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All my life i have wanted a dog, but for various reasons couldnt have one, now that it is possible at last i am not very sure of what kind of dog i want. I am 17 and will be leaving for college in a year, i wanted a cuddly affectionate breed to stay with me while i watch tv and while i am sitting down doing whatever, it is also important that it is toy sized, i can go on two 1-hour long walks a day, i would also like to train my dog to do some tricks.
So, a cuddly affectionate and intelligent breed to spend the larger part of a day with, the least shedding the better.
I have narrowed it down to three choices, a toy poodle a yorkie or a maltese.
Please tell me what breed YOU think is best for me guven what i have said(please dont say its up to you, im here for opinions and help) and also what other breed you would recomend.
 

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I think since you are starting out and still in college, I would go with an adult or adolesent dog. It doesn't matter weather it's purebred or not. go to a rescue group who does fostering. Tell them what you are looking for and they will find your perfect pet.

But if you are truely set on purebred, find a reputable breeder and see if they have older pups for sale or even retired show dogs up for sale.

I do not think a puppy would fit your lifestyle from what you described. (Maybe later on when you are wiser and older and have enough time for a puppy you can look into getting a puppy.) Puppy are work work work work and they will not just sit around like you want.

Also, yorkies and poodles though they don't shed as much have a high grooming need. Their coats constantly grows and you have to brush/comb them and cut them all the time. And a friend of mine has a toy poodle and they are balls of energy. And yorkies, though I've never met one in person are part of hte terrier group and terriers are known for the abundance of energy. A simple long walk will not give these guys their exercise.

I don't know much about maltese so I can't comment there. But here is my opinion.

Retired show dog
-able to control their energy but they are going to need more then a long walk.
-already house trained (a puppy may or may not learn fast enough to do their buisness outside and you will have loads of accedents to clean up after.)
-comes with commands (unlike a puppy who will only have doggy manners will not know to come when called. Will not know how to sit or give paw or lay down.)
-bragging rights (think about it, you can brag how your dog has points in what shows and brag brag brag, but make sure you give credit to your breeder because they did the work in winning shows.)

Take me. I will be moving soon and I am already on a breeder's waiting list. (I'm in the top 5, but after adopting Kuma my recent rescue, I'm debating if I should take a retried show dog instead of a puppy. I got spoiled with Kuma because he came house trained and came with the command SIT. It's true he wasn't a show dog, but I liked that all I had ot show him is where he HAD to go and he never did anything in the house. (except one time, but that's because hubby forgot to take him out to do his buisness.)
Where as, I have to house train the puppy and have to clean up after their accedents, plus I won't be garenteed the puppy will learn in 1 week or 1 month or more to be house trained.
and the boundless energy puppies have. It's exhausting. (I have puppy fever righ tnow because my sister has got a puppy and I was just visiting and man I got burnt out very quickly.)

So, I think you should first look for a rescue group who does fostering and find out if they have a dog who has minimum shedding, moderetly low energy needs, and a lazy bug who LOVES to be cuddled all day and all long.
 
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First of all, do you plan on / are considering staying in residence? That is something to consider before making the commitment, as a lot of campus housing will not permit dogs or cats.

Since you have a year ahead of you, it might also be wise to start a savings fund for doggy emergencies. I remember that 2 weeks after our family got our first puppy, he was bitten by a dog and needed leg casting and aftercare worth $2000. Ouch!!! That's not including what we spend shortly after to vaccinate and neuter him. Fortunately, even $75 a month saved for emergencies will amount to almost $1000 next January.

As for your bred choices, maltese are my preference but you have really narrowed this down! All three are more or less the same with regards to exercise requirements, grooming budget, etc. If I were you, I would volunteer to walk dogs in your neighborhood. These guys are quite popular with retired folks especially (who might really appreciate the break!) and it's an excellent way to familiarize yourself with the breeds.
 

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I think since you are starting out and still in college, I would go with an adult or adolesent dog. It doesn't matter weather it's purebred or not. go to a rescue group who does fostering. Tell them what you are looking for and they will find your perfect pet.

But if you are truely set on purebred, find a reputable breeder and see if they have older pups for sale or even retired show dogs up for sale.

I do not think a puppy would fit your lifestyle from what you described. (Maybe later on when you are wiser and older and have enough time for a puppy you can look into getting a puppy.) Puppy are work work work work and they will not just sit around like you want.

Also, yorkies and poodles though they don't shed as much have a high grooming need. Their coats constantly grows and you have to brush/comb them and cut them all the time. And a friend of mine has a toy poodle and they are balls of energy. And yorkies, though I've never met one in person are part of hte terrier group and terriers are known for the abundance of energy. A simple long walk will not give these guys their exercise.

I don't know much about maltese so I can't comment there. But here is my opinion.

Retired show dog
-able to control their energy but they are going to need more then a long walk.
-already house trained (a puppy may or may not learn fast enough to do their buisness outside and you will have loads of accedents to clean up after.)
-comes with commands (unlike a puppy who will only have doggy manners will not know to come when called. Will not know how to sit or give paw or lay down.)
-bragging rights (think about it, you can brag how your dog has points in what shows and brag brag brag, but make sure you give credit to your breeder because they did the work in winning shows.)

Take me. I will be moving soon and I am already on a breeder's waiting list. (I'm in the top 5, but after adopting Kuma my recent rescue, I'm debating if I should take a retried show dog instead of a puppy. I got spoiled with Kuma because he came house trained and came with the command SIT. It's true he wasn't a show dog, but I liked that all I had ot show him is where he HAD to go and he never did anything in the house. (except one time, but that's because hubby forgot to take him out to do his buisness.)
Where as, I have to house train the puppy and have to clean up after their accedents, plus I won't be garenteed the puppy will learn in 1 week or 1 month or more to be house trained.
and the boundless energy puppies have. It's exhausting. (I have puppy fever righ tnow because my sister has got a puppy and I was just visiting and man I got burnt out very quickly.)

So, I think you should first look for a rescue group who does fostering and find out if they have a dog who has minimum shedding, moderetly low energy needs, and a lazy bug who LOVES to be cuddled all day and all long.
I would like a dog i can spend a lot of time with, getting an old dog doesnt give me much time, i have no problem with grooming as long as the dog doesnt shed much and i already did check my local rescue, they have only mixes ans they all shed(shedding is a big issue) in addition to the 2 hours of walking i am also planning on 15 minutes of training a day and playtime. What breed do you recomend?
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I agree with natenqen. An older dog would need less basic training e.g toilet training. There are thousands of beautiful loving dogs in rescue centers and I am sure you will be able to find a small dog that fits your description. All dogs need constant love, attention and training however puppy's require that extra bit more. They need someone home with them as often as possible and can not be left home alone for long periods of time. Many small breed dogs can be just as high energy as larger breeds and need a lot of exercise. If you are looking for a dog that does not shed I would recommend a miniature Schnauzer. They are small (not toy), intelligent and active but also love to cuddle up on the couch!

I hope you find the perfect dog to love and care for.
 

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The above posters are not saying get an old dog, their saying get a dog that is well past the puppy stage. Which I fully agree with. A dog around age 4 can still live up to its late teens so that is a very long time.

I was not recommend a puppy as you will be starting college and raising a puppy should take up the majority of your time ensure it is trained, socialised and well balanced.

I would keep looking into rescues, a dog will come along that fits your current situation.
 

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I agree, im in the same boat as you. Ill be going off to collage this year (after senior year ends and summer of coarse) And even though ill be living from home the first two years I know theres no way I would have time to care for a young puppy. There a lot of work, and a big commitment. They need lots of play time, potty brakes and stuff to chew. In my personal opinion to get a young puppy you really need to be able to commit yourself to the dog, and be prepared for possibly having to wake up in the middle of the night because they have to go to the bathroom.
As to what BusterBCsMum, when I was younger we got a 4 year old dog and she lived for 10 years, that's a lot time to spend with a dog. Maybe a adult French bulldog that doesn't have a overly brachycephalic (smooshed in) might be good.
 

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I would like a dog i can spend a lot of time with, getting an old dog doesnt give me much time, i have no problem with grooming as long as the dog doesnt shed much and i already did check my local rescue, they have only mixes ans they all shed(shedding is a big issue) in addition to the 2 hours of walking i am also planning on 15 minutes of training a day and playtime. What breed do you recomend?
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As others have already stated for me, I didn't mean a senior dog. A dog that is an adult. Say 2 to 6 years old would be perfect for you. Small dogs, especially toys breeds tend to live a very long time. The pug I had when I was younger I got I think around 7 years old. He went well into 18 to 20 years old before we had to put him down. That's 10 plus years I had with him and it didn't seem long enough. I adopted Kuma at age 6 and according to my vet, he is healthy so far and I have no problem that he will live to at least his high teens. I'd say 9 to 10 years maybe even more. (A friend of mine had a small, hairy mutt of unknown heritage and she lived to 22 years old before they had to put her down. They adopted her at around 4 years old according to the vet.)

And for breed recommendation, out of the three I vote for Maltese though I heard they shed too.

Also, unless you get this puppy from a byber or puppymill, you will have to wait a few years before you can get a puppy. Reputable breeders, especially of small breeds tend to already have a waiting list. So, if you want a puppy NOW, they won't give it to you because there are already people ahead of you. As I've stated before, I'm already on a puppy waiting list, but that was almost over 2 years ago. (I still keep in contact with the breeder and she lets me know when she has a litter now because I'm in the top 5 waiting list.) So even if you do want a puppy you will have to wait a few years. Just fyi.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, so i will look for a slightly older dog, how young can it be; more than a year?
Also what breed should i get.
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All my life i have wanted a dog, but for various reasons couldnt have one, now that it is possible at last i am not very sure of what kind of dog i want. I am 17 and will be leaving for college in a year, i wanted a cuddly affectionate breed to stay with me while i watch tv and while i am sitting down doing whatever, it is also important that it is toy sized, i can go on two 1-hour long walks a day, i would also like to train my dog to do some tricks.
I'm not sure that being 17 and leaving for college in a year is the best time for getting a dog. I'm sure your heart is in the right place, and your intentions are the very best, but life can change a lot at your age. Can you even take a dog to college? What will the dog do while you are in class? Will you be sharing living spaces with other people, and how will that impact your dog? Will you be able to afford any vet visits it may need, and will you be willing to give up any potential social life to take care of your dog? Is your dog going to be easily able to adapt to moving from where you are now (presumably home), to college, back home for holidays/breaks, back to college, etc.? Many dogs are fine with change, but some dogs become very anxious if they have to cope with too much change.

I'm sorry to be a wet blanket, and perhaps you've already considered all this, but I've recently read a few stories about young people trying to 'live' the college lifestyle with their dog and the dog has ended up in jeopardy.

You may be, and I sincerely hope you are, the rare young person who is able to take on the responsibility a dog entails, so please think it over very carefully. If you do decide to hold off on getting a dog, why not volunteer at kennels/rescues? That way, you could get to know a variety of dogs - you'd learn a lot about what it takes to care for a dog, you'd get a regular 'dog-fix', and you might even run across a breed that you hadn't considered, but which would be perfect for you when you are truly settled.
 

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One other way to get a dog fix when you're in college is to dog sit or dog walk. Professors often need someone to help out with both of those jobs--say they need to be gone at a conference for three or four days and need someone to take care of their dogs. You could save any money you get paid for doing so in a "dog account" of your own and get some idea of how ready you are to be a full time dog owner as well as what types of dogs you might prefer.

Sometimes vets need kennel help in the evening and weekends as well, hours that can work out well for college students looking for part time work.
 

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look into the rescue organizations rather than humane siciety, a dog that's been fostered will come with a better temperament and life style description so you can really ween out your match.
1-2 hours of outside time/ day?
Boston Terriers are lovely, friendly and don't bark so ideal if you find yourself in an apartment/condo after school.
They are also snuggle bugs and will just sit with you while you read.
I see you mentioned poodles, they can tend to bark. Not good for roommates or apartments.

I new someone with a Yorkie standard size. Lovely friendly, I also know someone with two teacups and they are afraid of everything.
I find many of those tiny breeds not very friendly. What are you going to do when friends come over and doggy is upset and jealous acting out?
Your probably going to be social in collage so get a friendly breed.
Oh also, a teacup dog probably can't do much activity outdoors. You may end up needing a backpack for them.
Just make sure you consider where you might be after school. I live in a university town and I often see give away dogs on kijiji from students finishing school and now they want to travel or are moving and can't take the dog. It's just sad.
 

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Are you living at home? Because most colleges don't allow dogs in the dorms unless they're service dogs. However, I would say mini or toy poodles are smart, don't shed and very trainable. (Don't get a "teacup", they're just poorly bred, sickly and deformed!) Unless you have a lot of time, I would also get an adult dog. Even if you got a dog that was 1-3 it could easily live until you are in your late 20s. There ARE plenty of dog rescues and private shelters that have poodles, poodle mixes and other dogs that don't shed. Just do NOT go to a pet store, and if you get a puppy go to a breeder that lets you see the mom, and that she's in good condition. But I do think it's important to make sure you have enough time and money to have a dog. You don't want to end up leaving it at home alone a lot with your parents because then the dog will end up being theirs. When I was 12 I got a puppy and he was mine, slept with me and very loyal to me. When I went away to college he was very upset with me and started being more of my mom's dog, even when I was home visiting. To dogs it's quantity time, not quality!
 
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