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Hi, I'm new here and I bought my puppy 3 weeks ago from Petland. First I need to say that when my fiancé and I started looking for a dog, we really wanted to do the right thing and adopt from a rescue or shelter. We applied for dogs at 3 different rescues and received 2 rejections and a non-response. We got rejected because we rent, don't have a yard, and already have a cat. We reject the idea that a yard is a necessity. When I was growing up, I was aquainted with many neighbors' and friends' dogs who were obese and unhealthy, all of whom had yards. They were just taken out to poop and pee, and never got any other exercise (most were also mean and aggressive). My fiancé grew up with dogs, all of whom were exercised and well-socialized.

As you can imagine, we got really frustrated trying to adopt, and we weren't prepared to shell out $1000+ for a "fancy purebred dog." The only option left was to go to Craigslist or a pet store, so we went to Petland (just to browse), and found a beautiful, healthy-looking golden retriever. Her price had been reduced because she was 17 weeks and "getting too old." They showed us her papers, which included a clean bill of health from a vet, and the name of her breeder (located in Iowa). Based on the information I had, there seemed to be no evidence of puppy mill origin. After we brought her home, I did some more research on the "puppy business" and found out it's not always as clear cut as that. The USDA reports on her breeder are all in compliance, and they never had more than 50 dogs on the premises at any given time. I read really emotional posts from people all the time saying that a responsible breeder would never to do this or never do that, but it's all pretty subjective to me. The only important factors in my mind is responsible breeding pairs (health checks), veterinary care, and humane treatment.

Which brings me back to MY dog, Acadia. She has been truly amazing; wonderful temperament, no health problems to speak of, super intelligent, responds quickly to training. She came home not knowing anything. By the end of our first day, she could walk on a leash like a pro. She was house broken in a week, except for a few accidents here and there. I've been working with her on some basic tricks, which she's picking up quickly. She gets three or more walks a day, and I take her to the dog park on my days off (I work 2 days a week). She loves everybody and everything, including our cat.

Sorry for the super long post. Would I ever consider buying from Petland again? Probably not. But I don't think it's fair to say that ALL pet store puppies come from puppy mills. I think that business model can be done responsibly, but I definitely support better federal and state kennel regulation. I'll probably get attacked for this, but I would appreciate anyone's thoughts.
 

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Maybe they don't all come from mills. Though I have never met a breeder which is more concerned with the welfare of his pups rather than making money, that would ever sell to a pet store. I personally want to know who is buying my dogs, and not everyone who shows up with a thousand dollars gets a pup.

Its good to hear your pup is doing well, many do, not all are horribly bred dogs.
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Discussion Starter #3
I personally want to know who is buying my dogs, and not everyone who shows up with a thousand dollars gets a pup.

Its good to hear your pup is doing well, many do, not all are horribly bred dogs.
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Yes, I think the only thing that bothered me about the buying process was the lack of questions I was asked by the staff at Petland. I just showed up with a credit card, end of story. I knew that she would be well-cared for, but they didn't. I don't mind being asked questions; I expect it. I just don't accept the reasons I was given by the rescues for why I shouldn't have a dog.
 

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Those "rescue " people are crazy.They don't even want you to leave it and go to work.They want to be sure you don't die first or even go on a vacation the first year after you adopt.Who is going to pay the bills?Ones' life must go on after "dog".Than the large price they want to charge is awful.No wonder the place is run over with dogs They need their heads exam.
 

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I would be hesitant to place one of mine in a home with no yard, or apartment, because of the energy level of the breed. That would not be a definable rule out, however.
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I was at a pet store recently where they sold puppies there and while some of the puppies appeared to be in fairly good health, there were some that were not. A black lab puppy was very lethargic and turned so he laid facing away from the crowds and showed no interest in his surroundings at all. There was a much older corgi puppy who was mentally not okay, as in he was just barking at any and everything non stop. He's going bonkers in that container. There was a golden pup there but he was missing hair around his eyes, but perked right up when we took him to the play area (no intent on me buying anything from that store, but I wanted to give the puppy the opportunity to get out and play). And for that golden puppy? 1700, or 1500 cash.

I could go to a reputable golden breeder who does health testing on their stock (including eyes and hips especially for goldens) and get a pet quality puppy for 800-1000 dollars. I'd have a health guarantee, I'd know the parents and have met them, I'd know any titles on their dogs and what they do with them. And I'd have the support of the breeder throughout my dog's lifetime. You get a lot more, for a lot less in this scenario.

I myself would never support a pet store selling puppies. It leads to too many impulse buys and feeds an industry that does not care about dogs. Even if the pup is from a breeder, I wouldn't want to support anybody who is willing to put there puppies in a pet store whether it is a breeder or worse a puppy mill. With impulse buys, too many people are not ready for a puppy. Especially with some of the breeds they have (mastiffs and huskies) which are not dogs for everyone.

I am very glad to hear that your puppy is healthy and happy so far, and that she is a wonderful companion. But many pet store puppies are not so lucky.

ETA: Also there are many rescues out there who have smaller adoption fees as well as not as strict requirements to who they adopt their dog out to. Without rescues and the work they do, especially the good ones, there would be a lot less hope for the dogs out there without homes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Julie, I have found conflicting information about whether goldens do well in apartments. Some sources say no and others says they can, but they all say goldens are "inside" dogs who need to be with the family. Acadia ("Cady") usually just follows me around and sits quietly or naps next to me while we're inside, especially after she tires herself out at the dog park, where she runs around like crazy. Her energy is fine by us, since we like being outside and going to parks and trails. In general, she is very calm, not hyperactive at all. That might not be true for all goldens though.
 

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I do think with proper exercise most dogs can happily live in an apartment. Some need more exercise han others to fulfill their needs.
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I would never purchase from a Petstore.

A responsible breeder has the welfare of the dogs in mind. They screen homes of potential puppy owners, showing up with money does not mean you will get a dog. They have contracts that require you to spay or neuter the puppy so that their lines are protected and to prevent unwanted litters and so that if for some reason you cannot keep the dog down the road - there is a contract stating the dog must be returned to them. A responsible breeder will breed parents that have been health tested (clean physical exam as well as eye and hip/elbow clearences) and have excellent temperments. Health testing can become quite expensive. A responsible breeder doesn't breed for money but to better the breed.

I did not adopted from a local rescue because I am looking for a particular breed that is uncommon in the local shelters and it is harder to adopt from a breed specific rescue when you are looking for a younger dog (under 5 years) that is going to be okay around small children, dogs and livestock and can handle an owner that works 14 hour night shifts. I'm probably not their first choice for a home. After time I began looking into breeders, one that fit my criteria of a "responsible breeder" and I found one. There are few Westie breeders in the province and even fewer breed for health and temperment (its normally for
appearence).

However, never will I purchase from a Petstore. The parents will not have been health tested. The breeder obviously did not care enough about their lines to place them in responsible loving homes on contacts. Then they live in a small area in a petstore for x number of days urinating and defecating on shredded paper or wood shavings which will become a house training disaster. Majority of the puppies probbaly left the litter long before 8 weeks of age which is likely going to be another disaster of its own. I have one of these dogs living in my care now, my parents had wanted this little guy and did not know better and now I am looking after him. A dog with seperation anxiety that had to go through much behaviour modification. He was a house training NIGHTMARE! He also has allergies that required some strict management. He turned out a great dog because of responsible owners but it's not a situation I would ever do again.
 

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Hound dog and vettech, what GREAT posts!!!!!!!!!!! I am not going to add anything except, as a breeder of Smooth Fox Terriers, who does health testing, conformation championships,working titles, temperament tests and stays in touch with my puppies, I would NEVER send my puppies to a pet store, and NO caring responsible breeder would. EVER. End Of Story.

I want to know how my pups are doing, if any health issues come up, temperament issues, cute stories, adorable pictures and any titles the dog gets. I love each and every puppy and love getting updates on them.
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These puppy stores do only get their puppies from PUPPY MILLS or backyard breeders. I am sorry you went that route....

Vermae....as for rescues being crazy, not all of them have restrictions, it is not an excuse to go to a puppy mill or backyard breeder. I guarantee you could find SOMETHING out there, or heck...don't get a puppy...get an adult.
 

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We were told no by some rescues when we tried to adopt a dog, as we rented (in a ground floor flat at the time) and didn't have a garden...so instead we adopted straight from the owner of a dog who was on a waiting list for the rescue we volunteered at :)

There are plenty of other ways to adopt / rescue a dog, you don't have to do it through actual rescues. Look for notices at vet's, sites like Preloved usually have ads from owners who genuinely need a new home for their dog...obviously there are also back-yard-breeders and people bored of their dog but still trying to sell it for £££'s too! :rolleyes:

We rescued a 9 month old Springer x BC, incredibly hyper, and yet never had any problems when we lived in a flat. With proper exercise (around 3 hours a day) he was much calmer and a very happy dog.

Red
 

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Petlands buying practices create massive amounts of suffering on many levels

Im sure the op knew this post would cause a riot. Demonize rescues blanketly and then promote buying from THE worst place. Its fishy and Like I said. I dot thinkthis post is real


Even if it is real which I doubt. The op is sure going to feel stupid when the dog develops HD at a young age.

My vote, post the "kennel" name and let us decide. This whole post sounds like rationalisation
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I dont get why this is in the adoptions or rescue section. As buying a dog, from any where like a pet store is neither a rescue or adoption.

Just because she is healthy now. Doesnt mean how she will be in a year, 4 years, 8 years. Goldens have horrible hips and a massive list of cancers in the breed, among other things. Id never own a golden, much less one from a pet store.

NO good responsible breeder will sell to a pet store. end. of. story.

Petland may not buy strictly from puppymills (though I doubt it). They do not buy from good breeders. prob more like 3rd party sellers.

Good luck with your dog. I hope she stays healthy. But you bought her, not rescue or adopted.

I too have a petstore dog. I bought him. he was in deplorable conditions when I seen him (the cages were NASTY, dead animals in the store, smelt horrid. No fresh food or water. But I paid money for him, so I bought him)

Had him for almost 9 years now. wouldnt change a thing. But id never do it again.
 

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My read on this, FWIW, is that this is indeed a real person, reporting on her actual experiences regarding petland and rescues and her new puppy.

The motivation behind making a post like this may be an unconscious desire for some sort of absolution from this group.

Of course, that is not what one will get from a forum like this.
 

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pretty subjective to me. The only important factors in my mind is responsible breeding pairs (health checks), veterinary care, and humane treatment.

I realise what's done is done, and you obviously care deeply for your dog, so I'm not about to tell you what you did was wrong (even if I feel it so), but I will just point out that being a reputable breeder does not just mean health checking, vet care, and humane treatment.
For one thing, Retrievers should be hip-scored. Another is that as a breeder myself, I would want to know *exactly* where my puppies are going, and as a result just yesterday I had a lovely woman visit me to put her name down for my next litter in 6 months time. I cleared her with flying colours and she will make a perfect home. I would never home a puppy in a home that wasn't perfect and I've turned down as many as 6 homes in just one day because they weren't perfect. I care about the animals I bring into the world and would never put them into a store or shop to be sold to anyone, as I would have no idea if they were a good home and if they'd end up in a rescue centre in the next year.

I find it really odd that you didn't want a purebred but you went and got a purebred?
 
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