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My puppy occasionally accidentally gets my hand (or other parts) when I'm playing with her. I generally say "no" or "ow" (but have stopped yelping, as it seems to excite her), and walk away. She definitely getting better about it, more careful and less likely to get so over excited when playing, but it still happens a few times a day. She almost never breaks skin, and only when she's hit a delicate area of skin like the cuticle, or right after I got out of the shower and my skin was soft from soaking in so much water.
However, it really upsets me when it happens and it makes me feel angry towards in a way I don't like.
I'm not necessarily looking for suggestions, just some understanding or shared experiences. I never use that anger to lash out at her, I just wish it didn't happen.
 

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My Cocker mix is super-duper-insanely impulsive. He's a sweetheart and a riot at times but I don't think I've ever had a dog who acted so frequently without thinking. He's incredibly smart, but high-strung and a bit of a powerhouse.

This tends to lead to nipping (and, IMO, to some of his other issues as well). He has to be reminded pretty much every time to take treats nicely. He can totally do it - but it's not his first instinct. He's also rather mouthy but I've found freezing completely (no movement at all) when he starts to mouth me stops him right away. Again, it's like he doesn't really mean to, he just forgets.

I know how you feel; it's very frustrating at times. We're trying to work on impulse control as well as upping exercise outside where we do training as well to give him an outlet for all his energy. It helps some. I hope that paired with some maturity will work to our advantage. :p
 

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It sounds as though your puppy gets quite over-stimulated, I would work on some mental stimulation, clicker training etc as a way of not only tiring her out and giving you some down time but also teaching her the behaviour you do want, rather that reacting to the behaviour you don't want, such as nipping.

I also think it would be beneficial to work on some relaxed behaviours, again if you were to clicker train her, you could use this to your advantage in order to reward the quiet times, essentially you're positively rewarding nothing as sometimes that's exactly what we would like from our dogs, for example you could treat her for lying down in her bed, or for playing quietly with a toy, basically if you want to see more of a behaviour, you need to reinforce it!

I think if you kept the over-stimulation to a minimum, worked on teaching some calm behaviours and did more mental training with her, you'd see a positive effect on all aspects of her behaviour and your relationship.

Laus
 
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