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Hey everyone. I just need to ran more than anything, but feel free to weigh in if you'd like.

My mom's heart dog passed (Chrissy) away a couple of months ago. It was very hard for her at first, but she's slowly starting to get better. Yesterday, however, she got something in the mail about the microchips that Gizmo and Chrissy have/had. She called me about it and while she was on the phone she started crying because Chrissy was on there as well. I live in a different town, so there wasn't a whole lot I could do for her easily so I tried to do what I could over the phone. After she sounded better we hung up and I went about my day. Later that evening, she called me again to ask me about the papers Chrissy had with her from the breeder. I told her I had no clue where they were or how to track the breeder down (I was in 7th grade when we got Chrissy, and am now 27, so there's no way I would have thought to keep track of that stuff at the time). I told her I didn't know and asked her why she wanted to know. She told me she was interested in getting a puppy, preferably from the same breeder because Chrissy was such a special dog to her.

As we discussed it, I told her I would be more than happy to help her find a bichon frise breeder in the area and go with her to visit/bring the puppy home. She then began to tell me she wanted another female (which was fine), and, preferably, two or three so they could keep each other company...

No, just no. I tried to tell her that was a terrible idea, but she wasn't interested in hearing why that was a bad idea. Every time I try to tell her, she refuses to listen, and now I'm stuck trying to figure out how to pull the breaks before this train crashes... (Easier said than done when stubbornness runs in the family.)

Needless to say, I doubt we can find a reputable breeder who will actually agree to give my mom more than one puppy, and I am only going to agree to help her pick out one. Thankfully, she said she is going to wait and talk about it with my dad and me before doing anything.
 

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Sorry about your mom's dog. It sounds like she lived a nice, long life though.

Yes, getting more than puppy from the same litter is a bad idea. The main reason is that the pups bond with each other, and not their human owner. This brings with it many behavioural issues and challenges.

There are a lot of articles on the internet on this, but here's a couple for your mom to read for a start:

Adopting Littermates… (Don’t)

Raising Siblings
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry about your mom's dog. It sounds like she lived a nice, long life though.

Yes, getting more than puppy from the same litter is a bad idea. The main reason is that the pups bond with each other, and not their human owner. This brings with it many behavioural issues and challenges.

There are a lot of articles on the internet on this, but here's a couple for your mom to read for a start:

Adopting Littermates… (Don’t)

Raising Siblings
This is the main reason I'm adverse to my mom getting three puppies at the same time. That and the amount of work that would go into having three puppies at the same time... Thanks for those links, I'll keep them to share with my mom.
 

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See if you can tap dance around the issue.

I'd try something like, "Mom, have you thought about getting 1 puppy now and get it trained and bonded to you, then in a year or so get another puppy. That way it will be easier for you since you'll only have 1 puppy to train at a time, and by the time you get the second puppy he'll be able to watch the first one and maybe learn a bit that way."

Doing it that way you're not saying no don't it's a bad idea, but just saying wait for the second one. Also share the links with her so further show her why it's not a wise idea.
 

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See if you can tap dance around the issue.

I'd try something like, "Mom, have you thought about getting 1 puppy now and get it trained and bonded to you, then in a year or so get another puppy. That way it will be easier for you since you'll only have 1 puppy to train at a time, and by the time you get the second puppy he'll be able to watch the first one and maybe learn a bit that way."

Doing it that way you're not saying no don't it's a bad idea, but just saying wait for the second one. Also share the links with her so further show her why it's not a wise idea.
I've been considering approaching it the way you've described. At this point, that seems like the best idea. Thanks for helping reinforce that.
 

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Three dogs of the same age also get old and die around the same age. Is your mother ready to pay the vet bills of three elderly dogs and then losing the others soon after the first one has passed away?

One idea could be to get one adult well-tempered dog now and once it has adjusted to their new home get a puppy to keep it company - or find two or three little adult dogs already bonded looking for a home together.

It may feel that taking care of two puppies would be easier per puppy but I've understood it is double work usually. Huh, to think about housetraining...
 

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Is your mother's heart set on a puppy or would a pair of bonded adult dogs work for her? I ask because a couple (they have children but they're grown) who live up the street from me recently lost their elderly rat terrier and ended up adopting not one but two rat terrier/JRT crosses because they came into the local humane society as a bonded pair. When the wife couldn't bear to separate them, the husband said okay to both. I asked him how it was working out, and he said he was surprised at how well things had gone in terms of the dogs adjusting to their new situation (their previous owner had passed away). He said they both were happy to find a lap of their own to sit in when they felt the need to cuddle, and on the plus side, they were also happy to wear each other out in their fenced yard with minimal human help (though their current owners are pretty athletic themselves--they bike, kayak etc.). I do find it amusing that when I walk by their house with my dog, if just one of the dogs sees us, there's no barking. But if both of them see us, then they bark in unison. I haven't seen them out walking the dogs yet, but I suspect that's just because we walk at different times or in different directions, as I know they walked their previous dog, who lived to a ripe old age and was hale and hearty until the last few months of his life.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Is your mother's heart set on a puppy or would a pair of bonded adult dogs work for her? I ask because a couple (they have children but they're grown) who live up the street from me recently lost their elderly rat terrier and ended up adopting not one but two rat terrier/JRT crosses because they came into the local humane society as a bonded pair. When the wife couldn't bear to separate them, the husband said okay to both. I asked him how it was working out, and he said he was surprised at how well things had gone in terms of the dogs adjusting to their new situation (their previous owner had passed away). He said they both were happy to find a lap of their own to sit in when they felt the need to cuddle, and on the plus side, they were also happy to wear each other out in their fenced yard with minimal human help (though their current owners are pretty athletic themselves--they bike, kayak etc.). I do find it amusing that when I walk by their house with my dog, if just one of the dogs sees us, there's no barking. But if both of them see us, then they bark in unison. I haven't seen them out walking the dogs yet, but I suspect that's just because we walk at different times or in different directions, as I know they walked their previous dog, who lived to a ripe old age and was hale and hearty until the last few months of his life.
Unfortunately, no. She isn't interested in rescuing an adult dog at all. I think because she'd rather start with a puppy if possible. She also needs to have a purebred Bichon because she's allergic and there isn't a way to verify that with a rescue dog unless it is a specific Bichon rescue and they know for sure that the dog is pure bred. She can't even be around yorkies, poodles, and other dogs that don't shed...
 

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Is this breeder responsible? Surely she wouldn't let your mother purchase two of her puppies and would hopefully tell her it's not a good idea.
Well, we can't seem to find the breeder we got Chrissy from, and my mom says that the puppy fever has passed (for now, at least), so I think we're safe for the time being.
 

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I'm glad. It was a situation that unfairly put you in a difficult position. Kudos to you for being willing to do what you could to help your Mom while at the same time finding a pup friendly solution.
 
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