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Discussion Starter #1
Is anyone familiar with any complications that could cause this to happen? My 4 year old mini dachshund had bladder stone removal surgery yesterday and had been peeing blood since then and vomited blood twice yesterday. Today she was only throwing up water but wouldn't eat. We were supposed to take her back to the vet tomorrow afternoon but we called and asked if it was normal and they said that the peeing blood was normal and if she only vomited blood twice then that was ok. They said that if she still wouldn't eat then we should bring her in the morning to get fluids. When I went to check on her and see if she would eat a few bites of food she wasn't really breathing and wasn't moving at all. The vet wouldn't answer so I had to have my husband call his friend who searched around for a vet that was open and before I knew it she was dead.

I'm currently living in a foreign country and my husband is traveling this week so I don't understand the language, but I insisted we go to a vet anyway and we found one that was open and they said that yes she had passed away and it felt like there was blood in her stomach and the blood from her catheter (she was wearing a pamper to catch it) was very dark so she said that her little body just could't handle the surgery. I just don't understand what that means. So internal bleeding, but from what? I searched online and I didn't see any complications that resulted in internal bleeding. We have to bury her tomorrow bc it's so very hot here that they do those things right away so I'm trying to see if they can open her up and tell me for sure bc I just don't understand what "her body couldn't handle it" means. Does anyone know? I don't want to blame the other vet for killing her but why else would a perfectly healthy 4 year old die right after a supposedly routine surgery? I'm at a loss right now.
 

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I'm so sorry. :(
Tentatively, I would say the vet made a mistake during the surgery, or at the very least, when she had complications and was vomiting and peeing blood, they should have considered it an emergency, it is not "normal" or "okay" and should have seen you right away.
One of my past dogs situation was very different, but when he started vomiting blood (once), I called the vet and they said to bring him in ASAP as they considered it an emergency. Unfortunately it turned out he was in the final stages of renal failure and the vet was unable to save him.
A healthy four year old dog should be able to handle a bladder stone removal surgery, female dogs are routinely in for spays, which are just as/more intrusive, so I think "her body couldn't handle it" is not true, unless the surgery wasn't performed correctly.
 

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Im so sorry this has happened to you and your pet :(
It could be anything ,maybe the bladder was not sutured up well? Maybe they didn't notice they got a blood vessel?
From experience they don't usually have blood in their urine after surgery, that's why surgery is performed
But Im not a vet so I don't know it really could be any number of things.
 

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"Some" Bbood in Urine post Cystotomy not uncommon due to abrasion to the bladder wall from stone. Vomiting blood is an EMERGENCY I am SHOCKED to hear how dismissive they were about that. Any chance she could have gotten into rat bait? I would take her into a different vet and have them preform a necropsy. I am so very sorry for your loss. Please take care during this difficult time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for your replies. I definitely feel like the vet did something wrong. The other vet we went to performed an autopsy this morning and told our friend that she had kidney and pancreas problems and her blood was blackish, not red, which was a clear sign of internal problems and that it wasn't the surgery, it was that she couldn't bear it.

I still don't understand what that means or how that's possible bc the original vet who performed the surgery did blood tests, X-rays, and an ultrasound so how is it possible that she had all of these problems and they didn't see it.
 

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So sorry you lost your pet. Its so difficult to lose our little fur babies, and in your case so unexpected. Surgery for humans and pets, is not without risk, and sometimes no matter how prepared, the unexpected catastrophe occurs. All I have to offer is how sorry I am that you lost your pet.
 

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With the information from the vet who performed the necropsy, it sounds like the original vet messed up. It is very possible that her blood work and other tests may have gotten mixed up with another dogs, and so the original vet thought she was healthy enough for the surgery when she really wasn't. :(
 

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Going to be really hard to know what happened. Very sad to hear this happened, but it certainly is an uncommon result of such a surgery. Urinating with some blood is very common after a cystotomy... in fact, more common than not having blood in the urine, at least for a day or so (cystotomy requires cutting the bladder open, and this is a very vascular organ and bleeding is definitely the norm)... but I have to agree that vomiting blood is very odd and certainly would be something I would be very concerned about. If you went through the process of having a necropsy done, I certainly hope stomach tissues were saved, along with kidney, liver and bladder tissues (otherwise it will all be a matter of guessing and conjecture... nothing will be able to be proven one way or the other). Would be helpful to know what medications she was on and what medications were given for anesthesia and the day of surgery. All that will be in the medical record if you are curious.
 
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