seen one before. She pees and poops everywhere. I take her out first thing in the morning, after breakfast and all day long. She still pees in the house. I bought a bell. She rings it & I immediately take her out but sometimes she rings it AFTER she goes. I work from home so I can watch her but in those few moments I need to concentrate on my work, thats when she pees. Sometimes right behind me as I sit at the computer !! She makes no noise at all. I just can't figure out what to do with her. I just want to cry. I have never , ever had this problem.
Please someone give me a clue here. Aussies are one of the smartest breeds but she's acting like a dumbass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
No not 5 yrs . Shes only 4 mos old. Shes my 5th Aussie. The other 4 were super easy to house train but shes a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
No not 5 yrs . Shes only 4 mos old. Shes my 5th Aussie. The other 4 were super easy to house train but shes a problem.
So to clarify, she’s 4 months old and you’ve had her since 14 weeks (3,5 months). Then you’ve only been able to train her for half a month. I would say to give it some time. Some dogs takes longer than other. How often do you take her out? If she keeps peeing and pooping everywhere in the house, maybe you should take her out more often.

Maybe try to make a schedule so she’s always get to go outside at the same times everyday. If accidents keep happening, decrease the time between the potty breaks. And of course the basic things as taking her out after she’s eaten, played or been sleeping. The bell thing is very clever but don’t rely on it if She doesn’t completely understand it yet. Is it possible for you to limit her to an area where you could easily keep an eye on her while working?

But in general, if she repeatedly keeps going inside she probably needs to go out more often.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,623 Posts
Ah, that makes more sense. A vet check might still be a good idea but there are a couple of things I'd suggest.

First, I hate pads for puppies anyway, they give confusing mixed messages about whether indoor toileting is allowed or not. So the issue may have started when she was in her previous home.

I'd also advise against bells, dogs often learn they are for being allowed out, as opposed to being let out for toileting. So again, a slightly mixed message.

I'm sure you know this but to cover all bases, toilet training happens when two things come together - the ABILITY to hold the toilet, along with the DESIRE to hold it in order to earn the reward for doing so.

Ideally you want her to not be in a position where she needs to toilet before you have her outdoors, so that every toilet is outside. So set her up to succeed by taking her out (not waiting for her to ask) even more than she needs; for example every 45 minutes to an hour and always after sleeping, eating, playing.

When she toilets outdoors make a huge fuss (never mind the neighbours, act like outdoor toileting is the best thing you have ever seen) and reward her with a high value treat. Do that immediately, don't make her come to you for the treat so she is clear that it's for toileting and not for coming to you. The idea is that she wants to earn the treat enough to hold the toilet until she is outside - provided there is no UTI and she is physically able to control her toileting obviously.

As she is actually performing the toilet you can introduce words she can associate with it (like 'do weewee' and 'busy busy') that later when she is reliably trained you can use these to tell her when you want her to toilet.

If you take her out and she doesn't toilet after five minutes, bring her in but don't take your eyes off her. Any hint of a toilet inside, scoop her up and get her out fast. If she doesn't try to toilet indoors (great!) take her out a second time and repeat until you do get outside toilets. You need the outside toilet to happen SO that you can reward SO that she learns.

If she has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed she may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if she needs to toilet - the opposite of what you want. Dogs cant make the distinction between you being annoyed at them TOILETING, as opposed to toileting INDOORS. Take a rolled up newspaper and hit yourself over the head for not having taken her outside in time. Not when she is there though in case you scare her. Then clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract her back to the spot. Indoors if you see her circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get her out fast.

Overnight she is unlikely to be able to control her toilet as her little bladder and bowel are underdeveloped and not strong enough to hold all night so set your alarm to take her out at least once if not twice during the night.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top