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About I Cloned My Pet: I Cloned My Pet: TLC

This show is crazy, I only saw one episode but I was insane. It costs over 30k to get your dog cloned in korea. Although now that I have my pup I couldn't imagine being without her.

Anybody else seen it?
 

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I've not seen it. I've heard of people cloning their horse too. It will be interesting to see the future reports, however unless you can duplicate the exact experiences and environment, it won't be the same dog. Same mental and physical capacities, I suppose, but learned behaviors and reactions to experiences and environment help mold a dog.

I almost feel sorry for the new pup with the added "expectations" to become the former dog, ya know?

imo
 

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I've not seen it. I've heard of people cloning their horse too. It will be interesting to see the future reports, however unless you can duplicate the exact experiences and environment, it won't be the same dog. Same mental and physical capacities, I suppose, but learned behaviors and reactions to experiences and environment help mold a dog.

I almost feel sorry for the new pup with the added "expectations" to become the former dog, ya know?

imo
That is so true. I could never expect to replace a dog or any animal. They were special for who they were. They will always be alive in my heart and mind.
 

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If I had money to throw around, I'd totally do it. I wouldn't expect them to be the same or replace, but I'd be fascinated to see what similarities they had.
 

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Kim Kardashian just spent 750,000 dollars on a car for her BF Kanye West. I did not even know there were cars out there that cost seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars! (super market checkout had a line today... sigh...)

Yeah, money like that to toss around, I'd go out in the back yard, and find DNA from our old setter Cooper, who is buried out there and get someone to build a Jurassic Park style DNA replicator and have him cloned too! Well, maybe not, but its funny to contemplate!
 

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I dunno, seeing the new dog that looks EXACTLY like Niko and yet it being a completely different dog... I think that would make the loss even worse in a way.

Im also one who wont be getting him cremated and put in an urn...

I love him but that, to me, would be something to bring back to memory the fact that HE, NIKO is no longer here... The new dog make look like him, but it wouldn't BE him.

Thats my thoughts at least.
 

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I have not seen the show, but I did learn about cloning pets in one of my animal science classes. I am absolutely against it.
-The people who clone their pets do so because they can't let go and want a replica of their animal. They kid themselves that it's the same dog, but it's not personality-wise, and in some cases, even phenotypically.
-The pet cloning labs are all in Korea, I don't think that there are any in the US. Korea is not regulated by the same laws that regulate US labs, so you really don't know how the egg donor dogs, surrogate dogs, and extra clones are treated or cared for.
-Cloning is still an imperfect science and although it is improving, there are still many sickly animals produced.
-There are so many pets that need homes, why would you spend 30k to get a dog (and you really don't know what you're getting health-wise or behaviorally) when you could adopt a dog for soooooo much less.
-I could think of so many better ways to spend 30k.
-And last but not least, it's not really fair on the original pet or the clone to expect it to live up to the memories you had of/with the original dog. People really need to learn to move on.

On another note, here's a funny story:
I work at a doggie daycare and about a year ago a min. pin. named Junior passed away. A few months ago a new min. pin. puppy shows up, and the owners named him Junior too! I mean, I can understand getting the same breed, but the same name? I don't think that's something I'd ever do...
But I call him Junior Jr. :p
He's not a clone though. But it's weird how alike they are. Maybe they're related. They have a lot of the same quirks.
 

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I really think this speaks to the psyche of some humans.

The inability to let go or accept loss ... The need to "control" at any cost...

jmho
 

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Do they still have the telomere problem with clones? Dolly, the original cloned sheep, aged 5x faster than normal due to short telomeres caused by the cloning process. I was unaware they had fixed that problem.

Anyway, I don't even understand people who keep getting the same breed again and again*. I deliberately chose a dog that looked and acted different from Muggsy because it would kill me to have another of him around. It would be like being slapped in the face with his loss every time the new dog looked at me.



*Not saying it's wrong, I just don't know how people do it. Maybe I'm just not good at recovering from losses.
 

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Do they still have the telomere problem with clones? Dolly, the original cloned sheep, aged 5x faster than normal due to short telomeres caused by the cloning process. I was unaware they had fixed that problem.
Actually, that's a great question and I don't know for sure. I'd hope so if they were doing this for pets. That would be a reason I wouldn't do it (again, assuming I had zillions of dollars to waste... **sigh**)
 

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Holly, I did a quick search, and I wish I hadn't.

Cloned animals that do survive tend to be much bigger at birth than their natural counterparts. Scientists call this "Large Offspring Syndrome" (LOS). Clones with LOS have abnormally large organs. This can lead to breathing, blood flow and other problems.

Because LOS doesn't always occur, scientists cannot reliably predict whether it will happen in any given clone. Also, some clones without LOS have developed kidney or brain malformations and impaired immune systems, which can cause problems later in life.

. . .

When scientists looked at the telomere lengths of cloned animals, they found no clear answers. Chromosomes from cloned cattle or mice had longer telomeres than normal. These cells showed other signs of youth and seemed to have an extended lifespan compared with cells from a naturally conceived cow. On the other hand, Dolly the sheep's chromosomes had shorter telomere lengths than normal. This means that Dolly's cells were aging faster than the cells from a normal sheep.

To date, scientists aren't sure why cloned animals show differences in telomere length.
And, to top it off, the cloned animal can be vastly different from the original:

In a naturally-created embryo, the DNA is programmed to express a certain set of genes. Later on, as the embryonic cells begin to differentiate, the program changes. For every type of differentiated cell - skin, blood, bone or nerve, for example - this program is different.

In cloning, the transferred nucleus doesn't have the same program as a natural embryo. It is up to the scientist to reprogram the nucleus, like teaching an old dog new tricks. Complete reprogramming is needed for normal or near-normal development. Incomplete programming will cause the embryo to develop abnormally or fail.
 

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A famous barrel racer had a somewhat plain little gelding that won 11 world championships .. her horse was a gelding, so could not breed. She cloned him so she could breed the clone. Granted, the breed association doesn't recognize him ..

Her original horse had no white on him at all .. solid bay. The clone had a blaze and two back stockings.. Looks nothing like the original ..
 

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I heard the color differences are typical but that people see personality similarities. That being said, it could all be wishful thinking so they can justify the $$$ spent.

I just think it's fascinating, the pure science behind it.
 

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I wouldn't do it, even if I did have the money. Genetically yes it's the same dog, but you could never replicate the exact situations and experiences that made your dog your dog. I think having a dog that looked just like and acted somewhat similar (sorry, psych major. Nature vs Nurture fascinates me) would be more painful then losing the original dog in the first place
 

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A famous barrel racer had a somewhat plain little gelding that won 11 world championships .. her horse was a gelding, so could not breed. She cloned him so she could breed the clone. Granted, the breed association doesn't recognize him ..

Her original horse had no white on him at all .. solid bay. The clone had a blaze and two back stockings.. Looks nothing like the original ..
IIRC, small white bits can be caused by incomplete pigmentation migration instead of genetics.

If I ever had a large influx of spare cash and Prowl continues to excell at sports like he does, I could be tempted to clone him to breed. That's a lot of ifs though.
 

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I wouldn't do it.

I still mourn the loss my dog, I'd do just about anything to have HER back but a clone would not be her. A clone would be a cruel replica of her. It may look just like her and may even act somewhat like her but it wouldn't be her, and it's her that I miss. I don't miss the way she looked, I miss the personality quirks and the temperament that made her her. Cloning her would have been paying 30k for a dog that could never be her so why bother? I'd rather go adopt a new dog and donate the 30k to an animal shelter, or a dog rescue and do so in memory of her.
 
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