Dog Forum banner

21 - 40 of 49 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
My read on this, FWIW, is that this is indeed a real person, reporting on her actual experiences regarding petland and rescues and her new puppy.

The motivation behind making a post like this may be an unconscious desire for some sort of absolution from this group.

Of course, that is not what one will get from a forum like this.

Ditto.

I'll shut my mouth on the rest of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
For the folks who think this post isn't real, it is. Furthermore, I'm not promoting Petland. I told an exact account of my experience; no more, no less. I had also been reading this forum for several weeks prior to getting up the courage to post; so yes, I had a pretty good idea that my post would be unpopular; but in my experience, there's not much point in preaching to a choir. I was just hoping to stimulate some civil discourse about ethics, which is probably a long shot when dealing with such an emotional topic as this.

Before I bought my puppy, my knowledge about pet stores and puppy mills was basically this: Some pet stores get puppies from puppy mills, and puppy mills are terrible horrible places. That's pretty much the gist of it. So naturally, I wanted to be sure that our puppy didn't come from one of those places. So I asked the staff a lot of questions about her, to which I got what I thought were satisfactory answers with paperwork to back everything up.

1. She came from a USDA licensed breeder in Iowa
2. She was cleared by a vet when she arrived here
3. She has had zero health problems since arriving here
4. She is AKC registered.

After the inquiry, I thought "Great! No puppy mills here!" After bringing her home, I started doing a lot research on puppy mills and dog related topics in general (which is what brought me to this forum actually), and I found out that the problem is waaaaay more complicated that. It turns out the AKC is not the shining beacon of integrity and respectability that I thought it was. It also turns out that USDA regulations are not so fantastic either, even when in complete compliance.

So yes, I admit, at first I researched puppy mills because I was having doubts and I wanted to read something that would make me feel better about it all, then it developed into a genuine topical interest. I looked up common behavioral signs of a puppy mill bred dog, and then watched Acadia like a hawk for signs. I found none. I did searches on the specific breeder. I requested a puppy report on petshoppuppies.com. I went on the USDA website directly and looked up reports on the breeder AND the distributor. I searched for state reports couldn't locate any. I searched to see if there were complaints against the store. I learned what the OFA numbers next to the names on her pedigree mean (I didn't know what OFA was before and now I do), and I also learned that her pedigree COULD be fraudulent (one step forward, two steps back). I spent hours doing this. I left no internet stone unturned, and I found nothing conclusive one way or the other. The only conclusive thing I have, is a happy, apparently healthy, well-socialized dog (seriously, I have received numerous comments about how calm and well-socialized she is). I know this doesn't prove anything, but right now it's all I have. Now I understand what a gamble I've taken and would be heartbroken if some debilitating genetic disease manifests later, but we will pay whatever vet bills she needs because what's done is done. She's here now and deserves a good life. The bottom line is, I will never buy an animal from a pet store again. Period.

I have a scientific academic background. I have experience absorbing information from a lot of different sources, including news and scholarly articles. I consider myself an educated consumer of media, and I take NOTHING I read at face value. I was determined to ignore the emotional opinion pieces ("ALL pet stores buy from puppy mills and you're a horrible person if you shop there!") and focus solely on facts to formulate my own opinion. It raised some interesting some ethical questions, such as:

Can the kennel/distributor/store system be improved to an ethically acceptable level? It's not likely that it will ever just go away, so improving what exist seems to be the most pragmatic approach (this is my opinion). I'm not talking about morals, but ethics, which are two different things. I know that many breeders personally would not trust a distributor to responsibly home their puppies, but others don't share that view. It doesn't make them bad people, just ignorant.

Coming from a position of limited knowledge, I wanted to have discussion because I like discussions. This isn't about whether what I've done is right or wrong. Now I know what I've done and I take responsibility for it.

Also @Tulip, where I come from in Ohio (I live in northern Virginia now) there are only two types of dogs; mutts and fancy ones you see on TV. If you go to a shelter, you get your choice of mutts so that's what we were expecting. When I first met Acadia, all I saw was a beautiful sweet girl who needed a home, and we were already looking for some sort of golden mix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
...But you said you didn't want a 'fancy purebred', so why did you get a Golden Retriever? Did you mean you didn't feel like paying for a fancy one, and instead got a BYB one from a faster source.

That touches on one thing I really hate about puppies in stores. They could come from incredible breeders, be the best puppies in the world, but at the end of the day someone is walking into the store and buying a puppy with entirely the wrong and unhealthy mindset; that you can pick up a 15 year commitment off a shelf. That's a disgusting thing to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Nope, pet stores generally do not sell mutts.

I didn't mean to be confusing about this, as I made it sound that the breed (or number of breeds) was more important than it was. What I meant was...I wanted a dog from a shelter. Where I come from, all shelter dogs are mutts; therefore I wanted a mutt. I wasn't particular about the breed, but I've always had a soft spot for goldens, so I didn't want a purebred because I thought that purebreds only come from breeders, not that there was anything qualitatively inferior about purebreds. I wanted to save a dog, and I was basically told that I wasn't allowed to rescue a dog. After the frustration with the shelter applications, I believed that a shelter dog was out of my reach for reasons that I did not agree with. So I found a dog that I liked at a price I was willing to pay ($300, which is the same I would've paid at a shelter around here) and she happened to be purebred. If I had seen a purebred at a shelter that I hit it off with, I would've wanted to adopt that dog.

I don't see that as an unhealthy mindset. We have talked about getting a dog together for 4 years and were waiting until we were financially ready to do so. I have never had a dog, but have always wanted one. As such, I've been waiting 26 years for the opportunity to have one. My fiance recently dealt with the loss of his childhood best friend, a 16 year old chow mix, who had been too old to move to VA with us. She stayed with his parents. We are not unfamiliar with the commitment of having a dog

I absolutely agree that Petland should screen potential buyers of dogs, but I don't think that all or even most poorly thought-out pet purchases lead to bad homes, and not all people who pass the screening process at shelters are great pet parents. Maybe it's because I've never worked in a shelter before, but I generally have an optimistic view of humanity.

I understand the shelters' desire to put all their dogs in the best homes, but the reality is...dogs in high-kill shelters are being euthanized while the rescues trying to save them all try to cherry-pick only the best homes. My neighbors while growing up kept their dogs tied up all the time and thought it was "cruel" to spay/neuter. Those are the kind of people who shouldn't have dogs. We are the kind of people who deeply care about all of our animals and incorporate them into the family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
Sounds like you will give her a great home. You tried to rescue, and couldn't. I commend you. The shelters here, do no better job at screening than a pet store would. You need $95, and a vet reference.

I don't condone buying from pet stores or puppy mills. But in all honesty, that dog was going to go to a hone, or end up back to the breeder producing more, so I'm happy she has a good home and will not be bred.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,331 Posts
Marianne, I find you very articulate and forthright. It sounds like your puppy is super lucky to have been purchased by you. I hope you continue to participate here as you raise her. There are a lot of great resources here. If I were not on my cell, I would link you to a couple of great puppy books as you seem to be a reader. The names are "puppy primer" by Patricia McConnell and " before and after getting your puppy..." by Ian Dunbar. They are both worth a read even for experienced puppy raisers.

It sounds like your girl is already off to a good start. Perhaps some time you might want to start another thread about her with some pictures?
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,911 Posts
Glad things are working out well with your pup!
I agree, it sounds like she got a great home!:)

But I do just want to say that it sounds like she did come from a commercial breeder (aka Puppy Mill). Not all commercial breeding facilities are the horrific places we think of when we hear the words "puppy mill". So while she may have come from one of the "better" commercial breeders, her breeder is still mass producing puppies while meeting the minimum requirements set forth by the government to keep their doors open and make a profit. Really this industry is just so sad in so many ways... :(

Also next time you consider a dog (if you are still interested in adopting), widen your search! Look at different shelters and rescues in the area! There really are quite a few groups to consider!:)
I lived there (Woodbridge actually) for a bit. We had neighbors and friends that adopted dogs. They lived in apartments and townhouses so no fencing. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Sounds like you're giving the puppy a good home and that it's all working out well. I think this thread is a great opportunity for education, so people can make more informed decisions in the future.

I always thought the puppy mill thing was just about the health of the puppies. I never thought about the parents, till I became a foster parent for a 2yr old rescued Boston Terrier, who was bought by a rescue at a puppy mill auction. The rescue raised money to be able to attend the auction and buy as many dogs as they could afford to get them out of the puppy mills and into loving homes where people will care about them and they can live their lives as pets instead of breeding machines.

My foster dog has spent the last two years of her life in a tiny cage, doing nothing but breeding. When I first got her she was very obese, had a terrible coat, missing fur and calloused skin patches on her legs from laying on the cage wires, and her paws were very red, swollen, and completely hard and crust covered. She didn't walk much in the first week because she wasn't use to being able to walk around. She had never slept in a soft bed, and shook terribly anytime she had to be near a crate or cage. Despite how awful her life might have been, she is doing better now and her spirit seems to be very resilient.

Some rescues do charge 200-350 or more for a dog, but that money goes to vet care, food, etc. so they can rescue and help more animals find good homes. When you buy from a pet store, the money goes to the store and possibly supports puppy mills and back yard breeders who contribute to the over population of dogs. Some rescues are more strict on their requirements than others, but it is important the dog be placed in a home that is the right fit, so the dog isn't returned a month later to find another home, have the whole process stress them out.

I've known many rescues who would overlook a requirement, if they felt it would still be a good fit for the dog, and the dog was going to be adopted into a really good home. I was told I couldn't adopt my beagle mix Ronny because my husband was over in Iraq on orders at the time and all family members had to meet the adopted dog. Ronny came down with kennel cough and couldn't be adopted out yet, so I sent him a get well card, and told the rescue I could bring my dad in to meet him so they could see how he did with guys, and they said they would allow it since I showed them how much I cared and was a good fit otherwise for adopting Ronny.

My mom had a shelter tell her that even though she didn't have a fenced in yard, they would let her adopt because all her other info on the application made her a really caring and responsible pet parent. She made an extra effort to call them and talk to them about adopting so they were more open to the fact that she didn't have a fenced in yard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Also @Tulip, where I come from in Ohio (I live in northern Virginia now) there are only two types of dogs; mutts and fancy ones you see on TV. If you go to a shelter, you get your choice of mutts so that's what we were expecting. When I first met Acadia, all I saw was a beautiful sweet girl who needed a home, and we were already looking for some sort of golden mix.
Not sure what you mean by fancy ones you see on TV?
Nope, pet stores generally do not sell mutts.

I didn't mean to be confusing about this, as I made it sound that the breed (or number of breeds) was more important than it was. What I meant was...I wanted a dog from a shelter. Where I come from, all shelter dogs are mutts; .
Pets stores do sell mixes (labradoodles, yorkie poos, chugs, puggles ect)

And not sure why you say all shelters in your area are mutts. Just putting your location in petfinder i found tons and tons of purebreds. they are not hard at all to find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,782 Posts
I sell and breed animals for a living. Screening is important. I constantly have to clean up the "mess" from other vendors that sold pets to people without screening them

A puppy mill is a facility where dogs are mass produced for profit. Your dog came from a puppy mill no matter how you slice it. Dog factory, in which the parents are likely kenneled 24/7 and recieve no mental stimulation. Your pup is mellow likely because all the drive has been bred out of the bloodline. Too bad the HD isnt. I have seen two year old dogs put down for hd it was so bad....

Sure maybe they arent wallowing in feces, but they are still suffering.

And I think you know all that. Like i said. Rationalization.
Posted via Mobile Device



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,335 Posts
The only important factors in my mind is responsible breeding pairs (health checks), veterinary care, and humane treatment.

Now, I'm not trying to attack you, so I apologize if the tone of this post is not buttery. Your pup obviously lucked out and found herself a great home.

You sound like a smart person, so I just can't understand the logic behind the above statement and then you buying a puppy from a pet store. If you truly thought the factors above were important, then you'd have never bought from an industry that, by the rule, not the exception, does little to maintain healthy "breeding pairs" with sufficient health checks, provide adequate veterinary care, and humanely treat their animals. You'd have personally met the breeders, dogs, puppies, beforehand.


Whether or not your puppy's breeder maintained the atrocious facilities that our minds conjur after seeing images and footage of horrible puppy mills, you absolutely supported an industry that supports that type of care (or lack thereof). Pet stores buy from puppy mills. Period. (Okay, some also buy from BYBers, which is nothing to brag about either.) Sadly, you bought into the image the salesperson promoted that since they met the minimum government requirements, your pup just came from a "commercial breeder," not a horrible puppy mill like the one you saw on *fill in the blank with newstory.* (Speaking of newstories, check out the youtube video of the Dateline story on puppy mills. The ones shown are the better facilities you'd see, and it shows a golden retriever who had c-sections performed on her by a non-veterinarian, common in the industry. Also mentions that some debark their dogs by jamming hammer-like tools down their throats to damage the vocal chords.)


Are some worse than others, yes. But no commercial breeder/puppy mill/mass producer or petstore, gives a darn about where its puppies are going, and THAT is just one part of the problem. How many of these pups are going to be bred by BYBers "cuz they paid a lot of money for it" or "it is an AKC purebred" or etc. How many of those pups are going to end up in shelters because it was an impulse purchase and golly, it turns out they didn't have time for it, didn't have space for it, landlord said no dogs, they are moving, can't afford it, etc. How many of those pups are going to receive proper daily and vet care? How many of those breeders are going to be able to say, sure send me back the dog so I can find it a real forever home (and how many people would actually feel comfortable sending that pup back to a potential puppy mill anyways)? Care to venture a guess as to how many of those breeders even know where their pups are? I'd be interested in your explanation to us how it is ethical for the commercial breeders you've supported, to breed litter after litter and sending them to who knows where, when there are so many dogs in shelters and euthanized every year (as you've pointed out).


Puppies are usually taken from their litters and mother at way too young an age so that they can be given to the middle man and then distributed to the pet stores while they are still at that cute, baby puppy 8 weeks +/- age for marketing. Like what happened with your pup, older than the "desirable age" for pet stores, her price got marked down for a quick sale. Yes, your pup was healthy, but many pups die during the process getting from breeder to pet store due to illness, stress, improper handling, etc. Do you think all her siblings survived? Do you think they all went to as loving, caring, responsible homes as yours?


Even though you are providing your puppy a loving, educated, permanent home, and had been waiting/looking for a dog for awhile, most pups from pet stores don't have that luxury.


Rescues screen because our society is filled with impulsive buyers who want convenience and will, with little hesitation, dispose of whatever doesn't suit them. Our society's sense of responsibility is not what it should be. Animal retention is just as big a concern as BYBers and puppy mills, and animal shelters/rescues are left cleaning up the mess that irresponsible breeders and owners create. They are not cherry picking the best homes, they are trying to weed out homes that, in their experience, have low retention rates or may not provide sufficient care. Like another said, rescues take their adoption fees and put it towards rescuing other animals, vet care, training, food/shelter, food banks, education, etc. Pet stores take their money and just buy more puppies from more puppy mills with just as little care as the round prior. The former is trying to help, the latter doesn't even acknowledge a need for help- they just keep producing/selling as long as there's an uneducated market.


You said you've never worked at a shelter. My suggestion, since it seems like you care about animals, is to go volunteer at one. It's easy to have an optimistic idea about animal owners when you've never had behind-the-scenes experience with shelters, pounds, rescues, etc. I usually laugh and say I'm not pessimistic, just realistic, but I don't want to crush your faith in humanity--it would just open your eyes a bit more on the realities of pet ownership in America. As a volunteer, you likely won't even have to deal with euthanizing potential-pet after potential-pet, but I've been in that situation, so let me emphasize: It is not something that you can just forget about the next day or next year.


Ethics? No responsible, ethical breeder sells its pups without knowing where they're going, how they'll be taken care of, and when/if their owners need help. Period. Again, as you pointed out, many dogs are euthanized in shelters. Ethical breeders do everything they can to keep their puppies out of those situations. Puppy millers, petstores, BYBers do absolutely nothing. How is it ethical to financially support the petstore industry under those circumstances?


I respectfully disagree with your opinion that petstores will always sell puppies. So long as people try justifying the situation as you've tried to do, sure, they may stay in business. So long as irresponsible, impulsive buyers don't give two seconds of thought before buying that cute puppy (not you obviously), definitely, they'll stay in business. However, education and raising public concern does wonders and many pet stores have quit selling puppies. There is a simple solution to ending the cruelty of puppy mills: stop buying their products. (After all, the puppies are ONLY products to them.) If enough people would just stop buying from this industry, there would be no profit and no business. Writing posts like your OP, providing one good example of a responsible owner +a (thus far) healthy puppy, does nothing to help dispel the idea that it is ok to buy that pup from the store because of similar facts you'd learned from the salesperson.


The very nature of the petstore industry works against much effort for improving the situation for the breeding dogs and puppies. It is about profit. As said above, to profit, they have to be sold young, so that will always promote premature weaning. To profit, the breeders will always provide minimal care, just enough to meet regulations (or not be fined too many times in one period) and to keep their dogs alive long enough for breeding. Even if they lose dogs, it's not a huge financial loss since they are constantly producing others. Increased regulation on the breeding industry is one way welfare groups are addressing this issue, but I think the key is education against supporting the industry.


Regarding all that information you got about your pup's breeder, I can only suggest a person actually go visit the facilities (if they'll even let you). If you can stomach the conditions and aren't worried about the mental, emotional, and physical conditions of the breeding dogs you actually see and meet, then go ahead, sleep easy at night and keep telling people that you bought your puppy from Petland and it has been a good experience. (Again, not trying to be really snarky.) I realize you said you're not trying to promote buying pet store puppies and you'd never do it again, but why do it in the first place....


So where can people who have been turned down by rescues look for a new pet? Other rescues. Other/out of state shelters. Petfinder. Petango. Craigslist (which sadly shows just how high the turnover rate of dogs is, along with pathetic excuses and threats to take the dogs to the shelter....). Placing an ISO ad in your paper for a rehomed older puppy (avoid BYBers of course). Word of mouth through breed clubs and breeders. A responsible breeder's network! They may know of a well bred puppy who needs a new home. Shoot, with all of the time you spent searching for a pup, you could have been on a waiting list for a responsible breeder and doled out a little extra money for a healthy, well bred pup--people tend to forget that the purchase/adoption price is only a downpayment for future expenses to come. (Well bred does not necessarily mean having to pay over a thousand dollars- you could have looked for working/field goldens or a pet quality/limited registration pup from a breeder.)


I apologize for the long winded post. This is a high traffic forum, and I'd hate to see other people in your situation read your post and think that because it looks like you got a good puppy from a pet store they can justify buying one for the same reasons.... I'm glad your puppy seems okay right now, and I truly hope she stays healthy, living a long, happy life with you. I do regret that you supported that industry, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,331 Posts
There are a couple of things I am learning from this thread. One is that an intelligent well meaning person can end up with a puppy from petland. Perhaps this is because there are many levels of understanding the suffering caused by puppymills, a more abstract and more visceral.

How many problems in this world do most of us only understand at an abstract level and if we really "got it" would we all stand up and demand solutions? I can think of Darfur, or the current suffering in Syria, or you name the tragedy du jour.

I think folks have been doing a great job on this thread trying to educate future readers. the only thing I can think to add would be heart rending videos of mother dogs in cages.

It is interesting to me to have someone willing to talk about how they got their dog from a pet store.. That is to shed some light on the psychology. This is not a bad person clearly, so we learn a bit about how pet stores continue to sell puppies to good people.

Overall this thread starts to convince me that the route to stopping puppymills is not through dissuading every individual buyer out there, but more likely through legislation.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,782 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
Gosh, I need to check up on this forum more often! I just wanted to say, Crock I absolutely agree with you. It's obvious that you have a lot of knowledge on the subject, and brought up some points that I hadn't thought of. Thanks.

And Tess, thanks for distilling the point I was sort of trying to make, that if you want to convince people of something, it's useful to understand where they're coming from. Yes, I only understood puppy mills and pet stores in an "abstract" sort of way. If you are intimately aware of and passionate about an issue, it's easy to demonize the people who are perpetuating the problem. So here I am asking people not to put me in a box. And yes, I will absolutely post some pictures!

As an archaeologist, I get really disgruntled when I hear about people collecting arrowheads in a public park, because it's legally stealing and does irreparable harm to the archaeological record. But most people don't know that, and it probably never occurred to them to look it up. I try not to get mad when I hear about it and just gently explain why it's bad.

I wanted to talk about my experience buying from a pet shop, because there aren't enough people talking about it. Well-meaning people who don't realize exactly what they were doing. I didn't want people to read this and think that it's ok to buy puppies from pet shops, and I apologize if I made that impression.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
You said you've never worked at a shelter. My suggestion, since it seems like you care about animals, is to go volunteer at one. It's easy to have an optimistic idea about animal owners when you've never had behind-the-scenes experience with shelters, pounds, rescues, etc. I usually laugh and say I'm not pessimistic, just realistic, but I don't want to crush your faith in humanity--it would just open your eyes a bit more on the realities of pet ownership in America. As a volunteer, you likely won't even have to deal with euthanizing potential-pet after potential-pet, but I've been in that situation, so let me emphasize: It is not something that you can just forget about the next day or next year.
Wow i was just discussing this yesterday with one of my really good friends who's just moved back home. She lived in NC for a couple years, doing huge amounts of volunteering at rescues. I'm going to cut & paste her message to me:

The shelters down there vary from state to state and some counties have ZERO funding for their small shelters so they are run by volunteers ONLY. They have NO vet care. Miami-Dade shelter: For the fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 2011, some 49 percent of the animals — 14,379 in total — were euthanized at the facility.
We had dogs come to us from shelters in whcih they were run by inmates UNSUPERVISED, one dog was locked in a black box with no food, water or blankets, just sitting there in it's own waste in Georgia. Im prejudiced as well after what I've been through and seen. It's something i have to work through, post traumatic stress disorder some call it. I've seen cases where pit bulls were used as sex toys in the country, then died because of penetration. some sicker stories than that from the ghettos too. I hate to paint this picture to those that don't want to know .


She's considering seeing a therapist because of the mental and emotional repercussions of witnessing this first hand. The unfortunate reality of both these above statements is just how oblivious the general public really is to the true & deeply disturbing reality & repercussions of puppy milling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,800 Posts
For the folks who think this post isn't real, it is.
Before I bought my puppy, my knowledge about pet stores and puppy mills was basically this: Some pet stores get puppies from puppy mills, and puppy mills are terrible horrible places. That's pretty much the gist of it. So naturally, I wanted to be sure that our puppy didn't come from one of those places. So I asked the staff a lot of questions about her, to which I got what I thought were satisfactory answers with paperwork to back everything up.

1. She came from a USDA licensed breeder in Iowa
2. She was cleared by a vet when she arrived here
3. She has had zero health problems since arriving here
4. She is AKC registered.
It sounds like you did end up doing your research and learning about what I'm going to say, but what you were told demonstrate misconceptions that many consumers have about buying pet store dogs.
1. USDA breeders ARE puppy mills.
2 and 3. There are many health problems that develop later in life and just because they said that the dog is currently healthy doesn't mean her immune system or genetics are as good as dogs from reputable breeders.
4. AKC registration doesn't mean... anything. They register puppy mill and byb dogs.

I know you've probably already learned those things, but I am going to say that over 95% of puppies sold at pet stores are from puppy mills, and most of the other 5% are probably from BYBs. As other members have said, no ethical, reputable breeder would want their animals ending up with strangers. They'd want to know exactly where their puppies go and make sure that they are in the right homes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Crock is my new hero.
Ditto.

I have only limited exposure in volunteering (hoping to foster soon though!) but even there I have been shocked, absolutely shocked at they things I have seen and what I have heard. Dogs being dumped, abused, starved, ill, abandoned. It makes me wonder how I am the same species as the person who did such a thing... it makes me doubt my fellow man. Of course there are those who heal my faith in mankind as well... God bless all who volunteer and rescue.

One thing you can do is go on youtube and find a video (I can't remember its specific name...) talking about shelters and how often many dogs do not find homes. Watching a perfectly healthy animal being put down, the light and life leaving their body... even in a video in a different time and space brought me to tears. It made me so angry at the people responsible for the dog being in that position, and so sad that the dog did not have a forever home. Why did he have to die? He never should have. He could have been a kid's best friend, a woman's 'man of the hour' according to Nora Jones, or even possibly a service dog or SAR dog. The potential in that dog may never have been known. And it will never be fulfilled.

When you know these things, I think you can better understand why you get such an emotional response when the topic comes up. Like your emotions when people steal arrowheads and destroy an archeological record. People don't know any better, but is ignorance excusable? Is it by choice? And at what cost?

I always encourage people to adopt, to save a life. Or if they want a purebred do for whatever reason (plenty of good ones) then to go to a reputable breeder who does all that they can to make sure their dogs aren't forgotten or ending up in shelters (and many do support breed rescue as well). But going to a petstore or BYB... to go there when you know the terms... it's not right.

Of course saving one dog will not change the world. But surely for that one dog, the world will change forever.

Like I said in my earlier post, I am glad your pup is healthy and happy. But I do hope that many others will not go that route. Especially here in Northern VA, there are MANY wonderful shelters and rescues (of the mutt loving kind and breed specific).
 
21 - 40 of 49 Posts
Top